Tag Archives: passion

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Make Each Day Your Masterpiece.” – John Wooden

 

“Make each day your masterpiece.”

— John Wooden

 

Photo of Woman Raising Both Hands

 

Unmatched. That’s what Coach John Wooden is asking us to be.

To live a life unmatched each day — which is a masterpiece — means living according to your values.

When I usually think about a gargantuan goal, I think of something more along the lines of an Olympian. Yet it doesn’t always mean running (or winning) a marathon.

It is being your own masterpiece. That means today, you live with kindness in all the minute interactions you might have. It’s not just about doing your best, yet also treating others your best. You, your being and presence, are the kind masterpiece that positively affects the world.

From living your masterpiece as an individual, and on this basis of values — only then can you paint another masterpiece. Pick a passion… be it gardening, being an excellent bookkeeper, being elected to office, writing a short story, exploring the best hikes and appreciating nature… And step by step, create excellence. Get inducted into your own hall of fame.

But remember, the greatest hall of fame is… treating others your best.

 


John Robert Wooden (October 14, 1910 – June 4, 2010) was an American basketball coach. He was a member of the Basketball Hall of Fame as both a player (inducted in 1961) and as a coach (inducted in 1973). He was the first person ever enshrined in both categories. His ten NCAA national championships in a 12-year period while at UCLA are unmatched by any other college basketball coach. He was married to Nellie Riley for 53 years, and they had two children. After Nellie’s death, John had a monthly ritual until his own death 25 years later, of visiting her grave and writing her a love letter.

Bio Source: Wikipedia


Fig¹.  Photo by Daniel Reche on Pexels

 

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: “We Were Born to Succeed, Not to Fail.” – Henry David Thoreau

 

“We were born to succeed, not to fail.”

– Henry David Thoreau

 

man sitting on mountain cliff facing white clouds rising one hand at golden hour

 

 

That is our life purpose. To follow our calling in our own specially designed way. And so we will succeed, because the measurement is solely on how you uniquely pursue your talents, goals and qualities. Everyone has a different picture of success, his or her own beautiful expression.

 

 

I Love Your Expression,

Pamela

 


Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) was an author, philosopher, poet, abolitionist, and naturalist. He grew up in Massachusetts, into the “modest New England family” of John Thoreau, a pencil maker, and Cynthia Dunbar. He had two older siblings, Helen and John Jr., and a younger sister, Sophia. Thoreau’s birthplace still exists on Virginia Road in Concord. He studied at Harvard College between 1833 and 1837.

After college, he opened a grammar school with his brother in Concord, Massachusetts. During this time, he met Ralph Waldo Emerson who introduced him to other writers and encouraged him to publish his thoughts. He is the author of Walden, which is a philosophical argument for simple living and preservation of natural environment.  He also had other important writings on natural history, environmentalism and civil disobedience.

Biosource: Wikipedia


Citation:
Fig¹.Photo by Ian Stauffer on Unsplash

Leadership Series: Mario Andretti’s Fast Lane To America, Part Four of Four

 

 

This is Part Four of Four in the Series on “Mario Andretti’s Fast Lane to America”.  Please click these links to read parts One, Two, and Three.

 

 

Thank you for joining me on this Leadership Series: How To Become a Leader; Practical Steps to Following Your Passion.

 

We’ve seen world-renowned car racer Mario Andretti follow his passion since he was a teenager, and become an award-winning driver! He’s stayed grounded, family-oriented and still involved with his passion of cars.

 

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What do you do next?

 

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You can give back.

Successful people find a way to help others, because they know they have been helped.

No one does it alone.

And that’s what he does!

On philanthropy, Mario states:

 

“You try to channel it in areas where you know it’s going to make a difference,” he said. “You try to do those things as the opportunity comes along. These are all the things that at the end of the day, it makes you feel good that I made a little bit of a difference, and that’s meaningful.”6

 

Mario gives back through Meals on Wheels, to help the elderly and housebound attain food security. In honor of Mario, we are also giving back — we’ve chosen Nepal Orphans Home Inc. project for fresh food and Rural Communities Empowerment Center’s project to bring technology and resources to communities in great need. In that way we honor his passion and his philanthropy.

 

Thank you joining us on our Leadership Series: How To Become a Leader; Practical Steps to Following Your Passion.

 

We are so glad you joined us in learning about Mario Andretti’s successful life. If it a world class race driver can make it by starting out in a refugee camp, you can too. Follow your passion, gain experience and then give back.

 

I thank you for being the great leader you are, and look forward to you sharing your journey! We will all look forward to hearing!

 

You’re Leading,

Pamela

 

 


 

Mario Andretti is an extremely successful race car driver and the only race car driver to have ever won the Indianapolis 500, the Daytona 500, and the Formula One World Championship. Mario, and his fraternal twin brother Aldo, were born in the former territory known as Istria. At the end of World War II, the territory was annexed by Yugoslovia and the Andretti family left in 1948 during what’s known as the Istrian exodus. They ended up in a refugee camp in Lucca, Italy, where his father would work hard labor jobs before they received the visa to join his uncle in Pennsylvania. Mario and his brother Aldo rebuilt a 1948 Hudson Commodore and began racing it. Aldo won the coin toss to do the first race and he won. Aldo went on to fracture his skull in a serious crash, but he would return later on. In 1969, Aldo suffered severe damage after crashing into a fence during an IMCA race and he quit racing.

 

In 1961, he married Dee Ann Andretti and they had three children together. Their two sons, Jeff and Michael, would also become race car drivers. Following Mario’s retirement, he has spent his time in a multitude of ways—including volunteering with Meals on Wheels deliveries in Pennsylvania. With his late wife Dee Ann, he was also involved with a number of local children’s charities.

 


Citations:
⁶ Ryan, Natem “Mario Andretti saluted for his charity work: ‘I love positive’”, NBC Sports, April 14, 2015, https://motorsports.nbcsports.com/2015/04/14/mario-andretti-saluted-for-his-charity-work-i-love-positives/
Fig. ¹⁰: Photo by Jim Culp retrieved from Flickr, https://www.flickr.com/photos/jimculp/29455644593
Fig. ¹¹: Photo by William on Unsplash

Leadership Series: Mario Andretti’s Fast Lane To America, Part Three of Four

 

 

This is Part Three of Four in the Series on “Mario Andretti’s Fast Lane to America”.  Please click these links to read parts One and Two.

 

 

Thank you for joining our Leadership Series: How To Become a Leader     

 

We feature real-life stories on how people became successful leaders, so you can too. We show you Practical Steps and Stories to Following Your Passion, leading you to your own success. Our feature today is on Mario Andretti, a world-class racer who started out in a refugee camp. Join us as we continue to explore his life story!

 

Within 20 years, Mario was a world-renowned racer. He was living his dream, and in America. He was married with children and awards and all. What to do next?

 

Beautifully and interestingly enough, Mario stayed true to his roots. He still lives in Nazareth, Pennsylvania and still spends time in his garages. He stays humble. He stays grounded. He still loves his cars. His life is very consistent.

 

 

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“I love spending time in the garages on either side of our house. I have 9 cars in all, including a Lamborghini and a Corvette.”5

 

So that’s a good lesson. Even when he can retire, he still pays attention to his cars.  He takes care of them and loves them and drives them.

 

 

andretti 3.jpg

 

 

He drives to his passion and his passion drives his life.   It’s a great life partnership, one can have with one’s passion for one’s entire life!

 

You can do this too. You call follow your passion, and live your full life.

 

 

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What a beautiful story. Let’s find our passion, and stay true to humble dreams. They will happen!

 

Dreams are happening for you,

Pamela

 

 

Stay tuned for Part Four of the Four Part Series “Mario Andretti’s Fast Lane to America” tomorrow!

 


Citations:
⁵ Mybers, Marc, Ibid.
Fig. ⁷: Photo by Raul Varzar on Unsplash
Fig. ⁸: Racingone/ ISC Archives via Getty Images, retrieved from https://www.mcall.com/sports/motorracing/mc-mario-andretti-indy500-1981-unser-20160512-story.html
Fig. ⁹: Photo by chuttersnap on Unsplash

 

 

Leadership Series: Mario Andretti’s Fast Lane To America, Part Two of Four

 

 

This is Part Two of Four in the Series on “Mario Andretti’s Fast Lane to America”. Please click here to start from the beginning!

 

Thank you for joining our Leadership Series: How To Become a Leader     

 

We feature real-life stories on how people became successful leaders, so you can too. We show you Practical Steps and Stories to Following Your Passion, leading you to your own success. Our feature today is on Mario Andretti, a world-class racer who started out in a refugee camp. Join us as we continue to explore his life story!

 

The Mario Andretti family was on its way from war-torn Italy to America.  They had been working in car shops, learning, gaining experience. Heads-down, hands-in-car-parts operations. Learning, learning, learning. With perseverance, they followed their dreams.

 

 

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With patience, visas came three years later. Their family migrated to Pennsylvania where family resided. Always an observer, after dinner one night in Pennsylvania, Mario and his brother saw something flashing in the distance as well as loud sounds. They soon found it was their love! It was the explosion of a car engine!

 

 

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They literally ran towards their passion, which was about a mile away and featured a racetrack. They had a high-end taste in cars due to being from Italy and their work on Formula 1 cars. While these cars were different, the boys kept showing up at the track. Experience built upon experience. It was time to build their own car for the first time: a 1948 Hudson Commodore.

 

To get in at the race track, they stated they were 19 and 21 years old, racers from Italy. Soon, Aldo and his brother, Mario, each won two of the first four stock-car races. 4 They won nearly $150 and used that to build their next car.5 Their passion was on their way! Instead of working on cars, they were now building them — and racing them!  

 

 

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Now Mario is considered one of the top race car drivers in the world. He’s won the 1978 Formula One World Championship races and most specifically, the top IndyCar race, 4 times. He’s known for being the only driver to win the NASCAR Cup Series, Formula One and an Indianapolis 500.

 

 

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So you can follow your passion, too, and realize success. Mario is a good man, and he did it. You can be a good person, and you can do it.

 

Follow Passion = Realize Success,

Pamela

 

 

Stay tuned for Part Three of the Four Part Series “Mario Andretti’s Fast Lane to America” tomorrow!

 

 


Citations:
³ Myers, Marc “Mario Andretti: From Italian Refugee Camp to the Winner’s Circle at Indy”, The Wall Street Journal, July 31, 2018, https://www.wsj.com/articles/how-mario-andretti-one-of-the-fastest-americans-ever-discovered-his-speed-1533047673
Fig. ³: Photo by Vance Osterhout on Unsplash
Fig. ⁴: Photo by Oscar Sutton on Unsplash
Fig. ⁵: Photo by MiRo Am on Unsplash
Fig. ⁶: Amy Hollowbush, contributed photo retrieved from https://www.mcall.com/sports/motorracing/mc-mario-andretti-daytona-500-5020170221-story.html

Leadership Series: Mario Andretti’s Fast Lane to America, Part One of Four

 

 

This is Part One of Four in the Series on “Mario Andretti’s Fast Lane to America”.

 

Thank you for joining our Leadership Series: How To Become a Leader     

 

We feature real-life stories on how people became successful leaders, so you can too. We show you Practical Steps and Stories to Following Your Passion, leading you to your own success. Our feature today is on Mario Andretti, a world-class racer who started out in a refugee camp. Join us as we explore his life story!

 

Before Mario Andretti first came to America, his life wasn’t glamorous. His family of six was housed in a couple of rooms in a college dormitory in a refugee camp in Italy, right at the end of World War II. 

 

 

bailey-scully-519805-unsplash.jpg

 

 

His uncle was able to find a job for his father at a cement factory and so they came over to America.Mario was grateful to be in America and felt life could only go up.

 

 

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While his father was applying for the visa to come to America, he and his brother, Aldo, happened to be playing in a cul-de-sac. One day they saw some cars speeding by. They were able to locate them at a local car shop in a parking garage across from where they lived.

 

The Andretti brothers had the courage to go and meet the owners. And really, that was the start of their dreams. They went to help, observe and eventually work on cars there after school.For a start, they were allowed to park them in garage. Even this gave him a feel and love of cars. He and his brother Aldo continued to work at the shop and obtained a strong love for Italian cars. Unbeknownst to the brothers they would in the future attend races such as the 1954 Italian Grand Prix, and win races such as Daytona.

 

What an amazing pursuit of one’s dreams.

 

They saw cars.

 

They explored.

 

They followed their interests.

 

They met the owners.

 

They offered to help.

 

They were on their way to becoming world class racers by doing the above. Above doesn’t sound overly exciting or world class, but it’s following your passion, offering help, getting experience. That’s how you achieve your dreams! It’s that simple! And, that much daily, hard work.

 

So let’s watch this story closely.  Humble backgrounds and they followed a lead about which they were excited. You can do this, too!  This could be you start to being a successful engineer, the first woman flutist in South Congo, a first-time CEO or a new entrepreneur. You can do it, too.

 

You can do it, too.

Pamela

 

 

Stay tuned for Part Two of the Four Part Series “Mario Andretti’s Fast Lane to America” tomorrow!

 


Citations:
1 Myers, Marc “Mario Andretti: From Italian Refugee Camp to the Winner’s Circle at Indy”, The Wall Street Journal, July 31, 2018, https://www.wsj.com/articles/how-mario-andretti-one-of-the-fastest-americans-ever-discovered-his-speed-1533047673
² Ibid.
Fig.1: Photo by Bailey Scully on Unsplash
Fig.2: Photo by Matt Antonioli on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Make Each Day Your Masterpiece.” – John Wooden

 

“Make each day your masterpiece.”

— John Wooden

 

 

 

woman-591576_1280

 

 

Unmatched. That’s what Coach John Wooden is asking us to be.

To live a life unmatched each day — which is a masterpiece — means living according to your values.

When I usually think about a gargantuan goal, I think of something more along the lines of an Olympian. Yet it doesn’t always mean running (or winning) a marathon.

It is being your own masterpiece. That means today, you live with kindness in all the minute interactions you might have. It’s not just about doing your best, yet also treating others your best.  You, your being and presence, are the kind masterpiece that positively affects the world.

From living your masterpiece as an individual, and on this basis of values — only then can you paint another masterpiece. Pick a passion… be it gardening, being an excellent bookkeeper, being elected to office, writing a short story, exploring the best hikes and appreciating nature… And step by step, create excellence. Get inducted into your own hall of fame.

But remember, the greatest hall of fame is… treating others your best.

 

 


 

 

John Robert Wooden (October 14, 1910 – June 4, 2010) was an American basketball coach. He was a member of the Basketball Hall of Fame as both a player (inducted in 1961) and as a coach (inducted in 1973). He was the first person ever enshrined in both categories. His ten NCAA national championships in a 12-year period while at UCLA are unmatched by any other college basketball coach.  He was married to Nellie Riley for 53 years, and they had two children.  After Nellie’s death, John had a monthly ritual until his own death 25 years later, of visiting her grave and writing her a love letter.