Tag Archives: positive thoughts

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Civility Is The Behavior That Marks…Share Common, Public, and Political Space” – Daniel Mendelsohn

 

 

“Civility is the behavior that marks mutual acknowledgement that we individuals share common, public, and political space. Think about the platforms through which you interact with people all day, the media that we call social, but if anything, have enhanced our ability to be asocial.

To screen every element of society, culture and politics that doesn’t suit or flatter or soothe us; thereby, removing the necessity for civility in the first place.”

–       Daniel Mendelsohn

 

 

Graciousness, goodness, civility—all of this helps us to maintain a sense of calm and peace. Did you know anxiety is one of the most prevalent challenges we face in the U.S.? Nearly one 1/5 of our population experiences it. Yet only 1/3 try to find help.1 They are hurting… and continue to hurt. 

 

 

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Where do we think this anxiety is coming from? First, it’s coming from disconnectedness. We aren’t really getting the nurturance and love that we need from one-on-one interactions. And those interactions need to be with people we don’t know, and with people we do.

 

With people we do know, we build upon positive loving actions that make them become habit and security. With people we don’t know, it enforces the need to extend ourselves, to spread love and to give back. Both are essential.

 

 

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If we want more civility, that means that we need to slow down. If we want more civility, that means less screen time. If we want more civility, that means that we care and express our love for more people. It’s that simple. And who doesn’t want to love more? So let’s try.

 

May you live a civil day today, may you live it with care for everyone in every word that you give out, in every touch, and every comment that you make. And in every thought, so that in our minds and in our actions, civility becomes the natural way again.

 

 

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How we all long for graciousness and civility!

With Graciousness,

Pamela

 


 

 

Daniel Mendelsohn is a classist, writer, and critic. A graduate of Princeton’s graduate school, he published work on Euripidean tragedy before he went on to become a contributor to publications such as The New York TimesOutThe Nation and more. He was born in Long Island and raised in Old Bethage, New York. He received his undergraduate degree at the University of Virginia in Classics. He writes reviews on books, films, theater and television. He has won Princeton University’s James Madison Medal in 2018, American Philological Association President’s Award for service to the Classics in 2014 and the American Academy of Arts and Letters award for Prose Style in 2014. Currently, he is a professor at Bard College. He is also the director of the Robert B. Silvers Foundation, which supports writers. In his free time, Mendelsohn enjoys watching television and going to the movie theater. He has two children and four siblings, including a brother who is a film director, another brother who is a photographer and a sister who is a journalist.

 

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: “There is no door that love will not open.”

“There’s no difficulty that enough love will not conquer . . . no gulf that enough love will not bridge; no wall that enough love will not throw down; how hopeless the outlook . . . how great the mistake. A sufficient realization of love will dissolve it all.”

Emmet Fox

 

I think this is beautiful and these kind of things are so important to keep emphasizing.

 

 

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*****

 

 

Emmet Fox (1886 – 1951) was a New Thought spiritual leader, meaning that he was aligned with the philosophical movement from early 20th century USA. His words were particularly influential during the Great Depression when he would give sermons to people suffering from the economic downturn. Today, he is remembered for his strikingly beautiful phrases and his involvement with the New Thought movement.

Classic Pamela Positive: “There is no door that love will not open.”

“There’s no difficulty that enough love will not conquer . . . no gulf that enough love will not bridge; no wall that enough love will not throw down; how hopeless the outlook . . . how great the mistake. A sufficient realization of love will dissolve it all.” – Emmet Fox

I think this is beautiful and these kind of things are so important to keep emphasizing.

autumn-1072827_1920.jpg

Emmet Fox (1886 – 1951) was a New Thought spiritual leader, meaning that he was aligned with the philosophical movement from early 20th century USA. His words were particularly influential during the Great Depression when he would give sermons to people suffering from the economic downturn. Today, he is remembered for his strikingly beautiful phrases and his involvement with the New Thought movement.

Classic Pamela Positive: “There is no door that love will not open.”

“There’s no difficulty that enough love will not conquer . . . no gulf that enough love will not bridge; no wall that enough love will not throw down; how hopeless the outlook . . . how great the mistake. A sufficient realization of love will dissolve it all.” – Emmet Fox

I think this is beautiful and these kind of things are so important to keep emphasizing.

autumn-1072827_1920.jpg

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Emmet Fox (1886 – 1951) was a New Thought spiritual leader, meaning that he was aligned with the philosophical movement from early 20th century USA. His words were particularly influential during the Great Depression when he would give sermons to people suffering from the economic downturn. Today, he is remembered for his strikingly beautiful phrases and his involvement with the New Thought movement.

“We are what our thoughts have made us; so take care about what you think. Words are secondary. Thoughts live; they travel far.” -Swami Vivekananda

“We are what our thoughts have made us; so take care about what you think. Words are secondary. Thoughts live; they travel far.”

– Swami Vivekananda

“Thoughts Live.”  I have often thought “If someone opened up my forehead and could see into my mind, would they like my thoughts?

Thoughts

That will keep us pure.

 And it’s important.  Don’t think that just because you don’t say it, people don’t know it. They do. Spiritual intuition picks up on anything, everything.

 Think Positively, think Purely. And Life goes well!

 

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Swami Vivekananda (1863-1902): A spiritual genius of commanding intellect and power, Vivekananda crammed immense labor and achievement into his short life. Born in the Datta family of Calcutta, the youthful Vivekananda embraced the agnostic philosophies of the Western mind along with the worship of science.

Vivekananda was an Indian Hindu monk and chief disciple of the 19th-century saint Ramakrishna. He was a key figure in the introduction of the Indian philosophies of Vedanta and Yoga to the Western world and is credited with raising interfaith awareness, bringing Hinduism to the status of a major world religion during the late 19th century.  He is perhaps best known for his inspiring speech which began, “Sisters and brothers of America …,” in which he introduced Hinduism at the Parliament of the World’s Religions in Chicago in 1893.  After the Parliament of Religions, he toured many parts of the US as a guest. During a question-answer session at Brooklyn Ethical Society, he remarked— “I have a message to the West as Buddha had a message to the East.”  He conducted hundreds of public and private lectures and classes, disseminating tenets of Hindu philosophy in the United States, England and Europe. 

Six Steps to a Happy Life: How it Applies to [Groups] – Norman Vincent Peale

Norman Vincent Peale was a prolific positive thought leader and thinker.   Below he wrote steps on how to create a harmonious family life, but I think it applies to groups too, so I subbed “groups” for family below.  Awesome advice. Really think about each step; I’ve been studying this for two years… great counsel!  Enjoy

1. Let it begin with you. To begin the process, one person within the group, perhaps you, determines that he or she will create within himself the upbeat spirit that can rejuvenate the group.

2. Ask yourself: “Am I personally contributing to the group’s happiness or unhappiness?” Be sure to answer that question with absolute honesty.

3. Correct any hostility within yourself. Practice treating everyone in the group with love and respect for his opinion.

4. Act lovingly. Consider yourself a “love cell.” Do not tell the group you have decided to be this new way.  Just be it. This new spirit will affect the group and, in time, they will respond accordingly.

5. Practice holding every other group member, young or old, in esteem as persons. Even if the attitudes and actions of one are not entirely pleasant, identity of personality must always be respected. On this basis, the group will hold together and the basic love within it will create a climate of good will and real understanding. This fact alone will help to change your life in the group.

6. Do not wait for someone else to start changing. And do not expect that everyone is going to change at once, or that change will come easily. There may be long-held resentments that will diminish only gradually. The principle factor is that someone must start the change and then allow the momentum to grow.

The Pamela Positive: Positive Thoughts Become Your Words…

Positive thoughts become your Words… your Behavior… your Habits….your Values… and your Destiny. Read the full quote from Mahatma Gandhi:

“Keep your thoughts positive because your thoughts become your words. Keep your words positive because your words become your behavior. Keep your behavior positive because your behavior becomes your habits. Keep your habits positive because your habits become your values. Keep your values positive because your values become your destiny.”

Mahatma Gandhi was a political and spiritual leader during the Indian Independence movement.  He preached resistance through non-violence and mass civil disobedience. He led the Indian National Congress and advocated for the end of poverty and for women’s rights.