Tag Archives: learning

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Death Is Nothing At All” -Henry Scott Holland

 

 

My beloved Oma was one of my best friends. And yet she is with me constantly. It’s not easy, it never will be, but it changes. I am learning to become more natural in my connection with her, even though I can’t see her. I can still feel her presence, I can still feel her love.

 

I spoke this from memory at her service, and I still love it to this day. Oma, I know you are “just around the corner.” I love you, Oma.

 

 

khadeeja-yasser-485476-unsplash.jpg

 

 

Death is nothing at all.

I have only slipped away to the next room.

I am I and you are you.

Whatever we were to each other,

That, we still are.

Call me by my old familiar name.

Speak to me in the easy way which you always used.

Put no difference into your tone.

Wear no forced air of solemnity or sorrow.

Laugh as we always laughed

at the little jokes we enjoyed together.

Play, smile, think of me. Pray for me.

Let my name be ever the household word

that it always was.

Let it be spoken without effect.

Without the trace of a shadow on it.

Life means all that it ever meant.

It is the same that it ever was.

There is absolute unbroken continuity.

Why should I be out of mind

because I am out of sight?

I am but waiting for you.

For an interval.

Somewhere. Very near.

Just around the corner.

All is well.

—Henry Scott Holland

 

 


Henry Scott Holland was Regius Professor of Divinity at the University of Oxford. He was also a canon of Christ Church, Oxford.

Henry was born at Ledbury, Herefordshire the son of George Henry Holland of Dumbleton Hall, Evesham, and of the Hon. Charlotte Dorothy Gifford, the daughter of Lord Gifford. He finished his studies in Balliol College in Oxford, England where he had the Oxford degrees of DD, MA, and Honorary DLitt. He was elected as a Student (fellow) of Christ Church, Oxford after graduation and later went to St Paul’s Cathedral where he was appointed canon in 1884.

He was keenly interested in social justice and formed PESEK (Politics, Economics, Socialism, Ethics and Christianity) and tried to heal urban poverty. In 1889, he formed the Christian Social Union. In 1910, he was appointed Regius Professor of Divinity at Oxford University, a post he held until his death in 1918. While at St Paul’s Cathedral, Holland delivered a sermon in May 1910 following the death of King Edward VII, titled Death the King of Terrors, in which he explores the natural but seemingly contradictory responses to death: the fear of the unexplained and the belief in continuity. It is from his discussion of the latter that perhaps his best-known writing, Death is nothing at all, is drawn:

“Death is nothing at all. It does not count. I have only slipped away into the next room. Nothing has happened. Everything remains exactly as it was. I am I, and you are you, and the old life that we lived so fondly together is untouched, unchanged. Whatever we were to each other, that we are still. Call me by the old familiar name. Speak of me in the easy way which you always used. Put no difference into your tone. Wear no forced air of solemnity or sorrow. Laugh as we always laughed at the little jokes that we enjoyed together. Play, smile, think of me, pray for me. Let my name be ever the household word that it always was. Let it be spoken without an effort, without the ghost of a shadow upon it. Life means all that it ever meant. It is the same as it ever was. There is absolute and unbroken continuity. What is this death but a negligible accident? Why should I be out of mind because I am out of sight? I am but waiting for you, for an interval, somewhere very near, just around the corner. All is well. Nothing is hurt; nothing is lost. One brief moment and all will be as it was before. How we shall laugh at the trouble of parting when we meet again!”

The affinity of Holland’s passage to St. Augustine’s thoughts in his 4th Century letter 263 to Sapida is clear.  In it St. Augustin writes that Sapida’s brother and their love, although he has died, still are there, like gold that still is yours even if you save it in some locker.

Bio source: Wikipedia


Citation:

Fig¹.Khadeeja Yasser on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “When You Learn Something From People…it is a Gift” – Yo-Yo Ma

 

 

“When you learn something from people or from a culture, you accept it as a gift, and it is your lifelong commitment to preserve that gift and to build on that gift.”

— Yo-Yo Ma

 

 

Making Music across Borders: Yo-Yo Ma

 

 

Yo-Yo Ma is a world renowned cellist.  He could be so high and proud. Yet he is humble and learning. That is so he can be the best musician and person.

 

Appreciate the gifts people offer you…and thank them by passing on their gift to others, whether through appreciation, gratitude, love, recognition, sincerity.  Life and music are about giving.

 

We thank Yo-Yo Ma for his contribution to music and the world.

 

And I am thanking you for your personal gift to the world, whatever that might be!

 

Lovingly,

Pamela

 


Yo-Yo Ma is one of the world’s most famous cellists. He has recorded more than 90 albums and received 19 Grammy Awards.

Ma was born in Paris, though the family moved to New York when he was five. He comes from a musical family. His mother was a singer and his father was a violinist; his older sister is also a violinist. A child prodigy, Ma began playing the cello at age four, and performed for John F. Kennedy and Dwight Eisenhower at the age of seven. He attended Julliard at age nine, and went on to study at Harvard. He has performed with orchestras around the world, and has put out 75 albums.

Ma currently plays with the Silk Road Ensemble; their goal is to bring together musicians from the countries which are historically linked by the Silk Road, an ancient trade route linking southeast Asia through the Middle East to northern Africa and the Mediterranean coast of Europe.

Biosource: Wikipedia


Citations:

Yo-Yo Ma Official Website https://www.yo-yoma.com/

Fig¹. World Economic Forum on flickr

The Classic Pamela Positive: Why You Should Sit By An Older Man

 

Now that might sound funny, but the other day I felt called to sit by an older man.

We were at a community gathering, celebrating an organist for all her church music. 

She had performed beautifully over many years and she was a lovely person. We had contributed goodies and a potluck, and a celebratory cake. People were laughing, chatting and sharing memories. It was a wonderful sense of togetherness, that we often miss in our social media society.

 

 

huy-phan-100866-unsplash (1).jpg

 

 

But on the couch was an older man. He didn’t look down, he didn’t look up, he was just sitting there. I asked a friend who he was.

 

“He’s the father of one of our members here, and he’s blind.”

 

I thought what that must feel like.

He’s in a sea of people and conversation….and no one’s talking to him…..

yet he hears everything.

It must be a big loud jumble… but nothing specifically directed towards him…… My heart went out to him.

 

 

rhand-mccoy-621732-unsplash (1).jpg

 

 

I went right away over to the couch and sat down with him. I held his hand and said,

 

“I’m Pamela! Who are you? Are you having a nice day?”

 

His eyes perked up and he continued to look ahead. His face crinkled with a smile. He proceeded to tell me, with very joyous terms, about who he was, his life, and fascinating stories of history. He remembered the time when the Korean War was mentioned in school as well as when World War II was being announced. What prolific, historical events to be a youngster and to hear this global and national news. So monumental, so devastating.

 

 

toa-heftiba-703628-unsplash (1) (1).jpg

 

 

He had many fascinating stories to tell about his childhood, about the importance of his aunt, his mom’s sister, and how devoted she was to church and community.

I listened, listened, listened.

We had such a joyous time.

Having our quiet time of sharing, amidst a joyous gathering.

In our lives, that’s all that really needs to be done is to listen, listen, listen, listen with love, listen with your heart.

Everyone has a story. Everyone has a story to tell. And so we listen.

 

 

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What yours? If you want your story to be heard, if you want to be known… then take some time to listen. Take time to listen to someone else’s story. You will learn; they will love you for it. You both will be enriched and, in this case, a blind man’s eyes opened my blind eyes.

I want to hear your story,

Pamela

 

 


Citations:
Fig. 1: Photo by Huy Phan on Unsplash
Fig. 2: Photo by Rhand Mccoy on Unsplash
Fig. 3: Photo by Toa Heftiba on Unsplash
Fig. 4: Photo by Alex Holyoake on Unsplash
Fig. 5: Photo by Mimi Thian on Unsplash

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Death Is Nothing At All”

 

 

My beloved Oma was one of my best friends. And yet she is with me constantly. It’s not easy, it never will be, but it changes. I am learning to become more natural in my connection with her, even though I can’t see her. I can still feel her presence, I can still feel her love.

 

I spoke this from memory at her service, and I still love it to this day. Oma, I know you are “just around the corner.” I love you, Oma.

 

 

khadeeja-yasser-485476-unsplash.jpg

 

 

Death Is Nothing At All

by Henry Scott Holland

Death is nothing at all.

I have only slipped away to the next room.

I am I and you are you.

Whatever we were to each other,

That, we still are.

Call me by my old familiar name.

Speak to me in the easy way

which you always used.

Put no difference into your tone.

Wear no forced air of solemnity or sorrow.

Laugh as we always laughed

at the little jokes we enjoyed together.

Play, smile, think of me. Pray for me.

Let my name be ever the household word

that it always was.

Let it be spoken without effect.

Without the trace of a shadow on it.

Life means all that it ever meant.

It is the same that it ever was.

There is absolute unbroken continuity.

Why should I be out of mind

because I am out of sight?

I am but waiting for you.

For an interval.

Somewhere. Very near.

Just around the corner.

All is well.

 

 


Henry Scott Holland was Regius Professor of Divinity at the University of Oxford. He was also a canon of Christ Church, Oxford.

Henry was born at Ledbury, Herefordshire the son of George Henry Holland of Dumbleton Hall, Evesham, and of the Hon. Charlotte Dorothy Gifford, the daughter of Lord Gifford. He finished his studies in Balliol College in Oxford, England where he had the Oxford degrees of DD, MA, and Honorary DLitt. He was elected as a Student (fellow) of Christ Church, Oxford after graduation and later went to St Paul’s Cathedral where he was appointed canon in 1884.

He was keenly interested in social justice and formed PESEK (Politics, Economics, Socialism, Ethics and Christianity) and tried to heal urban poverty. In 1889, he formed the Christian Social Union. In 1910, he was appointed Regius Professor of Divinity at Oxford University, a post he held until his death in 1918. While at St Paul’s Cathedral, Holland delivered a sermon in May 1910 following the death of King Edward VII, titled Death the King of Terrors, in which he explores the natural but seemingly contradictory responses to death: the fear of the unexplained and the belief in continuity. It is from his discussion of the latter that perhaps his best-known writing, Death is nothing at all, is drawn:

“Death is nothing at all. It does not count. I have only slipped away into the next room. Nothing has happened. Everything remains exactly as it was. I am I, and you are you, and the old life that we lived so fondly together is untouched, unchanged. Whatever we were to each other, that we are still. Call me by the old familiar name. Speak of me in the easy way which you always used. Put no difference into your tone. Wear no forced air of solemnity or sorrow. Laugh as we always laughed at the little jokes that we enjoyed together. Play, smile, think of me, pray for me. Let my name be ever the household word that it always was. Let it be spoken without an effort, without the ghost of a shadow upon it. Life means all that it ever meant. It is the same as it ever was. There is absolute and unbroken continuity. What is this death but a negligible accident? Why should I be out of mind because I am out of sight? I am but waiting for you, for an interval, somewhere very near, just around the corner. All is well. Nothing is hurt; nothing is lost. One brief moment and all will be as it was before. How we shall laugh at the trouble of parting when we meet again!”

The affinity of Holland’s passage to St. Augustine’s thoughts in his 4th Century letter 263 to Sapida is clear.  In it St. Augustin writes that Sapida’s brother and their love, although he has died, still are there, like gold that still is yours even if you save it in some locker.

Bio source: Wikipedia


Citation:

Fig¹.Khadeeja Yasser on Unsplash

The Professionalization of Charities: What Nonprofits and For-Profits Can Learn From Each Other

 

We’re excited to announce our Founder  and CEO Pamela Hawley was just featured in Forbes publication! The article is entitled The Professionalization of Charities: What Nonprofits and For-Profits Can Learn From Each Other, and was published on January 11, 2018. Please see below!

 

 

250x250 C_3x.png

 

 


 

As stated in an article by The Economist (subscription required), “Nonprofit organizations are learning lessons from businesses. And businesses are learning from charities”

I love that people are seeing that the for-profit sector and nonprofit sector can learn from each other. Nonprofits are reassembling more and more like businesses. They might have storefronts, generate revenue, maintain contracts and create strong brands.

“That shift is global,” according to Lester Salamon of Johns Hopkins Centre for Civil Society Studies.

 

 

rawpixel-558596-unsplash.jpg

 

 

Based on my experience in the nonprofit industry, here are five areas in which I believe nonprofits can learn from for-profits:

1. Efficiency: Nonprofits can be more efficient by watching how for-profits measure results. They, too, can think about their services in terms of having clearer, more tangible results.

 

 

rawpixel-983726-unsplash (1).jpg

 

 

2. A Strong Board Of Directors: Public for-profits create strong boards of directors. They know that having a board of directors can provide them with introductions and strong funding and can help to push the organization to another level. Nonprofits should follow this aim.

 

3. Generating Revenue: For-profits need to generate revenue to survive. I would say that the same should hold true for nonprofits. Try to have that standard.

 

 

rawpixel-602154-unsplash.jpg

 

 

4. Employee Benefits: For-profits often provide more employee benefits. Nonprofits should do the same. They can be different types of benefits, such as letting your employees leave at 5 p.m., and providing more balance as well as more vacation time. These are important benefits that don’t have to cost too much and encourage increased morale and team spirit.

Next, let’s review the ways for-profits can learn from nonprofits:

1. Mission-Oriented

Based on my perspective, for-profits have a tendency to get caught up with results and sometimes lose their sense of purpose in why they’re doing what they’re doing. Public companies may feel focused on the stock market, for instance. For some for-profits, it may help to refocus on the mission to keep the soul of the company alive.

2. Positive Culture

There are many for-profits out there that drive relentlessly on results and forget about the people working at their organization. While they may provide bins of yogurt pretzels, cereal, candy, free dinners, pet grooming, laundry facilities and the like, there’s nothing that replaces good old appreciation and kindness in the day-to-day office life. At the end of the day, environment counts for a lot more than some for-profits might realize.

 

 

lycs-lycs-744230-unsplash.jpg

 

 

As the Harvard Business Review states, “While a cut-throat environment and a culture of fear can ensure engagement (and sometimes even excitement) for some time, research suggests that the inevitable stress it creates will likely lead to disengagement over the long term.” Based on my perspective, that’s because they aren’t conscious, caring and owning their relationship with the company. They are halfway out the door or already checked out.

Additionally, “The State of the American Workplace” report by Gallup, which measures employee engagement, found that “work units in the top quartile in employee engagement outperformed bottom-quartile units by 10% on customer ratings, 22% in profitability and 21% in productivity.” High engagement also resulted in less absenteeism and turnover.

Not caring is not good for business. Some for-profits can benefit from changing their approach to increase their team’s engagement.

 

 

rawpixel-788601-unsplash.jpg

 

 

3. ‘Doer Organizations’

Nonprofits don’t have the time to strategize, sit back in their chairs and analyze from above. They have to be both strategic and tactical. They have to care about both the long-term strategy and the day-to-day execution. Most nonprofits don’t have a lot of resources, so pretty much everyone on the staff is a “doer.”

Yet, for-profit companies often have a lot of fat. That middle layer at companies may be wasting company time, but the company has gotten too big to manage everyone effectively and resourcefully. Most nonprofits simply don’t have money to waste on this.

Your people should be there because of their heart and commitment. They are there to achieve a mission and change the world. Having team filled with doers can create strong, long-term cultures that can positively impact both nonprofits and for-profits.

 

 

rawpixel-651327-unsplash.jpg

 

 

I believe both sectors should converge to learn from each other. Both have healthy aspects that need to be practiced. As a nonprofit, be proud of what you have to offer for-profits. And make sure you take the lessons learned from for-profits so that you can create a top-running organization.

The Professionalization of Charities: What Nonprofits and For-Profits Can Learn From Each Other, Part Two

 

We’re excited to announce our Founder  and CEO Pamela Hawley was just featured in Forbes publication! The article is entitled The Professionalization of Charities: What Nonprofits and For-Profits Can Learn From Each Other, and was published on January 11, 2018. Thank you for reading part one of her article and please see below for part two of her article.

 

 

250x250 C_3x.png

 

 


 

Next, let’s review the ways for-profits can learn from nonprofits:

1. Mission-Oriented

Based on my perspective, for-profits have a tendency to get caught up with results and sometimes lose their sense of purpose in why they’re doing what they’re doing. Public companies may feel focused on the stock market, for instance. For some for-profits, it may help to refocus on the mission to keep the soul of the company alive.

2. Positive Culture

There are many for-profits out there that drive relentlessly on results and forget about the people working at their organization. While they may provide bins of yogurt pretzels, cereal, candy, free dinners, pet grooming, laundry facilities and the like, there’s nothing that replaces good old appreciation and kindness in the day-to-day office life. At the end of the day, environment counts for a lot more than some for-profits might realize.

 

 

lycs-lycs-744230-unsplash.jpg

 

 

As the Harvard Business Review states, “While a cut-throat environment and a culture of fear can ensure engagement (and sometimes even excitement) for some time, research suggests that the inevitable stress it creates will likely lead to disengagement over the long term.” Based on my perspective, that’s because they aren’t conscious, caring and owning their relationship with the company. They are halfway out the door or already checked out.

Additionally, “The State of the American Workplace” report by Gallup, which measures employee engagement, found that “work units in the top quartile in employee engagement outperformed bottom-quartile units by 10% on customer ratings, 22% in profitability and 21% in productivity.” High engagement also resulted in less absenteeism and turnover.

Not caring is not good for business. Some for-profits can benefit from changing their approach to increase their team’s engagement.

 

 

rawpixel-788601-unsplash.jpg

 

 

3. ‘Doer Organizations’

Nonprofits don’t have the time to strategize, sit back in their chairs and analyze from above. They have to be both strategic and tactical. They have to care about both the long-term strategy and the day-to-day execution. Most nonprofits don’t have a lot of resources, so pretty much everyone on the staff is a “doer.”

Yet, for-profit companies often have a lot of fat. That middle layer at companies may be wasting company time, but the company has gotten too big to manage everyone effectively and resourcefully. Most nonprofits simply don’t have money to waste on this.

Your people should be there because of their heart and commitment. They are there to achieve a mission and change the world. Having team filled with doers can create strong, long-term cultures that can positively impact both nonprofits and for-profits.

 

 

rawpixel-651327-unsplash.jpg

 

 

I believe both sectors should converge to learn from each other. Both have healthy aspects that need to be practiced. As a nonprofit, be proud of what you have to offer for-profits. And make sure you take the lessons learned from for-profits so that you can create a top-running organization.

The Professionalization of Charities: What Nonprofits and For-Profits Can Learn From Each Other, Part One

 

We’re excited to announce our Founder  and CEO Pamela Hawley was just featured in Forbes publication! The article is entitled The Professionalization of Charities: What Nonprofits and For-Profits Can Learn From Each Other, and was published on January 11, 2018. Please see below!

 

 

250x250 C_3x.png

 

 


 

As stated in an article by The Economist (subscription required), “Nonprofit organizations are learning lessons from businesses. And businesses are learning from charities”

I love that people are seeing that the for-profit sector and nonprofit sector can learn from each other. Nonprofits are reassembling more and more like businesses. They might have storefronts, generate revenue, maintain contracts and create strong brands.

“That shift is global,” according to Lester Salamon of Johns Hopkins Centre for Civil Society Studies.

 

 

rawpixel-558596-unsplash.jpg

 

 

Based on my experience in the nonprofit industry, here are five areas in which I believe nonprofits can learn from for-profits:

1. Efficiency: Nonprofits can be more efficient by watching how for-profits measure results. They, too, can think about their services in terms of having clearer, more tangible results.

 

 

rawpixel-983726-unsplash (1).jpg

 

 

2. A Strong Board Of Directors: Public for-profits create strong boards of directors. They know that having a board of directors can provide them with introductions and strong funding and can help to push the organization to another level. Nonprofits should follow this aim.

3. Generating Revenue: For-profits need to generate revenue to survive. I would say that the same should hold true for nonprofits. Try to have that standard.

 

 

rawpixel-602154-unsplash.jpg

 

 

4. Employee Benefits: For-profits often provide more employee benefits. Nonprofits should do the same. They can be different types of benefits, such as letting your employees leave at 5 p.m., and providing more balance as well as more vacation time. These are important benefits that don’t have to cost too much and encourage increased morale and team spirit.