Tag Archives: lessons

The Classic Pamela Positive: “You Do Things When The Opportunities Come Along” – Warren Buffett

 

You do things when the opportunities come along.  I’ve had periods in my life when I’ve had a bundle of ideas come along, and I’ve had long dry spells. If I get an idea next week, I’ll do something. If not, I won’t do a damn thing.”  

― Warren Buffett

 

You’re an entrepreneur. A scientist. A playwright. A second-grade teacher with a curriculum you need to put together. An artist. A music organizer. A guitarist. A preacher. All of them need new ideas, new creativity, every day!

 

 

man writing on white paper

 

 

It’s exciting… and also a lot of pressure.

 

What’s happening when “you don’t have any ideas”?

 

Well, something very important is happening.

 

First, your brain cannot be on creative overdrive every moment. It needs time to recharge and build up “blank” space. It’s like saying you don’t need to sleep. Body, mind, heart and soul all need time for rest… and then you can keep giving your 100% and be charged to excel again!

 

 

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Secondly, patience is key. Just as Warren Buffett says, “if he doesn’t have an idea he doesn’t do anything.”

 

That’s really key. He’s not forcing it. He’s staying patient. He’s believing that the new idea is going to come.

 

And here’s where the real lesson is. He doesn’t make a billion dollar mistake.

 

If you get worried, push something, force an answer- it’s usually not right. So Buffett has done a brilliant but simple thing. He hasn’t made a lot of mistakes because he is not pushing it. He’s trusting the creative process. And therefore, waiting, patiently, for that wisdom. Therefore he makes billions of dollars, rather than lose billions of dollars.

 

 

man standing while looking at the mountain

 

 

Let’s review Buffett’s wisdom again. How does this affect your life? When have you made a rushed mistake? When you have had patience and waited for that peaceful answer? Please comment below!

 


Born in Nebraska in 1930, Warren Buffett demonstrated keen business abilities at a young age. Nebraska was hit hard by the effects of the Great Depression. Like many children of the Depression, Buffett grew up to respect the value of money.

In grade school and high school Buffett not only showed his precocious proclivity for business by delivering newspapers, but also sold stamps, Coca-Cola beverages, golf balls and magazines door-to-door. By the time he was 15, Warren had amassed $2,000 and used it to buy a 40-acre farm in Nebraska. He hired a farm laborer to work on the land, then used the profits to help pay his way through University.

He formed Buffett Partnership Ltd. in 1956, and by 1965 he had assumed control of Berkshire Hathaway. Overseeing the growth of a conglomerate with holdings in the media, insurance, energy and food and beverage industries, Buffett became one of the world’s richest men and a celebrated philanthropist. In June of 2006, Buffett announced his intention to give away most of his fortune to charity.

Buffett believes in family and has 4 children, and lives in the same hometown of Nebraska.

Bio Source: Wikipedia


Citation:

Fig¹.  Photo by LinkedIn Sales Navigator on Unsplash

Fig².  Photo by Jeremy Bishop on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: Thoughts on Kindness and Battle

“Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a great battle.”

 

 

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This quote is often attributed to Philo of Alexandria. Philo was a Hellenistic Jewish philosopher who lived from 20 BC to 50 AD. This quote is also sometimes cited to Plato, a classical Greek philosopher who was the student of Socrates and the teacher of Aristotle.

 

I received this great quote from a wonderful academic leader at USC, Warren Bennis. I was sharing my mission and values with Dr. Bennis, and he provided this quote as helpful guidance.

 

I met Dr. Bennis when I was inducted into his leadership institute while getting my masters in communications. His demeanor is warm, kind, astute and constantly open to new trends and progress in our society. Dr. Bennis, thank you for this meaningful quote!

 

 

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: What Dogs Teach Us

 

Here is a moving story I wanted to share. The author is unknown.

This involves a story of a young boy whose dog needed to be put to sleep. Here is a conversation that ensued with his family.

 

 

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“We sat together for a while after Belker’s (the dog’s) death, wondering aloud about the sad fact that animal lives are shorter than human lives. Shane, who had been listening quietly, piped up “I know why.”

 

 

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Startled, we all turned to him. What came out of his mouth next stunned me. I’d never heard a more comforting explanation. It has changed the way I try to live. He said, “People are born so that they can learn how to live a good life—like loving everybody all the time and being nice, right?”

The six-year-old continued, “Well, dogs already know how to do that, so they don’t have to stay as long.”

 

 

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Remember, if a dog was the teacher you would learn things like:

  • When loved ones come home, always run to greet them;
  • Never pass up the opportunity to go for a joyride;
  • Take naps;
  • Allow the experience of fresh air and the wind in your face to be pure ecstasy;
  • Stretch before rising;
  • Run, romp, and play daily;
  • Thrive on attention and let people touch you;
  • Avoid biting when a simple growl will do;
  • On warm days, stop to lie on your back on the grass;
  • On hot days, drink lots of water and lie under a shady tree;
  • When you’re happy, dance around and wag your entire body;
  • Delight in the simple joy of a long walk;
  • Be loyal;
  • Never pretend to be something you’re not;
  • If what you want lies buried, dig until you find it;
  • When someone is having a bad day, be silent, sit close by and nuzzle them gently.

 

 

 

 The Classic Pamela Positive: In Order to Love, You Must First Learn

“The greatest of human emotions is love. The most valuable of human gifts is the ability to learn. Therefore learn to love.”

 

 – UJ Ramdas

 

 

Oh! Dear Leaders today… may we embrace this lovely admonition. Our life is a beautiful life, at home at work, in the depths of despair, in the positive celebrations. We must continue to learn, and continue to love.

 

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I will share this story with you. Early on in my work life, I was running my second company around age 31? 32? And my heart was all in it. It was my calling; it was UniversalGiving. And had worked very hard to get it off the ground.

 

We were building the team, and it was a young team. Like me… so some were only a few years younger than me, or my age! What to do.

 

Kindness was key for me. That’s what I grew up with in my home, and I didn’t know any differently. But now, there were points of difference. People wanted things done a certain way, weren’t gracious in their conversation, or they didn’t want to work as much, but we we’re still in startup mode and needed that extra effort in the beginning (in the long-run though, I highly believe in balance!) And I cowtowed.

 

Because kindness ruled my day, I let that lead everything.

 

I let them do most everything they wanted, to maintain harmony.

 

But there wasn’t.

 

And I got walked on. And tremendously hurt.

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And they spoke down to me. And I let it happen.

 

 

There were no boundaries.

 

 

And they lost respect for me.

 

And they left.

 

And I really, really hurt.

 

I was staying with my values of kindness, yet, it was a permissiveness that was not actually loving. Love can be strong, and kind, and with boundaries. So I had to learn.

 

This is why I highly agree with UJ Ramdas. We must love– but we must learn. I learned to love in higher, different way– one based on kindness, firmness and adherance to my values. And with that, my respect for myself — and others’ respect for me — returned. And I could rebuild the team.

 

If you have a challenge today, seek out what you need to learn, and how you need to love. That’s how we can be our best leadership self. Don’t wait — we start today.  (:

 


 

UJ Ramdas brings together his passion for psychology and business to create a better world. Along with Alex Ikon, he co-created the “Five Minute Journal” with the goal to enable people to be happier in five minutes a day. With a background in behavioral science, marketing, and hypnosis he consults with hundreds of clients to bring them out of confusion into clarity. Currently based in Toronto, Canada, he is a huge fan of wilderness, eastern meditative practices, and a good cup of tea. You can visit his website by clicking here.

The Classic Pamela Positive: “You Do Things When The Opportunities Come Along” – Warren Buffett

You do things when the opportunities come along.  I’ve had periods in my life when I’ve had a bundle of ideas come along, and I’ve had long dry spells. If I get an idea next week, I’ll do something. If not, I won’t do a damn thing.”  

– Warren Buffett

 

You’re an entrepreneur. A scientist. A playwright. A second-grade teacher with a curriculum you need to put together. An artist. A music organizer. A guitarist. A preacher. All of them need new ideas, new creativity, every day!

 

 

 

 

It’s exciting… and also a lot of pressure.

 

What’s happening when “you don’t have any ideas”?

 

Well, something very important is happening.

 

First, your brain cannot be on creative overdrive every moment. It needs time to recharge and build up “blank” space. It’s like saying you don’t need to sleep. Body, mind, heart and soul all need time for rest… and then you can keep giving your 100% and be charged to excel again!

 

 

stones-944145_1280.jpg

 

 

Secondly, patience is key. Just as Warren Buffett says, “if he doesn’t have an idea he doesn’t do anything.”

 

That’s really key. He’s not forcing it. He’s staying patient. He’s believing that the new idea is going to come.

 

And here’s where the real lesson is. He doesn’t make a billion dollar mistake.

 

If you get worried, push something, force an answer– it’s usually not right. So Buffett has done a brilliant but simple thing. He hasn’t made a lot of mistakes because he is not pushing it. He’s trusting the creative process. And therefore, waiting, patiently, for that wisdom. Therefore he makes billions of dollars, rather than lose billions of dollars.

 

 

arnel-hasanovic-640121-unsplash.jpg

 

 

Let’s review Buffett’s wisdom again. How does this affect your life? When have you made a rushed mistake? When you have had patience

and waited for that peaceful answer? Please comment below!

“You do things when the opportunities come along. I’ve had periods in my life when I’ve had a bundle of ideas come along, and I’ve had long dry spells. If I get an idea next week, I’ll do something. If not, I won’t do a damn thing.” 

– Warren Buffett

 


 

Born in Nebraska in 1930, Warren Buffett demonstrated keen business abilities at a young age. Nebraska was hit hard by the effects of the Great Depression. Like many children of the Depression, Buffett grew up to respect the value of money.

In grade school and high school Buffett not only showed his precocious proclivity for business by delivering newspapers, but also sold stamps, Coca-Cola beverages, golf balls and magazines door-to-door. By the time he was 15, Warren had amassed $2,000 and used it to buy a 40-acre farm in Nebraska. He hired a farm laborer to work on the land, then used the profits to help pay his way through University.

He formed Buffett Partnership Ltd. in 1956, and by 1965 he had assumed control of Berkshire Hathaway. Overseeing the growth of a conglomerate with holdings in the media, insurance, energy and food and beverage industries, Buffett became one of the world’s richest men and a celebrated philanthropist. In June of 2006, Buffett announced his intention to give away most of his fortune to charity.

Buffett believes in family and has 4 children, and lives in the same hometown of Nebraska.

The Professionalization of Charities: What Nonprofits and For-Profits Can Learn From Each Other

 

We’re excited to announce our Founder  and CEO Pamela Hawley was just featured in Forbes publication! The article is entitled The Professionalization of Charities: What Nonprofits and For-Profits Can Learn From Each Other, and was published on January 11, 2018. Please see below!

 

 

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As stated in an article by The Economist (subscription required), “Nonprofit organizations are learning lessons from businesses. And businesses are learning from charities”

I love that people are seeing that the for-profit sector and nonprofit sector can learn from each other. Nonprofits are reassembling more and more like businesses. They might have storefronts, generate revenue, maintain contracts and create strong brands.

“That shift is global,” according to Lester Salamon of Johns Hopkins Centre for Civil Society Studies.

 

 

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Based on my experience in the nonprofit industry, here are five areas in which I believe nonprofits can learn from for-profits:

1. Efficiency: Nonprofits can be more efficient by watching how for-profits measure results. They, too, can think about their services in terms of having clearer, more tangible results.

 

 

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2. A Strong Board Of Directors: Public for-profits create strong boards of directors. They know that having a board of directors can provide them with introductions and strong funding and can help to push the organization to another level. Nonprofits should follow this aim.

 

3. Generating Revenue: For-profits need to generate revenue to survive. I would say that the same should hold true for nonprofits. Try to have that standard.

 

 

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4. Employee Benefits: For-profits often provide more employee benefits. Nonprofits should do the same. They can be different types of benefits, such as letting your employees leave at 5 p.m., and providing more balance as well as more vacation time. These are important benefits that don’t have to cost too much and encourage increased morale and team spirit.

Next, let’s review the ways for-profits can learn from nonprofits:

1. Mission-Oriented

Based on my perspective, for-profits have a tendency to get caught up with results and sometimes lose their sense of purpose in why they’re doing what they’re doing. Public companies may feel focused on the stock market, for instance. For some for-profits, it may help to refocus on the mission to keep the soul of the company alive.

2. Positive Culture

There are many for-profits out there that drive relentlessly on results and forget about the people working at their organization. While they may provide bins of yogurt pretzels, cereal, candy, free dinners, pet grooming, laundry facilities and the like, there’s nothing that replaces good old appreciation and kindness in the day-to-day office life. At the end of the day, environment counts for a lot more than some for-profits might realize.

 

 

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As the Harvard Business Review states, “While a cut-throat environment and a culture of fear can ensure engagement (and sometimes even excitement) for some time, research suggests that the inevitable stress it creates will likely lead to disengagement over the long term.” Based on my perspective, that’s because they aren’t conscious, caring and owning their relationship with the company. They are halfway out the door or already checked out.

Additionally, “The State of the American Workplace” report by Gallup, which measures employee engagement, found that “work units in the top quartile in employee engagement outperformed bottom-quartile units by 10% on customer ratings, 22% in profitability and 21% in productivity.” High engagement also resulted in less absenteeism and turnover.

Not caring is not good for business. Some for-profits can benefit from changing their approach to increase their team’s engagement.

 

 

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3. ‘Doer Organizations’

Nonprofits don’t have the time to strategize, sit back in their chairs and analyze from above. They have to be both strategic and tactical. They have to care about both the long-term strategy and the day-to-day execution. Most nonprofits don’t have a lot of resources, so pretty much everyone on the staff is a “doer.”

Yet, for-profit companies often have a lot of fat. That middle layer at companies may be wasting company time, but the company has gotten too big to manage everyone effectively and resourcefully. Most nonprofits simply don’t have money to waste on this.

Your people should be there because of their heart and commitment. They are there to achieve a mission and change the world. Having team filled with doers can create strong, long-term cultures that can positively impact both nonprofits and for-profits.

 

 

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I believe both sectors should converge to learn from each other. Both have healthy aspects that need to be practiced. As a nonprofit, be proud of what you have to offer for-profits. And make sure you take the lessons learned from for-profits so that you can create a top-running organization.

The Professionalization of Charities: What Nonprofits and For-Profits Can Learn From Each Other, Part Two

 

We’re excited to announce our Founder  and CEO Pamela Hawley was just featured in Forbes publication! The article is entitled The Professionalization of Charities: What Nonprofits and For-Profits Can Learn From Each Other, and was published on January 11, 2018. Thank you for reading part one of her article and please see below for part two of her article.

 

 

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Next, let’s review the ways for-profits can learn from nonprofits:

1. Mission-Oriented

Based on my perspective, for-profits have a tendency to get caught up with results and sometimes lose their sense of purpose in why they’re doing what they’re doing. Public companies may feel focused on the stock market, for instance. For some for-profits, it may help to refocus on the mission to keep the soul of the company alive.

2. Positive Culture

There are many for-profits out there that drive relentlessly on results and forget about the people working at their organization. While they may provide bins of yogurt pretzels, cereal, candy, free dinners, pet grooming, laundry facilities and the like, there’s nothing that replaces good old appreciation and kindness in the day-to-day office life. At the end of the day, environment counts for a lot more than some for-profits might realize.

 

 

lycs-lycs-744230-unsplash.jpg

 

 

As the Harvard Business Review states, “While a cut-throat environment and a culture of fear can ensure engagement (and sometimes even excitement) for some time, research suggests that the inevitable stress it creates will likely lead to disengagement over the long term.” Based on my perspective, that’s because they aren’t conscious, caring and owning their relationship with the company. They are halfway out the door or already checked out.

Additionally, “The State of the American Workplace” report by Gallup, which measures employee engagement, found that “work units in the top quartile in employee engagement outperformed bottom-quartile units by 10% on customer ratings, 22% in profitability and 21% in productivity.” High engagement also resulted in less absenteeism and turnover.

Not caring is not good for business. Some for-profits can benefit from changing their approach to increase their team’s engagement.

 

 

rawpixel-788601-unsplash.jpg

 

 

3. ‘Doer Organizations’

Nonprofits don’t have the time to strategize, sit back in their chairs and analyze from above. They have to be both strategic and tactical. They have to care about both the long-term strategy and the day-to-day execution. Most nonprofits don’t have a lot of resources, so pretty much everyone on the staff is a “doer.”

Yet, for-profit companies often have a lot of fat. That middle layer at companies may be wasting company time, but the company has gotten too big to manage everyone effectively and resourcefully. Most nonprofits simply don’t have money to waste on this.

Your people should be there because of their heart and commitment. They are there to achieve a mission and change the world. Having team filled with doers can create strong, long-term cultures that can positively impact both nonprofits and for-profits.

 

 

rawpixel-651327-unsplash.jpg

 

 

I believe both sectors should converge to learn from each other. Both have healthy aspects that need to be practiced. As a nonprofit, be proud of what you have to offer for-profits. And make sure you take the lessons learned from for-profits so that you can create a top-running organization.