Tag Archives: managing yourself

The Classic Pamela Positive: Be Prepared To Be Kind

 

Be Prepared. That’s the motto of the Girl Scouts and Boy Scouts.

When you think about it, being prepared is not just for wilderness trips. And while being prepared often means having savings, storing water for an earthquake or natural disaster, and keeping a flashlight in your car, it also means being prepared qualitatively. It’s about being prepared to react with positive qualities, in your day to day life.

 

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It’s all about what you hold, store and prepare within yourself.

So be prepared to be kind.

Some days you may not receive pleasant news. Will you react in anger, distrust, sadness, gloom? Or will you respond with patience, a willingness to see all sides and the realization that all things are truly working towards a greater good?

 

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Set yourself to react kindly. That means both to yourself and others. Don’t come down hard on yourself; don’t come down hard on others. Be understanding.

Be prepared to be kind. It’s the ultimate preparation.

 


Girl Scouts: Girl Scouts of the USA is the world’s preeminent organization dedicated solely to girls—all girls—where, in an accepting and nurturing environment, girls build character and skills for success in the real world. In partnership with committed adult volunteers, girls develop qualities that will serve them all their lives, like leadership, strong values, social conscience, and conviction about their own potential and self-worth.

Boy Scouts: The Boy Scouts of America is one of the nation’s largest and most prominent values-based youth development organizations. The BSA provides a program for young people that builds character, trains them in the responsibilities of participating citizenship, and develops personal fitness.

Bio Source: Girl Scouts, Boy Scouts of America  Fig¹. Kevia Tan on Unsplash  Fig². Hian Oliveira on Unsplash  

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Everything You Need Is Already Inside.” – Bill Bowerman

 

Everything you need is already inside. Just do it.

– Bill Bowerman

 

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I love Bill Bowerman’s quote, as he speaks to the potential and belief in each one of us… We should always strive to be our best and to believe in ourselves, even if we don’t always achieve our immediate goal. The importance is in the process and our motives.

We should treat ourselves and others with the utmost care, meaning, “We believe!” The alternative is costly to our health, to what we can achieve, and to what the world will miss…

What I love is that Bill Bowerman translated this belief across many areas — personal values, sports training, and business. Believing isn’t relegated to any sector!

 


Bill Bowerman was a track and field coach for the University of Oregon. Born in Portland, Oregon, Bowerman was raised in Fossil, Oregon by his mother after his parents split. In his childhood, he was part of the school band and the football team. He received his B.A. from the University of Oregon, where he studied journalism and played football. He also served in the military as a Major in the army during World War II. In his 24-year career he trained 31 Olympic athletes, twelve American record holders, 51 All-Americans and 24 NCAA champions. One year he won 4 NCAA titles. In 1964 he became the co-founder of Nike. He and his wife Barbara were high school sweethearts, married for more than 60 years and they had two children together. 

Bio Source: Wikipedia  Fig¹.  Photo by Blake Cheek on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Enjoy When You Can, Endure When You Must”

 

“Enjoy when you can, and endure when you must.” 

— Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

 

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Two grand lessons today: Enjoy and Persevere.

There is so much to enjoy… and so important that we focus on it. It can be easy to be distracted into something that isn’t working when we really should enjoy and relish what is before us. It need not be a big event. It can be a small gratitude.

 

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Then, too, there are times to patiently persevere. Not all is easy, peaceful; at times we must stay the course, step by step, like a diligent marathon runner, committed to her course, unrelenting until the final finish line. It might not be a quick race, but more a matter of a marathon.

So stick with it, stay with it, and maintain your joy. I know it’s hard and I have felt it too.

We’re Committing, 

Pamela

 


Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749-1832) was a German poet, playwright, novelist, and natural philosopher, best known for his two-part poetic drama Faust, which he started around the age of twenty-three and didn’t finish until shortly before his death sixty years later. He is considered one of the greatest contributors to the German Romantic period. At the age of sixteen, in 1765, Goethe went to Leipzig University to study law as his father wished, though he also gained much recognition from the Rococo poems and lyrics he wrote during this period. In 1766 he fell in love with Anne Catharina Schoenkopf (1746-1810) and wrote his joyfully exuberant collection of poems Annette.

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe formally married Christiane Vulpius in October 1806. He was opposed to the church ceremony that was, at the time, the only way of being legally married, so, although she bore Goethe a son, August, in 1789, he didn’t marry her until the Napoleonic army sacked the city in which they lived.

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe now rests in the Fürstengruft or “Royal Tomb” in the “Historic Cemetery” in Weimar where his dear friend Schiller is also laid to rest. In honor of these two famous German men of letters, a statue of Goethe and Schiller now stands at the German National Theatre in Munich. UNESCO’S “Memory of the World” list includes the handwritten works of Goethe preserved by the Goethe-Schiller-Archive.

Bio Source: The Literature Network  Fig¹. nappy on Pexels  Fig². Caleb Jones on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Make Each Day Your Masterpiece.” – John Wooden

 

“Make each day your masterpiece.”

— John Wooden

 

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Unmatched. That’s what Coach John Wooden is asking us to be.

To live a life unmatched each day — which is a masterpiece — means living according to your values.

When I usually think about a gargantuan goal, I think of something more along the lines of an Olympian. Yet it doesn’t always mean running (or winning) a marathon.

It is being your own masterpiece. That means today, you live with kindness in all the minute interactions you might have. It’s not just about doing your best, yet also treating others your best. You, your being and presence, are the kind masterpiece that positively affects the world.

From living your masterpiece as an individual, and on this basis of values — only then can you paint another masterpiece. Pick a passion… be it gardening, being an excellent bookkeeper, being elected to office, writing a short story, exploring the best hikes and appreciating nature… And step by step, create excellence. Get inducted into your own hall of fame.

But remember, the greatest hall of fame is… treating others your best.

 


John Robert Wooden (October 14, 1910 – June 4, 2010) was an American basketball coach. He was a member of the Basketball Hall of Fame as both a player (inducted in 1961) and as a coach (inducted in 1973). He was the first person ever enshrined in both categories. His ten NCAA national championships in a 12-year period while at UCLA are unmatched by any other college basketball coach. He was married to Nellie Riley for 53 years, and they had two children. After Nellie’s death, John had a monthly ritual until his own death 25 years later, of visiting her grave and writing her a love letter.

Bio Source: Wikipedia  Fig¹.  Photo by Daniel Reche on Pexels

 

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Enjoy When You Can, Endure When You Must”

 

“Enjoy when you can, and endure when you must.” 

— Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

 

Two grand lessons today: Enjoy and Persevere.

 

Girl Wearing Blue Denim Dress Shirt

 

There is so much to enjoy… and so important that we focus on it. It can be easy to be distracted into something that isn’t working when we really should enjoy and relish what is before us. It need not be a big event. It can be small gratitude.

 

caleb-jones-131203-unsplash.jpg

 

Then, too, there are times to patiently persevere. Not all is easy, peaceful; at times we must stay the course, step by step, like a diligent marathon runner, committed to her course, unrelenting until the final finish line. It might not be a quick race, but more a matter of a marathon.

 


Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749-1832) was a German poet, playwright, novelist, and natural philosopher, best known for his two-part poetic drama Faust, which he started around the age of twenty-three and didn’t finish until shortly before his death sixty years later. He is considered one of the greatest contributors of the German Romantic period. At the age of sixteen, in 1765, Goethe went to Leipzig University to study law as his father wished, though he also gained much recognition from the Rococo poems and lyrics he wrote during this period. In 1766 he fell in love with Anne Catharina Schoenkopf (1746-1810) and wrote his joyfully exuberant collection of poems Annette.

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe formally married Christiane Vulpius in October 1806. He was opposed to the church ceremony that was, at the time, the only way of being legally married, so, although she bore Goethe a son, August, in 1789, he didn’t marry her until the Napoleonic army sacked the city in which they lived.

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe now rests in the Fürstengruft or “Royal Tomb” in the “Historic Cemetery” in Weimar where his dear friend Schiller is also laid to rest. In honor of these two famous German men of letters, a statue of Goethe and Schiller now stands at the German National Theatre in Munich. UNESCO’S “Memory of the World” list includes the handwritten works of Goethe preserved by the Goethe-Schiller-Archive.

BioSource: The Literature Network  Fig¹. nappy on Pexels  Fig². Caleb Jones on Unsplash