Tag Archives: peace of mind

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Be Clear About What Is Truly Essential”

 

Marine corps officer Robert J. Wicks shares with us some important lessons on life and nature.

Rather than read, he encourages us to reflect.  If we face a challenge, we can act not from anger but from joy and grounded peace.

 

 

sunset-1207326_1280.jpg

 

 

From his book, Streams of Contentment, here are three tips on living a natural, and successful life.

* Be clear about what is truly essential.

* Appreciate everything and everyone in your life right now.

* Recognize that a little silence and solitude is no small thing.

– Robert J. Wicks

When we appreciate what is important, right now, we honor life and everyone around us.

 

 


 

 

 

Robert J. Wicks is a clinical psychologist and author, interested in how spirituality and psychology are intertwined. He graduated from Fairfield University in Connecticut in 1968, with a B.A. in psychology and philosophy. He later went on to receive his PhD in psychology from Hahnemann Medical College and Hospital, now known as Drexel University Medical College. Wicks has taught at a number of universities, given commencement speeches, and presented to Congress. In the 1990s, he worked with relief workers, who were working in Rwanda during the civil war. He has also worked with professionals who support Iraqi and Afghan war veterans in the early 2000s. Throughout his career, he has published over 40 books inspired by his studies into psychology and spirituality. Wicks has received a number of awards including the The Humanitarian Award Association for Spiritual, Ethical, Religious and Value Issues in Counseling American Counseling Association. He has been married to his wife, Michaele Barry Wicks, for over 40 years and they have one daughter together.

 

 

 

The Pamela Positive: “Be Clear About What Is Truly Essential”

sunset-1207326_1280.jpg

Marine corps officer Robert J. Wicks shares with us some important lessons on life and nature.

Rather than read, he encourages us to reflect.  If we face a challenge, we can act not from anger but from joy and grounded peace.

From his book, Streams of Contentment, here are three tips on living a natural, and successful life.

* Be clear about what is truly essential.

* Appreciate everything and everyone in your life right now.

* Recognize that a little silence and solitude is no small thing.

– Robert J. Wicks

When we appreciate what is important, right now, we honor life and everyone around us.

Robert J. Wicks was a Marine corps officer in Vietnam.  He is the author of more than 40 books, urging an appreciation of nature, inspired by his family’s 78 acres of forests and open fields.

The Pamela Positive: May Your Work Bring Just and Lasting Peace

President Lincoln advised us,

“Whatever work you are devoted to….may it bring just and lasting peace.”

 

lincoln.jpeg

 

Our respected President Abraham Lincoln brought this to light in his 1865  Inaugural Address. What a calling for each of us to think on, as we go about our work each day, how it can bring “just and lasting peace.”  I think work here is not just our professional work, but any task to which we are devoting ourselves. Any project, endeavor, activity — from raising a child to decorating a Valentine’s Day wreath — can have kindness, justice and peace as a necessary ingredient to our performing of it.

President Lincoln says something instrumental here: As we strive for our goal, it should be peace brought between each one of us, and then also with all countries.

The point here is that gentle justice, no matter how small, and a caring, kind sense of peacefulness in all our interactions, both bring that sense of worldwide peace. And it must start with ourselves, our conversations, our actions between each person we meet. That’s a great calling for us in today’s world!

***

Abraham Lincoln served as the 16th President of the United States during the Civil War. He was instrumental in ending slavery with his Emancipation Proclamation and is admired for his commitment to national unity, equal rights, liberty, and democracy in America. Lincoln was born in Hodgenville, Kentucky to a humble home; he was later elected to the Illinois state legislature (1834) before entering into the U.S. House of Representatives (1847) and then becoming President of the United States (1860). Lincoln’s bynames include those of “Honest Abe,” “the Rail-Splitter,” and “the Great Emancipator.”

The Pamela Positive: Peyton March on Obtaining the Things We Crave Most

There is a wonderful mythical law that the three things we crave most in life – happiness, freedom, and peace of mind – are always attained by giving them to someone else.” – Peyton March

hand-2000354_1280Peyton Conway March (December 27, 1864 -1955) was an American soldier and Army Chief of Staff.  He had enormous influence in preparing America for World War I, and was highly committed to upholding freedom.

March was the son of Francis Andrew March, who was a founder of modern comparative linguistics in English.  He was among the first professors to advocate English be taught in universities.

Peyton March fought in the Philippines during the Spanish-American War.  During the Russo-Japanese War, he traveled as an American military attaché with the Japanese army, and he also worked with General MacArthur.  March was promoted to brigadier general during World War I, and later to Army Chief of Staff.

The Pamela Positive: Peyton March on Obtaining the Things We Crave Most – Give

There is a wonderful mythical law that the three things we crave most in life – happiness, freedom, and peace of mind – are always attained by giving them to someone else.” – Peyton March

Peyton Conway March (December 27, 1864 -1955) was an American soldier and Army Chief of Staff.  He had enormous influence in preparing America for World War I, and was highly committed to upholding freedom.

March was the son of Francis Andrew March, who was a founder of modern comparative linguistics in English.  He was among the first professors to advocate English be taught in universities.

Peyton March fought in the Philippines during the Spanish-American War.  During the Russo-Japanese War, he traveled as an American military attaché with the Japanese army, and he also worked with General MacArthur.  March was promoted to brigadier general during World War I, and later to Army Chief of Staff.

“There is a wonderful mythical law of nature…” – General Peyton C. March

vienna-88369_1280.jpg

“There is a wonderful mythical law of nature that the three things we crave most in life – happiness, freedom, and peace of mind – are always attained by giving them to someone else.” – Gen Peyton C. March


General March had to fight – and kill – for freedom. It’s a sad moment when we come to that. In just the 20th century alone, there were more than 50 wars. By some estimates more than 160 million people have been killed in those 100 years. Unfortunately, sometimes we have to fight for the freedom we love.


Yet General Peyton also knew a deeper truth. The best thing we can give someone is peace. It’s happiness. It’s freedom.


We can build a different future. Let’s give others the gift of freedom and happiness in a peaceful way.


 
220px-Peyton_C._March


General Peyton Conway March was born on December 27, 1864 in Easton, Pennsylvania. As the son of an academic, General March received a full education, graduating from Lafayette College in 1884 with a major in classics before attending the United States Military Academy at West Point.

General March proved himself to be a leader early on in his career during the Battle of Manila in 1898. This accomplishment allowed him to move up in the ranks and become the army chief of staff during World War I in 1918. He established the primacy of the chief of staff in the army hierarchy. His duties included presiding over the buildup of American forces in World War I,  centralizing control over supply, creating an Air Service, Tank Corps, and Chemical Warfare Service, and supervising the demobilization at war’s end. His actions played a large role in designing the powerful position of the chief of staff in the 20th century.

Frederick Palmer, a famous war correspondent during this time period, was amazed by March’s ability to focus on tasks. In turn, March expected this type of razor focus from his men. While working with him, most officers worked longer hours and increased overall efficiency. Although some people describe General March as a know-it-all, his leadership skills were never affected by his pride.

He retired as a Major General in 1921, and was advanced to General on the retired list. He had married Cora V. McEntee in 1923. He died in Washington, D.C. on 13 April 1955, and was buried with full military honors in Arlington National Cemetery

The Classic Pamela Positive: Peyton March on Obtaining the Things We Crave Most – Give

There is a wonderful mythical law that the three things we crave most in life – happiness, freedom, and peace of mind – are always attained by giving them to someone else.” – Peyton March

Peyton Conway March (December 27, 1864 -1955) was an American soldier and Army Chief of Staff.  He had enormous influence in preparing America for World War I, and was highly committed to upholding freedom.

March was the son of Francis Andrew March, who was a founder of modern comparative linguistics in English.  He was among the first professors to advocate English be taught in universities.

Peyton March fought in the Philippines during the Spanish-American War.  During the Russo-Japanese War, he traveled as an American military attaché with the Japanese army, and he also worked with General MacArthur.  March was promoted to brigadier general during World War I, and later to Army Chief of Staff.