Tag Archives: nature

The Classic Pamela Positive: “The Best Way Out Is Always Through” – Robert Frost

 

“The best way out is always through.”

― Robert Frost

 

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Our dear Poet has practical advice for us…. we must take a step forward. You might be facing a challenge but you must find the way through.

We don’t have to be overwhelmed… we can simply take one step. One step towards progress. One step towards harmony. One step towards resolution!

Thank you Robert Frost for simply encouraging us. You must take a step! And, you will make it through.

 

I’m Taking My Step,

Pamela

 


Robert Frost (1874-1963) was a highly-regarded poet known for his depiction of rural life. He published his first poem in high school. He attended Harvard but did not graduate due to illness; he received an honorary degree from Harvard posthumously, as well as more than 40 other honorary degrees. Though Frost grew up in the city, he lived on farms later in his life. He was a professor at Amherst College, and at Middlebury College for 42 years. Some of his best-known poems include “The Road Not Taken,” “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening,” and “Nothing Gold Can Stay.”

This particular quote is from the poem “A Servant to Servants” (1914). Many of Frost’s poems explore the splendor of the outdoors. However, “A Servant to Servants” is a contrast to the typical Frostian nature poem. Its speaker is the wife of a hard-working farmer who feels trapped in her life that seems meaningless. She explains her monotonous daily routine. The poem is written in iambic pentameter, although it varies in meter with no apparent rhyme scheme. A constant symbol in this poem is nature representing freedom, but it is a freedom that the speaker cannot attain.

Bio Source: Wikipedia


Fig¹.  Photo from Wikimedia

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Better To Make a Few Mistakes Being Natural” – Dr. Benjamin Spock

 

“Better to make a few mistakes being natural than to do everything out of a feeling of worry.”

— Dr. Benjamin Spock

 

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It’s better to make a few mistakes being natural.  It’s important to be who we are in a natural, real way.  If we get everything right, and are absolutely perfect, but it’s done with anxiety…. then it actually isn’t right, is it?

 

What we do needs to be done with care, love, calm.  With joy and sincerity…and since Dr. Benjamin Spock was a famous leader in parenting in the 40s, I’ll take his advice not only for parenting, but also for management.  And for our communications, how we live our lives, how we treat others…

 


Dr. Spock was an influential writer on childrearing, who advocated for increased flexibility and affection in the treatment of infants and children.  He was a pediatrician and his book entitled Baby and Childcare is one of the best selling books in history.  Aside from that work, he also published 12 other books.  He was an activist, involved in the anti-war movements in the 1960s and 1970s.  While at Yale University, he became an Olympic gold medalist in rowing.  He married Jane Cheney and they had two children together.

Bio Source: Wikipedia 


Fig¹.Photo by Steve Halama on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “The Future Will Belong To the Nature-Smart…The More High-Tech We Become, the More Nature We Need.” – Richard Louv

 

“The future will belong to the nature-smart…The more high-tech we become, the more nature we need.”

– Richard Louv

 

 

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We email, text, tweet, and then buy on Amazon.  The Tribune Media Group recently reported we’re on the Web at over 5 hours each day.  In addition to that, we’re involved in technology almost every day.

Do we see Nature every day?

 

 

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Even if the nature immediately around you isn’t as beautiful as above, there is still so much glory. The sun, green grass, fresh air, a cool breeze, rain that refreshes all and cleans the earth.

 

 

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Look up to the sky.

I remember as child, one of my favorite things was playing outdoors in my backyard. I’d be in the sandbox, gazing at the glorious California blue of the sky, and the tall, green trees for which “Palo Alto” was named.  The very tip tops seemed to frame in their own haphazard way, a fringe around the sky.  And seeing that medium dark green up next to a beautiful heaven blue, was  a bit of perfection.  It was peacefulness in my childhood.

So technology does seem to reign at times.   It’s what life has evolved to, and we shouldn’t stop it.  It allows us to stay in touch with people we love, and to get certain things done quicker.  Yet, we can take steps to ensure balance in our lives. Balance for engaging with the natural world just as much as we do with gadgets.

Join me in appreciating whatever nature is in front of you today,

Pamela

 

 


 

 

Richard Louv is a journalist and author of books about the connections amongst family, nature, and community.  He is the founding chairman of the Children & Nature Network, an organization that helps to connect today’s children and future generations to the natural world.  Louv is also Honorary Co-chairman of Canada’s national Children and Nature Alliance; a part of the board of directors of ecoAmerica and the editorial board of Ecopsychology. Previously, he was a columnist for The San Diego Union-Tribune and a columnist and member of the editorial advisory board for Parents magazine.  Louv’s accomplishments include the 2007 Cox Award for “sustained achievement in public service,” the highest honor of Clemson University.   In 2009, he earned the International Making Cities Livable Jane Jacobs Award.

Louv is married to Kathy Frederick Louv and the father of two sons, Jason and Matthew.  Although an author and journalist, Richard Louv has said about himself that “he would rather fish than write.”

Bio source: About Richard Louv

Statistic source: Tribune Media Group

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Belief Is A Wise Wager.”- Blaise Pascal

“Granted that faith cannot be proved, what harm will come to you if you gamble on its truth and it proves false? If you gain, you gain all; if you lose, you lose nothing. Wager, then, without hesitation that He exists.”   

        – Blaise Pascal

 

Believing, about anything that is good, is the positive way forward in life.

 

 

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Believe in love.

 

Believe in nature and its calm healing power!

 

Believe in goodness.

 

Throw your weight into believing in anything good!

 

 

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Investing in Believing,

Pamela

 

 


 

 

Mathematician Blaise Pascal was born on June 19, 1623, in Clermont-Ferrand, France. He was the third of four children and only son to Etienne and Antoinette Pascal. Etienne had decided to educate Blaise—a child prodigy—at home so he could design an unorthodox curriculum and make sure that Blaise was able to express his own innate curiosity. In the 1640s he invented the Pascaline, an early calculator, and further validated Evangelista Torricelli’s theory concerning the cause of barometrical variations. In the 1650s, Pascal laid the foundation of probability theory with Pierre de Fermat and published the theological work “Les Provinciales”, a groundbreaking series of letters that defended his Jansenist faith.

 

Pascal is also widely known for his body of notes posthumously released as the Pensées. He died in Paris on August 19, 1662. He was 39 years old. Pascal’s inventions and discoveries have been instrumental to developments in the fields of geometry, physics and computer science, influencing 17th-century visionaries like Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz and Isaac Newton.

 

Citations:
Fig. 1: Photo by Ben White on Unsplash
Fig. 2: Photo by Rachel Pfuetzner on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Be Clear About What Is Truly Essential”

 

Marine corps officer Robert J. Wicks shares with us some important lessons on life and nature.

Rather than read, he encourages us to reflect.  If we face a challenge, we can act not from anger but from joy and grounded peace.

 

 

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From his book, Streams of Contentment, here are three tips on living a natural, and successful life.

* Be clear about what is truly essential.

* Appreciate everything and everyone in your life right now.

* Recognize that a little silence and solitude is no small thing.

– Robert J. Wicks

When we appreciate what is important, right now, we honor life and everyone around us.

 

 


 

 

 

Robert J. Wicks is a clinical psychologist and author, interested in how spirituality and psychology are intertwined. He graduated from Fairfield University in Connecticut in 1968, with a B.A. in psychology and philosophy. He later went on to receive his PhD in psychology from Hahnemann Medical College and Hospital, now known as Drexel University Medical College. Wicks has taught at a number of universities, given commencement speeches, and presented to Congress. In the 1990s, he worked with relief workers, who were working in Rwanda during the civil war. He has also worked with professionals who support Iraqi and Afghan war veterans in the early 2000s. Throughout his career, he has published over 40 books inspired by his studies into psychology and spirituality. Wicks has received a number of awards including the The Humanitarian Award Association for Spiritual, Ethical, Religious and Value Issues in Counseling American Counseling Association. He has been married to his wife, Michaele Barry Wicks, for over 40 years and they have one daughter together.

 

 

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: Is America’s Banyan Tree the Conference Room?

 

This is Part Two of a Two-Part series on the Bayan tree. You can read Part One here.

 

 

It is interesting how in America and in many places across the world, most of our meetings take place in walled, sterile conference rooms. Chairs are uniformly around the table. The walls are usually plastered with notices about the companys achievements. Pens and pads are available so we can write and record and get our business done.”Gosh darn it,” I can hear the executives say, “in this room we’re going to get to the solution, get down to business, and ‘make it happen.’

 

 

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Yet what if we looked at doing all of our business, or even holding all of our meetings, under a banyan tree? This return to nature might help conversations flow more easily.

 

 

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Perhaps this atmosphere would allow us to be more authentic. If we are surrounded by nature’s occasional stirring winds, visionary clouds floating across the sky, and brilliant beckoning sun, would we not also settle into a more authentic course of conversation?Could it lead to more natural, comfortable (and no less impactful, but rather more so) solutions? Within this reframing context of nature, we can discuss our goals and hopes and plans and perhaps achieve even greater goals.

 

 

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Here’s a thought… We can replace the pen, paper and busy scribbling of notes, with more eye contact. We supplant the flurried white board scrawls with more thoughtful listening. What a profound impact this has to have on any business relationship, business decision, and especially, with any personal matter. 

Until we can “Unconference Room” your meeting space, perhaps we can imagine all of our conversations thoughtfully taking place under a Banyan tree. A place where comfort, understanding, and right relationships result under its strong, rooted and peaceful presence.

 

 


 

 

The banyan tree originally received its name from the merchants who gathered beneath it to do business; in the Gujarati language, banyameans merchant/grocer.” Western visitors to India observed the merchants meeting beneath the tree, and the name evolved to refer to the tree itself. The banyan trees are given great symbolism in both Hinduism and Buddhism. Banyan trees can grow to cover hundreds of feet, and live for over a thousand years.

The Classic Pamela Positive: “UnConference Room” Your Meeting with a Peaceful Banyan Tree

 

This is Part One of a Two-Part series on the Bayan tree.

There are many images that come to mind when we think of Asia, from dragons to beautiful beaches, spanning varied cultures. 

 

 

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One of my favorite views is that of the banyan tree, for it must be strongly grounded in the earth, which also allows its larger branches and leaves to provide overreaching shade.

 

 

banyantree_jeep2499_sstock.jpgPhoto from Shutterstock

 


 
It was under a banyan tree where the Buddha felt his calling to a new level of enlightenment. Under these same trees, Gujarati businessmen hold their meetings. It is even used as a place for political meetings: Recently in Malaysia, the state assembly met underneath the welcome atmosphere of the banyan tree. So for much of Asia, spirituality, entrepreneurship, politics are taking place right outdoors.

 

 

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Photo from Walk of Hope 2015-16

 



The banyan tree represents solidity, rootedness, and strength. At the same time, it also represents comfort, shade and welcome.  It is a source of power, balanced with peace.  It represents firmness, as well as welcome.

 

This is Part One of a Two-Part series on the Bayan tree. Read Part Two tomorrow.