Tag Archives: positive thoughts

The Classic Pamela Positive: Positive Thoughts Become Your Words. -Mahatma Gandhi

 

“Keep your thoughts positive because your thoughts become your words. Keep your words positive because your words become your behavior. Keep your behavior positive because your behavior becomes your habits. Keep your habits positive because your habits become your values. Keep your values positive because your values become your destiny.”

―Mahatma Gandhi

 

Photo of Woman Looking at the Mirror

 

Positive thoughts Become your Words…

Positive Thoughts Become your Behavior…

Positive Thoughts Become your Habits…

Positive Thoughts Become your Values…

And Positive Thoughts Become your Destiny.

So, Keep Positive!

Keeping on the Positive Train of Thought,

Pamela

 


Mahatma Gandhi was a political and spiritual leader during the Indian Independence movement. He preached resistance through non-violence and mass civil disobedience. He led the Indian National Congress and advocated for the end of poverty, for women’s rights and for independence from Britain. He also renounced religious violence and did several fasts in protest against it. Gandhi was deeply inspired by his Hindu faith, while also drawing on other religious philosophy, and advocating religious tolerance. He married Kasturbai Gandhi and they had four children together.

Bio Source: Wikipedia, The Concept of Leadership


Fig¹.Photo by bruce mars on Pexels

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Civility Is The Behavior That Marks…Share Common, Public, and Political Space” – Daniel Mendelsohn

 

“Civility is the behavior that marks mutual acknowledgement that we individuals share common, public, and political space. Think about the platforms through which you interact with people all day, the media that we call social, but if anything, have enhanced our ability to be asocial.

To screen every element of society, culture and politics that doesn’t suit or flatter or soothe us; thereby, removing the necessity for civility in the first place.”

―Daniel Mendelsohn

 

Graciousness, goodness, civility—all of this helps us to maintain a sense of calm and peace. Did you know anxiety is one of the most prevalent challenges we face in the U.S.? Nearly one 1/5 of our population experiences it. Yet only 1/3 try to find help.1 They are hurting… and continue to hurt. 

 

man wearing knit cap on grey background

 

Where do we think this anxiety is coming from? First, it’s coming from disconnectedness. We aren’t really getting the nurturance and love that we need from one-on-one interactions. And those interactions need to be with people we don’t know, and with people we do.

With people we do know, we build upon positive loving actions that make them become habit and security. With people we don’t know, it enforces the need to extend ourselves, to spread love and to give back. Both are essential.

 

kira-auf-der-heide-475623-unsplash (1) (1) (1).jpg

 

If we want more civility, that means that we need to slow down. If we want more civility, that means less screen time. If we want more civility, that means that we care and express our love for more people. It’s that simple. And who doesn’t want to love more? So let’s try.

May you live a civil day today, may you live it with care for everyone in every word that you give out, in every touch, and every comment that you make. And in every thought, so that in our minds and in our actions, civility becomes the natural way again.

 

naassom-azevedo-541451-unsplash (1) (1) (1).jpg

 

How we all long for graciousness and civility!

With Graciousness,

Pamela

 


Daniel Mendelsohn is a classist, writer, and critic. A graduate of Princeton’s graduate school, he published work on Euripidean tragedy before he went on to become a contributor to publications such as The New York TimesOutThe Nation and more. He was born in Long Island and raised in Old Bethage, New York. He received his undergraduate degree at the University of Virginia in Classics. He writes reviews on books, films, theater and television. He has won Princeton University’s James Madison Medal in 2018, American Philological Association President’s Award for service to the Classics in 2014 and the American Academy of Arts and Letters award for Prose Style in 2014. Currently, he is a professor at Bard College. He is also the director of the Robert B. Silvers Foundation, which supports writers. In his free time, Mendelsohn enjoys watching television and going to the movie theater. He has two children and four siblings, including a brother who is a film director, another brother who is a photographer and a sister who is a journalist.

Bio Source: Wikipedia, Daniel Mendelsohn Official Website


Citations:

1 “Facts & Statistics”, Anxiety and Depression Association of America, https://adaa.org/about-adaa/press-room/facts-statistics

Fig¹.  Photo by Andrew Neel on Unsplash

Fig². Photo by Kira auf der Heide on Unsplash

Fig³. Photo by Naassom Azevedo on Unsplash

The Pamela Positive: “If Only You Try” – Dr. Seuss

 

 

“Think Left And Think Right And Think Low And Think High.  Oh, The Things You Can Think Up If Only You Try”

 – Dr. Seuss

 

 

There’s never a point of giving up. As Dr. Seuss says, there’s so many things you can think up— if you only try.

 

 

close-up photo of Thought Catalog book

 

 

Did you know that more 2,500 thoughts go through your head every hour?¹ Did you know that more than 60,000 ideas run through your mind on a single day? That means you’re filled with right ideas; right creativity; and new pathways.

 

 

Sweethearts Dream Big box

 

 

You can’t be stuck in a job, feel there’s no way out of a relationship, feel blocked in a relationship, feel stuck in a partnership, or stuck in anything!   You don’t have to feel trapped in a job, trapped in a salary range, or concerned about tomorrow. You don’t even have to have faith in a larger being or universe, even Dr. Seuss encourages us to think, to try! And with that, we will find our way.

 

I’m Finding My Way With You,

Pamela

 

 


Theodor Seuss Geisel(1904-1991), better known by his pen name Dr. Seuss, was a writer and cartoonist who published over 60 books. He published his first children’s book, And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street, under the name of Dr. Seuss in 1937. Dr. Seuss won numerous awards for his work, including the 1984 Pulitzer Prize, an Academy Award, three Emmys and three Grammys.

Theodor Seuss Geisel was born on March 2, 1904, in Springfield, Massachusetts. His father, Theodor  Robert Geisel, was a successful brewmaster; his mother was Henrietta Seuss Geisel. At age 18, Geisel left home to attend Dartmouth College, where he became the editor in chief of its humor magazine, Jack-O-Lantern. When Geisel and his friends were caught drinking in his dorm room one night, in violation of Prohibition law, he was kicked off the magazine staff, but continued to contribute to it using the pseudonym “Seuss.” After graduating from Dartmouth, Geisel attended the University of Oxford in England, with plans to eventually become a professor. While studying at Oxford, Dr. Seuss met his future wife, Helen Palmer. The couple married in 1927 and moved back to the United States the same year. Dr. Seuss never had any children of his own.

Biosource: BIOGRAPHY


Citations:

¹ Sasson, Remez, “How Many Thoughts Does Your Mind Think in One Hour?”, Success Consciousness, https://www.successconsciousness.com/blog/inner-peace/how-many-thoughts-does-your-mind-think-in-one-hour/

Fig. ¹: Photo by Thought Catalog on Unsplash

Fig. ²: Photo by NeONBRAND on Unsplash

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Civility Is The Behavior That Marks…Share Common, Public, and Political Space” – Daniel Mendelsohn

 

 

“Civility is the behavior that marks mutual acknowledgement that we individuals share common, public, and political space. Think about the platforms through which you interact with people all day, the media that we call social, but if anything, have enhanced our ability to be asocial.

To screen every element of society, culture and politics that doesn’t suit or flatter or soothe us; thereby, removing the necessity for civility in the first place.”

–       Daniel Mendelsohn

 

 

Graciousness, goodness, civility—all of this helps us to maintain a sense of calm and peace. Did you know anxiety is one of the most prevalent challenges we face in the U.S.? Nearly one 1/5 of our population experiences it. Yet only 1/3 try to find help.1 They are hurting… and continue to hurt. 

 

 

aaron-burden-527200-unsplash (1) (1) (1).jpg

 

 

Where do we think this anxiety is coming from? First, it’s coming from disconnectedness. We aren’t really getting the nurturance and love that we need from one-on-one interactions. And those interactions need to be with people we don’t know, and with people we do.

 

With people we do know, we build upon positive loving actions that make them become habit and security. With people we don’t know, it enforces the need to extend ourselves, to spread love and to give back. Both are essential.

 

 

kira-auf-der-heide-475623-unsplash (1) (1) (1).jpg

 

 

If we want more civility, that means that we need to slow down. If we want more civility, that means less screen time. If we want more civility, that means that we care and express our love for more people. It’s that simple. And who doesn’t want to love more? So let’s try.

 

May you live a civil day today, may you live it with care for everyone in every word that you give out, in every touch, and every comment that you make. And in every thought, so that in our minds and in our actions, civility becomes the natural way again.

 

 

naassom-azevedo-541451-unsplash (1) (1) (1).jpg

 

How we all long for graciousness and civility!

With Graciousness,

Pamela

 


 

 

Daniel Mendelsohn is a classist, writer, and critic. A graduate of Princeton’s graduate school, he published work on Euripidean tragedy before he went on to become a contributor to publications such as The New York TimesOutThe Nation and more. He was born in Long Island and raised in Old Bethage, New York. He received his undergraduate degree at the University of Virginia in Classics. He writes reviews on books, films, theater and television. He has won Princeton University’s James Madison Medal in 2018, American Philological Association President’s Award for service to the Classics in 2014 and the American Academy of Arts and Letters award for Prose Style in 2014. Currently, he is a professor at Bard College. He is also the director of the Robert B. Silvers Foundation, which supports writers. In his free time, Mendelsohn enjoys watching television and going to the movie theater. He has two children and four siblings, including a brother who is a film director, another brother who is a photographer and a sister who is a journalist.

 

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: “There is no door that love will not open.”

“There’s no difficulty that enough love will not conquer . . . no gulf that enough love will not bridge; no wall that enough love will not throw down; how hopeless the outlook . . . how great the mistake. A sufficient realization of love will dissolve it all.”

Emmet Fox

 

I think this is beautiful and these kind of things are so important to keep emphasizing.

 

 

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*****

 

 

Emmet Fox (1886 – 1951) was a New Thought spiritual leader, meaning that he was aligned with the philosophical movement from early 20th century USA. His words were particularly influential during the Great Depression when he would give sermons to people suffering from the economic downturn. Today, he is remembered for his strikingly beautiful phrases and his involvement with the New Thought movement.

Classic Pamela Positive: “There is no door that love will not open.”

“There’s no difficulty that enough love will not conquer . . . no gulf that enough love will not bridge; no wall that enough love will not throw down; how hopeless the outlook . . . how great the mistake. A sufficient realization of love will dissolve it all.” – Emmet Fox

I think this is beautiful and these kind of things are so important to keep emphasizing.

autumn-1072827_1920.jpg

Emmet Fox (1886 – 1951) was a New Thought spiritual leader, meaning that he was aligned with the philosophical movement from early 20th century USA. His words were particularly influential during the Great Depression when he would give sermons to people suffering from the economic downturn. Today, he is remembered for his strikingly beautiful phrases and his involvement with the New Thought movement.

Classic Pamela Positive: “There is no door that love will not open.”

“There’s no difficulty that enough love will not conquer . . . no gulf that enough love will not bridge; no wall that enough love will not throw down; how hopeless the outlook . . . how great the mistake. A sufficient realization of love will dissolve it all.” – Emmet Fox

I think this is beautiful and these kind of things are so important to keep emphasizing.

autumn-1072827_1920.jpg

Δ~~~~~~~~Δ~~~~~~~~Δ

Emmet Fox (1886 – 1951) was a New Thought spiritual leader, meaning that he was aligned with the philosophical movement from early 20th century USA. His words were particularly influential during the Great Depression when he would give sermons to people suffering from the economic downturn. Today, he is remembered for his strikingly beautiful phrases and his involvement with the New Thought movement.