Tag Archives: Leadership

The Classic Pamela Positive: Deal with the Complete Person – Zig Ziglar

 

Man is tridimensional (physical, mental, and spiritual). I deal with the complete person. This is the only way to have complete success.”

-Zig Ziglar

 

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We can’t just deal with people from one viewpoint. We all have such important, varied qualities about us. And that’s changing moment by moment… and needs to be honored moment by moment. Who the person is holistically, when honored, brings the greatest benefit to your relationship, your environment, your work, your home.

 

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In addition, Zig was known as one of the most positive, joyful people. He wanted to celebrate people; celebrate them for who they are. And so he also celebrated life for who he is: A positive family man; a father and grandfather; a leader; a kind person; a doer of good; a prolific speaker; an engaging writer; and an encourager of others. That’s the holistic Zig Ziglar.

 


Hilary Hinton “Zig” Ziglar was a motivational speaker, emphasizing Christian values and achieving success in all areas of life. He was born in Alabama in 1926, to a large family and he was the tenth of twelve children. His family lived there for a few years before moving to Mississippi. Zig dealt with tragedy early in his childhood– losing his father and little sister within the same week. He moved to South Carolina to take part in the Navy Training program at the University of South Carolina. Later, he would join forces to create a company that aimed to change America’s view of salesperson through seminars. This would begin his long and successful time as a speaker that traveled around the country.

He was the author of nine books, including See You at the Top and Raising Positive Kids in a Negative World. In 2001, Ziglar was awarded the Cavett Award by The National Speakers Association for bringing honor to the profession and showing commitment to mentoring other members. He passed away November 2012, after his 40-year speaking career brought him to consult for Fortune 500 companies and leaders around the world. He was married to Jean Ziglar and they had four children and seven grandchildren.

Bio Source: Wikipedia


Fig¹.  Photo by DBN-USA Dennis Vosper on flickr
Fig². Photo by Pixabay on Pexels

The Classic Pamela Positive: Faith is a Living, Daring Confidence

 

“Faith is a living, daring confidence in God’s grace, so sure and certain that a man could stake his life on it a thousand times”

-Martin Luther

 

Faith is a living, daring confidence. Wow! What language from Martin Luther. And his life certainly had to thrive off of daring. It’s not often we think of someone having to take a stand, and in this case, he took a stand to create a new branch of Christianity, Lutheranism.

When the Roman Catholic church solicited more funds for building St. Peter’s Basilica, Luther wrote 95 Theses to protest and foment discussion. He felt it was using money to excess, and disagreed that the pope was the only liaison to God. And due to the recent printing press, it spread all over Europe in two months, a communications miracle!

 

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He meant it for discussion, but was excommunicated from the Roman Catholic church, and ostracized by thousands. But he kept going.

Still, Martin Luther’s life had challenges. He felt distanced from God, separated from inspiration and connection to life. He was always searching for the Truth, and it was a struggle.  He became a monk, a theologist, leader of a church, and always, a sincere seeker of Truth.

So what is the point for us? Well, it’s not really about being Roman Catholic or Protestant! But it is about claiming rights for yourself and others where you can. And, using technology to spread the word!

 

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What do you need to take a stand for today?

With Gratitude for the Truth,

Pamela

 


Born in Germany in 1483, Martin Luther became one of the most influential figures in Christian history when he began the Protestant Reformation in the 16th century. He called into question some of the basic tenets of Roman Catholicism, and his followers soon split from the Roman Catholic Church to begin the Protestant tradition.

Martin Luther was born on November 10, 1483, in Eisleben, Saxony, in modern southeast Germany.  In 1501, Martin Luther entered the University of Erfurt, where he received a Master of Arts degree (in grammar, logic, rhetoric and metaphysics). However, in July 1505, Luther had a life-changing experience that set him on a new course. Caught in a horrific thunderstorm where he feared for his life, Luther cried out to St. Anne, the patron saint of miners, “Save me, St. Anne, and I’ll become a monk!” The storm subsided and he was saved.

The first few years of monastery life were difficult for Martin Luther, as he did not find the religious enlightenment he was seeking. Upon his return to Germany, he enrolled in the University of Wittenberg in an attempt to suppress his spiritual turmoil. He excelled in his studies and received a doctorate, becoming a professor of theology at the university.Through his studies of scripture, Martin Luther finally gained religious enlightenment.

In 1517, Pope Leo X announced a new round of indulgences to help build St. Peter’s Basilica. On October 31, 1517, an angry Martin Luther nailed a sheet of paper with 95 theses on the university’s chapel door. Though he intended these to be discussion points, the Ninety-Five Theses laid out a devastating critique of the indulgences as corrupting people’s faith. Luther also sent a copy to Archbishop Albert Albrecht of Mainz, calling on him to end the sale of indulgences. Aided by the printing press, copies of the Ninety-Five Theses spread throughout Germany within two weeks and throughout Europe within two months.

Luther publicly declared that the Bible did not give the pope the exclusive right to interpret scripture. In January 1521, Martin Luther was officially excommunicated from the Roman Catholic Church. Miraculously, he was able to avoid capture and began organizing a new church, Lutheranism. He gained many followers and got support from German princes. In 1525, he married Katharina von Bora, a former nun who had abandoned the convent and taken refuge in Wittenberg. Together, over the next several years, they had six children.

Martin Luther is one of the most influential and controversial figures in the Reformation movement. His actions fractured the Roman Catholic Church into new sects of Christianity and set in motion reform within the Church. A prominent theologian, his desire for people to feel closer to God led him to translate the Bible into the language of the people, radically changing the relationship between church leaders and their followers.

Bio Source: Wikipedia, Encyclopaedia Britannica.


Fig¹.  Photo by Zo on flickr
Fig².  Photo by Elyssa Fahndrich

 

 

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: “All the Other Things We Think Make Us Happy Are Actually Just Ways of Getting More Family and Friends.” – Daniel Todd Gilbert

 

“We are happy when we have family, we are happy when we have friends and almost all the other things we think make us happy are actually just ways of getting more family and friends.”

– Daniel Todd Gilbert

 

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Let’s be grateful for all the happiness in our lives today. To truly cherish family, call a long-lost friend, or spend less time on work — and more time on someone.  

All the ‘someones’ in our lives are what give us joy. Appreciate!

Love,

Pamela

 


Daniel Todd Gilbert (born November 5, 1957) is Professor of Psychology at Harvard University. He is a social psychologist known for his research (with Timothy Wilson of the University of Virginia) on affective forecasting, with a special emphasis on cognitive biases such as the impact bias. Gilbert authored Stumbling on Happiness, which won the 2007 Royal Society Prizes for Science Books, adding to his list of numerous awards for his teaching and research. A high school dropout at age 19, he aspired to be a science fiction writer but when a creative writing class he wanted to take was full he took up psychology instead at University of Colorado Denver and Princeton University. He also wrote essays that appeared in The New York Times and TIME, among others, and penned short stories that were published in Amazing Stories, Isaac Asimov’s Science Fiction Magazine and many other magazines and anthologies. He is the co-writer and host of the NOVA television series This Emotional Life. He and his wife Marilynn Oliphant live in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Bio Source: Wikipedia


Fig¹.  Photo by mentatdgt on Pixeles 

Leadership Series: Mario Andretti’s Fast Lane To America, Part Four of Four

 

This is Part Four of Four in the Series on “Mario Andretti’s Fast Lane to America”.  Please click these links to read parts One, Two, and Three.

 

Thank you for joining me on this Leadership Series: How To Become a Leader; Practical Steps to Following Your Passion.

We’ve seen world-renowned car racer Mario Andretti follow his passion since he was a teenager, and become an award-winning driver! He’s stayed grounded, family-oriented and still involved with his passion of cars.

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What do you do next?

 

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You can give back.

Successful people find a way to help others, because they know they have been helped.

No one does it alone.

And that’s what he does!

On philanthropy, Mario states:

 

“You try to channel it in areas where you know it’s going to make a difference,” he said. “You try to do those things as the opportunity comes along. These are all the things that at the end of the day, it makes you feel good that I made a little bit of a difference, and that’s meaningful.”6

-Mario Andretti

 

Mario gives back through Meals on Wheels, to help the elderly and housebound attain food security. In honor of Mario, we are also giving back — we’ve chosen Nepal Orphans Home Inc. project for fresh food and Rural Communities Empowerment Center’s project to bring technology and resources to communities in great need. In that way we honor his passion and his philanthropy.

Thank you joining us on our Leadership Series: How To Become a Leader; Practical Steps to Following Your Passion.

We are so glad you joined us in learning about Mario Andretti’s successful life. If it a world class race driver can make it by starting out in a refugee camp, you can too. Follow your passion, gain experience and then give back.

I thank you for being the great leader you are, and look forward to you sharing your journey! We will all look forward to hearing!

You’re Leading,

Pamela

 


Mario Andretti is an extremely successful race car driver and the only race car driver to have ever won the Indianapolis 500, the Daytona 500, and the Formula One World Championship. Mario, and his fraternal twin brother Aldo, were born in the former territory known as Istria. At the end of World War II, the territory was annexed by Yugoslovia and the Andretti family left in 1948 during what’s known as the Istrian exodus. They ended up in a refugee camp in Lucca, Italy, where his father would work hard labor jobs before they received the visa to join his uncle in Pennsylvania. Mario and his brother Aldo rebuilt a 1948 Hudson Commodore and began racing it. Aldo won the coin toss to do the first race and he won. Aldo went on to fracture his skull in a serious crash, but he would return later on. In 1969, Aldo suffered severe damage after crashing into a fence during an IMCA race and he quit racing.

In 1961, he married Dee Ann Andretti and they had three children together. Their two sons, Jeff and Michael, would also become race car drivers. Following Mario’s retirement, he has spent his time in a multitude of ways—including volunteering with Meals on Wheels deliveries in Pennsylvania. With his late wife Dee Ann, he was also involved with a number of local children’s charities.


Citation: ⁶ Ryan, Natem “Mario Andretti saluted for his charity work: ‘I love positive’”, NBC Sports, April 14, 2015, https://motorsports.nbcsports.com/2015/04/14/mario-andretti-saluted-for-his-charity-work-i-love-positives/
Fig. ¹⁰: Photo by Jim Culp retrieved from Flickr, https://www.flickr.com/photos/jimculp/29455644593
Fig. ¹¹: Photo by William on Unsplash

Leadership Series: Mario Andretti’s Fast Lane To America, Part Three of Four

 

This is Part Three of Four in the Series on “Mario Andretti’s Fast Lane to America”.  Please click these links to read parts One and Two.

 

Thank you for joining our Leadership Series: How To Become a Leader     

We feature real-life stories on how people became successful leaders, so you can too. We show you Practical Steps and Stories to Following Your Passion, leading you to your own success. Our feature today is on Mario Andretti, a world-class racer who started out in a refugee camp. Join us as we continue to explore his life story!

Within 20 years, Mario was a world-renowned racer. He was living his dream, and in America. He was married with children and awards and all. What to do next?

Beautifully and interestingly enough, Mario stayed true to his roots. He still lives in Nazareth, Pennsylvania and still spends time in his garages. He stays humble. He stays grounded. He still loves his cars. His life is very consistent.

 

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“I love spending time in the garages on either side of our house. I have 9 cars in all, including a Lamborghini and a Corvette.”5

-Mario Andretti

 

So that’s a good lesson. Even when he can retire, he still pays attention to his cars.  He takes care of them and loves them and drives them.

 

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He drives to his passion and his passion drives his life.   It’s a great life partnership, one can have with one’s passion for one’s entire life!

You can do this too. You call follow your passion, and live your full life.

 

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What a beautiful story. Let’s find our passion, and stay true to humble dreams. They will happen!

Dreams Are Happening for You,

Pamela

 

Stay tuned for Part Four of the Four Part Series “Mario Andretti’s Fast Lane to America” tomorrow!

 


Citation: ⁵ Mybers, Marc, Ibid.
Fig. ⁷: Photo by Raul Varzar on Unsplash
Fig. ⁸: Racingone/ ISC Archives via Getty Images, retrieved from https://www.mcall.com/sports/motorracing/mc-mario-andretti-indy500-1981-unser-20160512-story.html
Fig. ⁹: Photo by chuttersnap on Unsplash

 

 

Leadership Series: Mario Andretti’s Fast Lane To America, Part Two of Four

 

This is Part Two of Four in the Series on “Mario Andretti’s Fast Lane to America”. Please click here to start from the beginning!

 

Thank you for joining our Leadership Series: How To Become a Leader     

We feature real-life stories on how people became successful leaders, so you can too. We show you Practical Steps and Stories to Following Your Passion, leading you to your own success. Our feature today is on Mario Andretti, a world-class racer who started out in a refugee camp. Join us as we continue to explore his life story!

The Mario Andretti family was on its way from war-torn Italy to America.  They had been working in car shops, learning, gaining experience. Heads-down, hands-in-car-parts operations. Learning, learning, learning. With perseverance, they followed their dreams.

 

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With patience, visas came three years later. Their family migrated to Pennsylvania where family resided. Always an observer, after dinner one night in Pennsylvania, Mario and his brother saw something flashing in the distance as well as loud sounds. They soon found it was their love! It was the explosion of a car engine!

 

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They literally ran towards their passion, which was about a mile away and featured a racetrack. They had a high-end taste in cars due to being from Italy and their work on Formula 1 cars. While these cars were different, the boys kept showing up at the track. Experience built upon experience. It was time to build their own car for the first time: a 1948 Hudson Commodore.

To get in at the race track, they stated they were 19 and 21 years old, racers from Italy. Soon, Aldo and his brother, Mario, each won two of the first four stock-car races. 4 They won nearly $150 and used that to build their next car.5 Their passion was on their way! Instead of working on cars, they were now building them — and racing them!  

 

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Now Mario is considered one of the top race car drivers in the world. He’s won the 1978 Formula One World Championship races and most specifically, the top IndyCar race, 4 times. He’s known for being the only driver to win the NASCAR Cup Series, Formula One and an Indianapolis 500.

 

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So you can follow your passion, too, and realize success. Mario is a good man, and he did it. You can be a good person, and you can do it.

 

Follow Passion = Realize Success,

Pamela

 

Stay tuned for Part Three of the Four Part Series “Mario Andretti’s Fast Lane to America” tomorrow!

 


Citations: ³ Myers, Marc “Mario Andretti: From Italian Refugee Camp to the Winner’s Circle at Indy”, The Wall Street Journal, July 31, 2018, https://www.wsj.com/articles/how-mario-andretti-one-of-the-fastest-americans-ever-discovered-his-speed-1533047673
Fig. ³: Photo by Vance Osterhout on Unsplash
Fig. ⁴: Photo by Oscar Sutton on Unsplash
Fig. ⁵: Photo by MiRo Am on Unsplash
Fig. ⁶: Amy Hollowbush, contributed photo retrieved from https://www.mcall.com/sports/motorracing/mc-mario-andretti-daytona-500-5020170221-story.html

Leadership Series: Mario Andretti’s Fast Lane to America, Part One of Four

 

This is Part One of Four in the Series on “Mario Andretti’s Fast Lane to America”.

 

Thank you for joining our Leadership Series: How To Become a Leader     

We feature real-life stories on how people became successful leaders, so you can too. We show you Practical Steps and Stories to Following Your Passion, leading you to your own success. Our feature today is on Mario Andretti, a world-class racer who started out in a refugee camp. Join us as we explore his life story!

Before Mario Andretti first came to America, his life wasn’t glamorous. His family of six was housed in a couple of rooms in a college dormitory in a refugee camp in Italy, right at the end of World War II. 

 

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His uncle was able to find a job for his father at a cement factory and so they came over to America.Mario was grateful to be in America and felt life could only go up.

 

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While his father was applying for the visa to come to America, he and his brother, Aldo, happened to be playing in a cul-de-sac. One day they saw some cars speeding by. They were able to locate them at a local car shop in a parking garage across from where they lived.

The Andretti brothers had the courage to go and meet the owners. And really, that was the start of their dreams. They went to help, observe and eventually work on cars there after school.For a start, they were allowed to park them in garage. Even this gave him a feel and love of cars. He and his brother Aldo continued to work at the shop and obtained a strong love for Italian cars. Unbeknownst to the brothers they would in the future attend races such as the 1954 Italian Grand Prix, and win races such as Daytona.

What an amazing pursuit of one’s dreams.

They saw cars.

They explored.

They followed their interests.

They met the owners.

They offered to help.

 

They were on their way to becoming world class racers by doing the above. Above doesn’t sound overly exciting or world class, but it’s following your passion, offering help, getting experience. That’s how you achieve your dreams! It’s that simple! And, that much daily, hard work.

 

So let’s watch this story closely.  Humble backgrounds and they followed a lead about which they were excited. You can do this, too!  This could be you start to being a successful engineer, the first woman flutist in South Congo, a first-time CEO or a new entrepreneur. You can do it, too.

You Can Do It, Too.

Pamela

 

Stay tuned for Part Two of the Four Part Series “Mario Andretti’s Fast Lane to America” tomorrow!

 


Citations:
1 Myers, Marc “Mario Andretti: From Italian Refugee Camp to the Winner’s Circle at Indy”, The Wall Street Journal, July 31, 2018, https://www.wsj.com/articles/how-mario-andretti-one-of-the-fastest-americans-ever-discovered-his-speed-1533047673
² Ibid.
Fig.1: Photo by Bailey Scully on Unsplash
Fig.2: Photo by Matt Antonioli on Unsplash