Tag Archives: poems

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Make My Life a Little Light” -M. Bentham-Edwards

 

Dear Living and Giving Readers,

Could you make your life a little light today? Find someone to help.

You can shine a little light in their lives. See how M. Bentham-Edwards encourages us to make our lives a light, a flower, a song, a staff.

You can do this today!

 

macro photography of heart shape sand decor

 

Light Someone’s Life Up Today,

Pamela

 

“God make my life a little light, Within the world to glow; A tiny flame that burneth bright 

  Wherever I may go. 

God make my life a little flower, 

  That giveth joy to all, 

Content to bloom in native bower,

  Although its place be small. 

God make my life a little song,

  That comforteth the sad;

That helpeth others to be strong,

  And makes the singer glad. 

God make my life a little staff, 

  Whereon the weak may rest, 

That so what health and strength I have 

  May serve my neighbors best.”

―M. Bentham-Edwards

 


Betham-Edwards was the fourth daughter of a farmer, Edward Edwards (c.1808–1864) and his wife Barbara (1806–1848), daughter of William Betham (1749–1839), an antiquary and cleric. She was educated in Ipswich country and as a governess-pupil at a school in London.

Her first novel, The White House by the Sea (1857) was an immediate success. Matilda studied French and German abroad and then settled with her sister in Suffolk to manage the farm which had belonged to her father. Not content with purely rural occupations, she contributed from time to time to Household Words, having the advantage at this time of the friendship of Charles Dickens and an early association with Charles and Mary Lamb, friends of her mother. Betham-Edwards is often cited in anthologies of lesbian poetry, but there is no strong evidence that she had lesbian tendencies. She died in Hastings, Sussex in 1919.  

BioSource: Wikipedia

Fig. ₁: Photo by Steve Halama on Unsplash

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Civility Is The Behavior That Marks…Share Common, Public, and Political Space” – Daniel Mendelsohn

 

“Civility is the behavior that marks mutual acknowledgement that we individuals share common, public, and political space. Think about the platforms through which you interact with people all day, the media that we call social, but if anything, have enhanced our ability to be asocial.

To screen every element of society, culture and politics that doesn’t suit or flatter or soothe us; thereby, removing the necessity for civility in the first place.”

―Daniel Mendelsohn

 

Graciousness, goodness, civility—all of this helps us to maintain a sense of calm and peace. Did you know anxiety is one of the most prevalent challenges we face in the U.S.? Nearly one 1/5 of our population experiences it. Yet only 1/3 try to find help.1 They are hurting… and continue to hurt. 

 

man wearing knit cap on grey background

 

Where do we think this anxiety is coming from? First, it’s coming from disconnectedness. We aren’t really getting the nurturance and love that we need from one-on-one interactions. And those interactions need to be with people we don’t know, and with people we do.

With people we do know, we build upon positive loving actions that make them become habit and security. With people we don’t know, it enforces the need to extend ourselves, to spread love and to give back. Both are essential.

 

kira-auf-der-heide-475623-unsplash (1) (1) (1).jpg

 

If we want more civility, that means that we need to slow down. If we want more civility, that means less screen time. If we want more civility, that means that we care and express our love for more people. It’s that simple. And who doesn’t want to love more? So let’s try.

May you live a civil day today, may you live it with care for everyone in every word that you give out, in every touch, and every comment that you make. And in every thought, so that in our minds and in our actions, civility becomes the natural way again.

 

naassom-azevedo-541451-unsplash (1) (1) (1).jpg

 

How we all long for graciousness and civility!

With Graciousness,

Pamela

 


Daniel Mendelsohn is a classist, writer, and critic. A graduate of Princeton’s graduate school, he published work on Euripidean tragedy before he went on to become a contributor to publications such as The New York TimesOutThe Nation and more. He was born in Long Island and raised in Old Bethage, New York. He received his undergraduate degree at the University of Virginia in Classics. He writes reviews on books, films, theater and television. He has won Princeton University’s James Madison Medal in 2018, American Philological Association President’s Award for service to the Classics in 2014 and the American Academy of Arts and Letters award for Prose Style in 2014. Currently, he is a professor at Bard College. He is also the director of the Robert B. Silvers Foundation, which supports writers. In his free time, Mendelsohn enjoys watching television and going to the movie theater. He has two children and four siblings, including a brother who is a film director, another brother who is a photographer and a sister who is a journalist.

Bio Source: Wikipedia, Daniel Mendelsohn Official Website


Citations:

1 “Facts & Statistics”, Anxiety and Depression Association of America, https://adaa.org/about-adaa/press-room/facts-statistics

Fig¹.  Photo by Andrew Neel on Unsplash

Fig². Photo by Kira auf der Heide on Unsplash

Fig³. Photo by Naassom Azevedo on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “The Greatest Mind is Always the Simplest.” – Russell Conwell

 

 

Now, the greatest mind is always the simplest.

Did you ever see a really great man?

Great in the best and truest sense?

If so, you could walk right up to him and say:

“How are you, Jim?”

 

—Russell Conwell

 

 

selective focus photo of man waving in vehicle

 

 

That’s right. The most amazing people are warm and accessible to all. That’s because they know everyone has a beautiful gift to give, and no one is greater. The greatest gift is being open and loving.

 

 


Russell Conwell (February 15, 1843 – December 6, 1925) was an American Baptist minister, orator, philanthropist, lawyer, and writer. He is best remembered as the founder and first president of Temple University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and for his inspirational lecture Acres of Diamonds. The son of Massachusetts farmers, Conwell attended Yale University and after graduating enlisted in the Union Army during the American Civil War. He was ordained as a Baptist minister in 1880, and delivered his famous speech “Acres of Diamonds” over 6,000 times around the world. The central idea of the work is that one need not look elsewhere for opportunity, achievement, or fortune – the resources to achieve all good things are present in one’s own community. Conwell’s capacity to establish Temple University and his other civic projects largely derived from the income that he earned from the speech. The published version has been regarded as a classic of New Thought literature since the 1870s.

Bio source: Wikipedia


Citation:

Fig¹. JuniperPhoton on Unsplash

The Pamela Positive: Nothing Can Outweigh A Love Filled Heart – Heinrich Heine

 

 

“Nothing Can Outweigh a Love Filled Heart.”

 

“Of Pearls and Stars 

The pearly treasures of the sea,

The lights that spatter heaven above,

More precious than these wonders are 

My heart-of-hearts filled with your love. 

The ocean’s power, the heavenly sights 

Cannot outweigh a love filled heart. “

 -Heinrich Heine

 

 

person forming heart with their hands

 

 

What a lovely lesson from Heinrich Heine, an essayist from the 19th century.   He writes how love affects him personally, and how no matter how stunningly beautiful the sky, stars, and oceans, nothing overcomes love.

 

 

woman on bike reaching for man's hand behind her also on bike

 

 

While we can be grateful for the beautiful nature, we can be more grateful for all the beautiful love we have in our lives.  There is someone who loves and you love. Hug them today. Don’t take them for granted!

Believe it Today!

Pamela

 

 


Heinrich Heine  (13 December 1797 – 17 February 1856) German poet and journalist, born at Düsseldorf, of Jewish parents, on the 13th of December 1797. His father, after various vicissitudes in business, had finally settled in Düsseldorf, and his mother, who possessed much energy of character, was the daughter of a physician of the same place. Heinrich was the eldest of four children, and received his education, first in private schools, then in the Lyceum of his native town; he acquired a knowledge of French and English, as well as some tincture of the classics and Hebrew. In October 1834 Heine made the acquaintance of a young Frenchwoman, Eugénie Mirat, a saleswoman in a boot-shop in Paris, and before long had fallen passionately in love with her. Although ill-educated, vain and extravagant, she inspired the poet with a deep and lasting affection.

As a prose writer, Heine’s merits were very great. His work was, in the main, journalism, but it was journalism of a high order, and, after all, the best literature of the “Young German” school to which he belonged was of this character. Heine’s light fancy, his agile intellect, his straightforward, clear style stood him here in excellent stead. The prose writings of his French period mark, together with Börne’s Briefe aus Paris, the beginning of a new era in German journalism and a healthy revolt against the unwieldly prose of the Romantic period.   

BioSource: NNDB

Citation:
Fig. ¹: Photo by Tyler Nix on Unsplash
Fig. ²: Photo by Everton Vila on Unsplash

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: Make Criticism Yield to You

 

 

 

 

“Against criticism a man can neither protest nor defend himself;

he must act in spite of it, and then it will gradually yield to him.”

–Johan Wolfgang von Goethe

 

 

 

feedback

 

 

No matter how hard it is, we have to face challenging feedback and take some step of action. It’s not easy… but the more we do it, the more we become accustomed to it.   To being honest with ourselves… and to overcoming the challenge. We grow, we excel, and we move on, up and over it. With that honesty, as Goethe states, “(the criticism) will gradually yield to him.”

 

 


Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749-1832) was a German writer and artist, and a leading figure in German literature.  His works include The Sorrows of Young Werther and Faust. He was highly influential to the 19th century. 

Pamela Positive: Make My Life a Little Light

 

 

Dear Living and Giving Readers,

 

Could you make your life a little light today? Find someone to help.

You can shine a little light in their lives.   See how M. Bentham-Edwards encourages us to make our lives a light, a flower, a song, a staff.

You can do this today!

 

 

macro photography of heart shape sand decor

 

 

Light Someone’s Life Up Today,

 

Pamela

 

“God make my life a little light,   Within the world to glow; 

A tiny flame that burneth bright 

  Wherever I may go. 

God make my life a little flower, 

  That giveth joy to all, 

Content to bloom in native bower,

  Although its place be small. 

God make my life a little song,

  That comforteth the sad;

That helpeth others to be strong,

  And makes the singer glad. 

God make my life a little staff, 

  Whereon the weak may rest, 

That so what health and strength I have 

  May serve my neighbors best.”

-M. Bentham-Edwards

 


Betham-Edwards was the fourth daughter of a farmer, Edward Edwards (c.1808–1864) and his wife Barbara (1806–1848), daughter of William Betham (1749–1839), an antiquary and cleric. She was educated in Ipswich country and as a governess-pupil at a school in London.

Her first novel, The White House by the Sea (1857) was an immediate success. Matilda studied French and German abroad and then settled with her sister in Suffolk to manage the farm which had belonged to her father. Not content with purely rural occupations, she contributed from time to time to Household Words, having the advantage at this time of the friendship of Charles Dickens and an early association with Charles and Mary Lamb, friends of her mother. Betham-Edwards is often cited in anthologies of lesbian poetry, but there is no strong evidence that she had lesbian tendencies. She died in Hastings, Sussex in 1919.  

BioSource: Wikipedia

Citation:

Fig. ₁: Photo by Steve Halama on Unsplash

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Civility Is The Behavior That Marks…Share Common, Public, and Political Space” – Daniel Mendelsohn

 

 

“Civility is the behavior that marks mutual acknowledgement that we individuals share common, public, and political space. Think about the platforms through which you interact with people all day, the media that we call social, but if anything, have enhanced our ability to be asocial.

To screen every element of society, culture and politics that doesn’t suit or flatter or soothe us; thereby, removing the necessity for civility in the first place.”

–       Daniel Mendelsohn

 

 

Graciousness, goodness, civility—all of this helps us to maintain a sense of calm and peace. Did you know anxiety is one of the most prevalent challenges we face in the U.S.? Nearly one 1/5 of our population experiences it. Yet only 1/3 try to find help.1 They are hurting… and continue to hurt. 

 

 

aaron-burden-527200-unsplash (1) (1) (1).jpg

 

 

Where do we think this anxiety is coming from? First, it’s coming from disconnectedness. We aren’t really getting the nurturance and love that we need from one-on-one interactions. And those interactions need to be with people we don’t know, and with people we do.

 

With people we do know, we build upon positive loving actions that make them become habit and security. With people we don’t know, it enforces the need to extend ourselves, to spread love and to give back. Both are essential.

 

 

kira-auf-der-heide-475623-unsplash (1) (1) (1).jpg

 

 

If we want more civility, that means that we need to slow down. If we want more civility, that means less screen time. If we want more civility, that means that we care and express our love for more people. It’s that simple. And who doesn’t want to love more? So let’s try.

 

May you live a civil day today, may you live it with care for everyone in every word that you give out, in every touch, and every comment that you make. And in every thought, so that in our minds and in our actions, civility becomes the natural way again.

 

 

naassom-azevedo-541451-unsplash (1) (1) (1).jpg

 

How we all long for graciousness and civility!

With Graciousness,

Pamela

 


 

 

Daniel Mendelsohn is a classist, writer, and critic. A graduate of Princeton’s graduate school, he published work on Euripidean tragedy before he went on to become a contributor to publications such as The New York TimesOutThe Nation and more. He was born in Long Island and raised in Old Bethage, New York. He received his undergraduate degree at the University of Virginia in Classics. He writes reviews on books, films, theater and television. He has won Princeton University’s James Madison Medal in 2018, American Philological Association President’s Award for service to the Classics in 2014 and the American Academy of Arts and Letters award for Prose Style in 2014. Currently, he is a professor at Bard College. He is also the director of the Robert B. Silvers Foundation, which supports writers. In his free time, Mendelsohn enjoys watching television and going to the movie theater. He has two children and four siblings, including a brother who is a film director, another brother who is a photographer and a sister who is a journalist.