Tag Archives: positive

The Classic Pamela Positive: “We Were Born To Succeed, Not To Fail.” – Henry David Thoreau

 

“We were born to succeed, not to fail.”

– Henry David Thoreau

 

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That is our life purpose. To follow our calling in our own specially designed way. And so we will succeed, because the measurement is solely on how you uniquely pursue your talents, goals, and qualities. Everyone has a different picture of success, his or her own beautiful expression.

I Love Your Expression,

Pamela

 


Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) was an author, philosopher, poet, abolitionist, and naturalist. He grew up in Massachusetts, into the “modest New England family” of John Thoreau, a pencil maker, and Cynthia Dunbar. He had two older siblings, Helen and John Jr., and a younger sister, Sophia. Thoreau’s birthplace still exists on Virginia Road in Concord. He studied at Harvard College between 1833 and 1837.

After college, he opened a grammar school with his brother in Concord, Massachusetts. During this time, he met Ralph Waldo Emerson who introduced him to other writers and encouraged him to publish his thoughts. He is the author of Walden, which is a philosophical argument for simple living and preservation of natural environment.  He also had other important writings on natural history, environmentalism and civil disobedience.

Bio Source: Wikipedia  Fig¹. Photo by Ian Stauffer on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: To Have A Positive Mindset: Think About Building Your Mind As You Would Your Dream Home

 

When you build a home, you have to have a vision. A vision of what you would like to create. If you have a negative vision of your home then it certainly is not going to become a beautiful home! So we need to maintain that vision, even when the going gets rough. Even if you run out of brick. Even if the paint color didn’t match the way you wanted it to. Even if you have to fumigate!

Hold the vision, and keep striving for it.

 

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So what has helped me during tough times is not just to focus on the positive, but on gratitude. Even in tough times there is something to be grateful for. If you are having a hard time in sales and partnerships, perhaps you can be grateful you uplifted that potential client’s day with a positive smile or sincere compliment…

On an entirely different level… if a natural disaster has occurred, you can still be grateful that the sun came out, as in many countries pollution blocks the sun. That a friend is near. That people are caring and helping.

 

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Even in a crisis, and often especially in a crisis, the greatest goodness of people comes out. We can find the good even when we don’t seem ‘to have or own much.’ True wealth comes from qualities of being loving, kind, sincere, genuine, giving. And how wonderful — that that wealth is available to each one of us, every moment.

 


Fig¹. Photo by Pixabay on Pexels  Fig². Photo by Priscilla Du Preez on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: The Most Positive Things You Can Say

 

Here are the top things you can say to make a relationship work, from All There Is:

 

“You look great.

Can I help?

Let’s eat out.

I was wrong.

I am sorry.

I love you.”

Dave Isay

 

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Say Something Positive Today!!

Pamela

 


All There Is by Dave Isay grew from the StoryCorps initiative, a project to record the oral histories of individuals. StoryCorps has collected stories from more than 75,000 people, in an attempt to record the history of people who rarely appear in history books. In 2010, Isay published another book from StoryCorps stories, Mom: A Celebration of Mothers from StoryCorps. All There Is celebrates love, with heartwarming stories from real couples. Leroy A. Morgan contributed the list quoted above.

Bio Source: Wikipedia  Fig¹. Photo by Alesia Kazantcevas on Pexels

The Classic Pamela Positive: Be Prepared To Be Kind

 

Be Prepared. That’s the motto of the Girl Scouts and Boy Scouts.

When you think about it, being prepared is not just for wilderness trips. And while being prepared often means having savings, storing water for an earthquake or natural disaster, and keeping a flashlight in your car, it also means being prepared qualitatively. It’s about being prepared to react with positive qualities, in your day to day life.

 

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It’s all about what you hold, store and prepare within yourself.

So be prepared to be kind.

Some days you may not receive pleasant news. Will you react in anger, distrust, sadness, gloom? Or will you respond with patience, a willingness to see all sides and the realization that all things are truly working towards a greater good?

 

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Set yourself to react kindly. That means both to yourself and others. Don’t come down hard on yourself; don’t come down hard on others. Be understanding.

Be prepared to be kind. It’s the ultimate preparation.

 


Girl Scouts: Girl Scouts of the USA is the world’s preeminent organization dedicated solely to girls—all girls—where, in an accepting and nurturing environment, girls build character and skills for success in the real world. In partnership with committed adult volunteers, girls develop qualities that will serve them all their lives, like leadership, strong values, social conscience, and conviction about their own potential and self-worth.

Boy Scouts: The Boy Scouts of America is one of the nation’s largest and most prominent values-based youth development organizations. The BSA provides a program for young people that builds character, trains them in the responsibilities of participating citizenship, and develops personal fitness.

Bio Source: Girl Scouts, Boy Scouts of America  Fig¹. Kevia Tan on Unsplash  Fig². Hian Oliveira on Unsplash  

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Civility Is The Behavior That Marks…Share Common, Public, And Political Space” – Daniel Mendelsohn

 

“Civility is the behavior that marks mutual acknowledgment that we individuals share common, public, and political space. Think about the platforms through which you interact with people all day, the media that we call social, but if anything, have enhanced our ability to be asocial.

To screen every element of society, culture, and politics that doesn’t suit or flatter or soothe us; thereby, removing the necessity for civility in the first place.”

―Daniel Mendelsohn

 

Graciousness, goodness, civility—all of this helps us to maintain a sense of calm and peace. Did you know anxiety is one of the most prevalent challenges we face in the U.S.? Nearly one 1/5 of our population experiences it. Yet only 1/3 try to find help.1 They are hurting… and continue to hurt. 

 

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Where do we think this anxiety is coming from? First, it’s coming from disconnectedness. We aren’t really getting the nurturance and love that we need from one-on-one interactions. And those interactions need to be with people we don’t know, and with people we do.

With people we do know, we build upon positive loving actions that make them become habit and security. With people we don’t know, it enforces the need to extend ourselves, to spread love and to give back. Both are essential.

 

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If we want more civility, that means that we need to slow down. If we want more civility, that means less screen time. If we want more civility, that means that we care and express our love for more people. It’s that simple. And who doesn’t want to love more? So let’s try.

May you live a civil day today, may you live it with care for everyone in every word that you give out, in every touch, and every comment that you make. And in every thought, so that in our minds and in our actions, civility becomes the natural way again.

 

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How we all long for graciousness and civility!

With Graciousness,

Pamela

 


Daniel Mendelsohn is a classist, writer, and critic. A graduate of Princeton’s graduate school, he published work on Euripidean tragedy before he went on to become a contributor to publications such as The New York TimesOutThe Nation and more. He was born in Long Island and raised in Old Bethpage, New York. He received his undergraduate degree at the University of Virginia in Classics. He writes reviews on books, films, theater, and television. He has won Princeton University’s James Madison Medal in 2018, American Philological Association President’s Award for service to the Classics in 2014 and the American Academy of Arts and Letters award for Prose Style in 2014. Currently, he is a professor at Bard College. He is also the director of the Robert B. Silvers Foundation, which supports writers. In his free time, Mendelsohn enjoys watching television and going to the movie theater. He has two children and four siblings, including a brother who is a film director, another brother who is a photographer and a sister who is a journalist.

Bio Source: Wikipedia, Daniel Mendelsohn Official Website  Fig¹. Photo by Andrew Neel on Unsplash  Fig². Photo by Kira auf der Heide on Unsplash  Fig³. Photo by Naassom Azevedo on Unsplash  Citation: 1 “Facts & Statistics”, Anxiety and Depression Association of America, https://adaa.org/about-adaa/press-room/facts-statistics