Tag Archives: poetry

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Oh Still, Small Voice Of Calm” – John Greenleaf Whittier

   

“Breathe through the pulses of our desire

Thy coolness and Thy balm;

Let sense be dumb, let flesh retire;

Speak through the earthquake, wind, and fire,

O still, small voice of calm!”

-John Greenleaf Whittier

 

photo-1494500764479-0c8f2919a3d8.jpeg

 

Dear Living and Giving readers… this is all we need today. Just a bit of calm. See where you can be and feel calm today.

Believing In Peace For You And For Us All,

Pamela

 


John Greenleaf Whittier (1807 – 1892) was an influential American Quaker poet and abolitionist. Highly regarded in his lifetime and after, he is remembered for his patriotic poems and a number of poems turned into hymns. Whittier grew up on a poor farm with a large extended family and little formal education. However, he was heavily influenced by Quaker ideologies of humanitarianism, compassion, and social responsibility, introduced to him by his father. He remained an outspoken proponent of abolitionism as a founding member of the American Anti-Slavery Society. Many of his early poems dealt with the cause of slavery. After the passage of the Thirteenth Amendment, Whittier turned to other forms of poetry; his most famous include Snow-Bound and Dear Lord and Father of Mankind. Starting around 1850, he also wrote folksy New England ballads and narrative poems, sentimental country idylls, and simple religious poems that appealed strongly to his readers.

Bio Source: Wikipedia, The Famous People  Fig¹. Photo by Ken Cheung on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “The Best Way Out Is Always Through” – Robert Frost

 

“The best way out is always through.”

― Robert Frost

 

Robert_Frost_NYWTS.jpg

 

Our dear Poet has practical advice for us… we must take a step forward. You might be facing a challenge but you must find the way through.

We don’t have to be overwhelmed… we can simply take one step. One step towards progress. One step towards harmony. One step towards resolution!

Thank you, Robert Frost, for simply encouraging us. You must take a step! And, you will make it through.

I’m Taking My Step,

Pamela

 


Robert Frost (1874-1963) was a highly-regarded poet known for his depiction of rural life. He published his first poem in high school. He attended Harvard and he received an honorary degree from Harvard posthumously, as well as more than 40 other honorary degrees. Though Frost grew up in the city, he lived on farms later in his life. He was a professor at Amherst College, and at Middlebury College for 42 years. Some of his best-known poems include “The Road Not Taken,” “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening,” and “Nothing Gold Can Stay.” Frost married Elinor Miriam White and they had six children.

This particular quote is from the poem “A Servant to Servants” (1914). Many of Frost’s poems explore the splendor of the outdoors. However, “A Servant to Servants” is a contrast to the typical Frostian nature poem. Its speaker is the wife of a hard-working farmer who feels trapped in her life that seems meaningless. She explains her monotonous daily routine. The poem is written in iambic pentameter, although it varies in meter with no apparent rhyme scheme. A constant symbol in this poem is nature representing freedom, but it is a freedom that the speaker cannot attain.

Bio Source: Wikipedia  Fig¹.  Photo from Wikimedia

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Oh Still, Small Voice Of Calm” – John Greenleaf Whittier

   

“Breathe through the pulses of our desire

Thy coolness and Thy balm;

Let sense be dumb, let flesh retire;

Speak through the earthquake, wind, and fire,

O still, small voice of calm!”

-John Greenleaf Whittier

 

photo-1494500764479-0c8f2919a3d8.jpeg

 

Dear Living and Giving readers… this is all we need today. Just a bit of calm. See where you can be and feel calm today.

Believing In Peace For You And For Us All,

Pamela


John Greenleaf Whittier (1807 – 1892) was an influential American Quaker poet and abolitionist. Highly regarded in his lifetime and after, he is remembered for his patriotic poems and a number of poems turned into hymns. Whittier grew up on a poor farm with a large extended family and little formal education. However, he was heavily influenced by Quaker ideologies of humanitarianism, compassion, and social responsibility, introduced to him by his father. He remained an outspoken proponent of abolitionism as a founding member of the American Anti-Slavery Society. Many of his early poems dealt with the cause of slavery. After the passage of the Thirteenth Amendment, Whittier turned to other forms of poetry; his most famous include Snow-Bound and Dear Lord and Father of Mankind. Starting around 1850, he also wrote folksy New England ballads and narrative poems, sentimental country idylls, and simple religious poems that appealed strongly to his readers.

Bio Source: Wikipedia, The Famous People  Fig¹. Photo by Ken Cheung on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Love Is Not Love Until Love’s Vulnerable” – Wisdom Inside a Chocolate Wrapper

 

“Love is not love until love’s vulnerable.” 

The Dream by Theodore Roethke,

as found on the inside of a Trader Joe’s chocolate bar wrapper

 

chocolates

 

Yes, wisdom can come in chocolate! Well, being vulnerable is important.  We show we care, show we want to learn, and grow in love. We love the other person more and we love ourselves more.

Be Vulnerable, Grow, Love!

Pamela


Theodore Roethke (1908-1963) was an American poet who won the Pulitzer Prize for poetry, for his book The Waking. His other best-known books include The Lost Son, The Far Field, and Words for the Wind. His poetry is noted for its rhythm, imagery and focus on nature.  He grew up in Saginaw, Michigan and his father was a German immigrant.  He received his B.A. and M.A. from the University of Michigan for English.  He went on to graduate school at Harvard College before he would leave to teach English at a number of universities. In 1953, Roethke married a former student, Beatrice O’Connell. Roethke is widely considered to be one of the most accomplished and influential poets of his time.  He taught poetry at the University of Washington for many years and was highly regarded by his colleagues and students.

Bio Source: Wikipedia  Fig¹. Photo by amirali mirhashemian on Unsplash

The Pamela Positive: “Nothing Can Outweigh a Love Filled Heart” – Heinrich Heine

 

Nothing Can Outweigh a Love Filled Heart.

 

“Of Pearls and Stars 

The pearly treasures of the sea,

The lights that spatter heaven above,

More precious than these wonders are 

My heart-of-hearts filled with your love. 

The ocean’s power, the heavenly sights 

Cannot outweigh a love filled heart. “

 -Heinrich Heine

 

person forming heart with their hands

 

What a lovely lesson from Heinrich Heine, an essayist from the 19th century.   He writes how love affects him personally, and how no matter how stunningly beautiful the sky, stars, and oceans, nothing overcomes love.

 

woman on bike reaching for man's hand behind her also on bike

 

While we can be grateful for the beautiful nature, we can be more grateful for all the beautiful love we have in our lives. There is someone who loves and you love. Hug them today. Don’t take them for granted!

Believe It Today!

Pamela

 


Heinrich Heine  (13 December 1797 – 17 February 1856) German poet and journalist, born at Düsseldorf, of Jewish parents, on the 13th of December 1797. His father, after various vicissitudes in business, had finally settled in Düsseldorf, and his mother, who possessed much energy of character, was the daughter of a physician of the same place. Heinrich was the eldest of four children, and received his education, first in private schools, then in the Lyceum of his native town; he acquired a knowledge of French and English, as well as some tincture of the classics and Hebrew. In October 1834 Heine made the acquaintance of a young Frenchwoman, Eugénie Mirat, a saleswoman in a boot-shop in Paris, and before long had fallen passionately in love with her. Although ill-educated, vain and extravagant, she inspired the poet with a deep and lasting affection.

As a prose writer, Heine’s merits were very great. His work was, in the main, journalism, but it was journalism of a high order, and, after all, the best literature of the “Young German” school to which he belonged was of this character. Heine’s light fancy, his agile intellect, his straightforward, clear style stood him here in excellent stead. The prose writings of his French period mark, together with Börne’s Briefe aus Paris, the beginning of a new era in German journalism and a healthy revolt against the unwieldly prose of the Romantic period.   

BioSource: NNDB

Fig¹. Photo by Tyler Nix on Unsplash

Fig². Photo by Everton Vila on Unsplash

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Oh Still, Small Voice of Calm” – John Greenleaf Whittier

   

“Breathe through the pulses of our desire

Thy coolness and Thy balm;

Let sense be dumb, let flesh retire;

Speak through the earthquake, wind, and fire,

O still, small voice of calm!”

-John Greenleaf Whittier

 

tree on body of water near mountains

 

Dear Living and Giving readers… this is all we need today. Just a bit of calm. See where you can be and feel calm today.

Believing in Peace for You and for Us All,

Pamela

 


John Greenleaf Whittier (1807 – 1892) was an influential American Quaker poet and abolitionist. Highly regarded in his lifetime and after, he is remembered for his patriotic poems and a number of poems turned into hymns. Whittier grew up on a poor farm with a large extended family and little formal education. However, he was heavily influenced by Quaker ideologies of humanitarianism, compassion, and social responsibility, introduced to him by his father. He remained an outspoken proponent of abolitionism as a founding member of the American Anti-Slavery Society. Many of his early poems dealt with the cause of slavery. After the passage of the Thirteenth Amendment, Whittier turned to other forms of poetry; his most famous include Snow-Bound and Dear Lord and Father of Mankind. Starting around 1850, he also wrote folksy New England ballads and narrative poems, sentimental country idylls, and simple religious poems that appealed strongly to his readers.

Bio Source: Wikipedia, The Famous People


Fig¹.  Photo by Ken Cheung on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Make My Life a Little Light” -M. Bentham-Edwards

 

Dear Living and Giving Readers,

Could you make your life a little light today? Find someone to help.

You can shine a little light in their lives. See how M. Bentham-Edwards encourages us to make our lives a light, a flower, a song, a staff.

You can do this today!

 

macro photography of heart shape sand decor

 

Light Someone’s Life Up Today,

Pamela

 

“God make my life a little light, Within the world to glow; A tiny flame that burneth bright 

  Wherever I may go. 

God make my life a little flower, 

  That giveth joy to all, 

Content to bloom in native bower,

  Although its place be small. 

God make my life a little song,

  That comforteth the sad;

That helpeth others to be strong,

  And makes the singer glad. 

God make my life a little staff, 

  Whereon the weak may rest, 

That so what health and strength I have 

  May serve my neighbors best.”

―M. Bentham-Edwards

 


Betham-Edwards was the fourth daughter of a farmer, Edward Edwards (c.1808–1864) and his wife Barbara (1806–1848), daughter of William Betham (1749–1839), an antiquary and cleric. She was educated in Ipswich country and as a governess-pupil at a school in London.

Her first novel, The White House by the Sea (1857) was an immediate success. Matilda studied French and German abroad and then settled with her sister in Suffolk to manage the farm which had belonged to her father. Not content with purely rural occupations, she contributed from time to time to Household Words, having the advantage at this time of the friendship of Charles Dickens and an early association with Charles and Mary Lamb, friends of her mother. Betham-Edwards is often cited in anthologies of lesbian poetry, but there is no strong evidence that she had lesbian tendencies. She died in Hastings, Sussex in 1919.  

BioSource: Wikipedia

Fig. ₁: Photo by Steve Halama on Unsplash