Tag Archives: justice

The Classic Pamela Positive: Read This If You Want To Know How You are Measured

 

 

“Don’t ever think that your grades are the measure of your capacity to change the world, because they’re not. 

Don’t ever think that your income is a measure of your capacity to change the world, because it’s not.

 There’s a different metric system if you want to change the world.”

 –       Bryan Stevenson

 

 

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There’s a different way to look at the world. It’s not about your grades.

It’s not about how much money you make. It’s not about your beauty.

 

 

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If you want to change the world, you have to come up with a different measurement system. You have to say and

 

make sure that things count that sometimes the world says doesn’t count.

 

I’m counting all the positive things about you,

Pamela

 

 

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Be Loyal To Those Who Are Not Present” — Steven Covey

            “One of the most important ways to manifest integrity is to be loyal to those who are not present. In doing so, we build the trust of those who are present. When you defend those who are absent, you retain the trust of those present.”

Stephen Covey, Author of 7 Habits of Highly Effective People

 

How easy it is to make that small comment on the side: to slight the person, who slighted you. Maybe you were kinder, but you still wanted to do that little jab back. You’re probably embarrassed and can hardly admit it to yourself…

 

 

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No matter what someone has done to you, you have a job. That’s right, it’s a job, it’s a position, it’s a role, it’s a calling in life, it’s the gift of your life. You can take a stand for goodness.

 

 

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You can take a stand for truth. You can break—the—chain.

As Steven Covey, one of our greatest leadership writers admonishes us, if you want to demonstrate true integrity, “be loyal to those not present.” That means you uphold the positive virtues and see the goodness in their lives. We start with that. It also means that if you do need to be open and honest, you can do so in a kind and loving way.  You do this in their presence (not others’ presence).

What does that mean if you speak negatively when they’re not present?

You’re doing it for your own ego, your own self-satisfaction, and building up your own sense of “justice.” Do you really think speaking  pejoratively about others is going to lift yourself up? In fact, it’s going to tear you down. If you try to pull others down, you pull down your own integrity: You pull yourself down with them.

 

 

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Being loyal to those not present builds trust. In essence, what Steven Covey is saying is, be gracious. Uphold others’ character — and your own character — by speaking well of others and expecting their best.

That brings about the best for everyone! And about the best in your life, too!

Speak well,

Pamela

 

 


 

 

Stephen Covey was a professor and author, writer of The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People. His work focused primarily on leadership, family and living with principle. He was a professor at the Jon M. Huntsman School of Business at Utah State University. When he was younger he played sports but an injury in his youth switched his focus from athletics to academics. He attended the University of Utah for his undergraduate degree and attended Harvard for his MBA. Although he earned his doctorate from Brigham Young University, he has also been awarded ten more honorary doctorates. He was also a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. In his spare time, he enjoyed cycling and giving keynote addresses. He and his wife, Sandra, have nine children and fifty-two grandchildren. 

The Classic Pamela Positive: May Your Work Bring Just and Lasting Peace

 

President Lincoln advised us…

 

“Whatever work you are devoted to….may it bring just and lasting peace.”

 

Our respected President Abraham Lincoln brought this to light in his 1865 Inaugural Address. What a calling for each of us to think, as we go about our work each day, how it can bring “just and lasting peace.”  And I think work here is not just our professional work, but any task to which we are devoting ourselves.  Any project, endeavor, activity — from raising a child to decorating a Valentine’s Day wreath — can have kindness, justice and peace as a necessary ingredient to our performing of it.

 

 

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President Lincoln says something instrumental here: As we strive for our goal, it should be peace brought between each one us, and then also with all countries. The point here is that gentle justice, no matter how small, and a caring, kind sense of peacefulness in all our interactions, bring that sense of worldwide peace. And it must start with ourselves, our conversations, our actions between each person we meet. That’s a great calling for us in living rightly every day!

 

 


 

 

Abraham Lincoln (February 12, 1809 – April 15, 1865) served as the 16th President of the United States. Lincoln led the United States through the American Civil War and in so doing, preserved the Union, ended slavery, strengthened the national government. He promoted rapid modernization of the economy through banks, canals, railroads and tariffs to encourage the building of factories. He is admired for his commitment to national unity, equal rights, liberty, and democracy in America. 

The second child of Thomas Lincoln and Nancy Lincoln,  Abraham was self-educated, and became a country lawyer, a Whig Party leader, Illinois state legislator during the 1830s, and a one-term member of the United States House of Representatives during the 1840s. Married to Mary Todd in 1842, he was an affectionate husband and father of four children.

Bio Source: Wikipedia: Abraham_Lincoln

The Classic Pamela Positive: Faith is a Living, Daring Confidence

 

“Faith is a living, daring confidence in God’s grace, so sure and certain that a man could stake his life on it a thousand times”

– Martin Luther

 

Faith is a living, daring confidence. Wow! What language from Martin Luther. And his life certainly had to thrive off of daring. It’s not often we think of someone having to take a stand, and in this case, he took a stand to create a new branch of Christianity, Lutheranism.

 

When the Roman Catholic church solicited more funds for building St. Peter’s Basilica, Luther wrote 95 Theses to protest and foment discussion. He felt it was using money to excess, and disagreed that the pope was the only liaison to God.  And due to the recent printing press, it spread all over Europe in two months, a communications miracle!

 

 

 

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He meant it for discussion, but was excommunicated from the Roman Catholic church, and ostracized by thousands. But he kept going.

 

Still, Martin Luther’s life had challenges. He felt distanced from God, separated from inspiration and connection to life. He was always searching for the Truth, and it was a struggle.  He became a monk, a theologist, leader of a church, and always, a sincere seeker of Truth.

 

So what is the point for us? Well, it’s not really about being Roman Catholic or Protestant! But it is about claiming rights for yourself and others where you can. And, using technology to spread the word!

 

 

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What do you need to take a stand for today?

 

With Gratitude for the Truth,

Pamela

 

 


Born in Germany in 1483, Martin Luther became one of the most influential figures in Christian history when he began the Protestant Reformation in the 16th century. He called into question some of the basic tenets of Roman Catholicism, and his followers soon split from the Roman Catholic Church to begin the Protestant tradition.

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Martin Luther was born on November 10, 1483, in Eisleben, Saxony, in modern southeast Germany.  In 1501, Martin Luther entered the University of Erfurt, where he received a Master of Arts degree (in grammar, logic, rhetoric and metaphysics). However, in July 1505, Luther had a life-changing experience that set him on a new course. Caught in a horrific thunderstorm where he feared for his life, Luther cried out to St. Anne, the patron saint of miners, “Save me, St. Anne, and I’ll become a monk!” The storm subsided and he was saved.

The first few years of monastery life were difficult for Martin Luther, as he did not find the religious enlightenment he was seeking. Upon his return to Germany, he enrolled in the University of Wittenberg in an attempt to suppress his spiritual turmoil. He excelled in his studies and received a doctorate, becoming a professor of theology at the university.Through his studies of scripture, Martin Luther finally gained religious enlightenment.

In 1517, Pope Leo X announced a new round of indulgences to help build St. Peter’s Basilica. On October 31, 1517, an angry Martin Luther nailed a sheet of paper with 95 theses on the university’s chapel door. Though he intended these to be discussion points, the Ninety-Five Theses laid out a devastating critique of the indulgences as corrupting people’s faith. Luther also sent a copy to Archbishop Albert Albrecht of Mainz, calling on him to end the sale of indulgences. Aided by the printing press, copies of the Ninety-Five Theses spread throughout Germany within two weeks and throughout Europe within two months.

Luther publicly declared that the Bible did not give the pope the exclusive right to interpret scripture.   In January 1521, Martin Luther was officially excommunicated from the Roman Catholic Church.Miraculously, he was able to avoid capture and began organizing a new church, Lutheranism. He gained many followers and got support from German princes. In 1525, he married Katharina von Bora, a former nun who had abandoned the convent and taken refuge in Wittenberg. Together, over the next several years, they had six children.

Martin Luther is one of the most influential and controversial figures in the Reformation movement. His actions fractured the Roman Catholic Church into new sects of Christianity and set in motion reform within the Church. A prominent theologian, his desire for people to feel closer to God led him to translate the Bible into the language of the people, radically changing the relationship between church leaders and their followers.

 

 

 

 

This Is The Age Of A Human’s Right

 

Today is a day where anyone can say whatever they want.

 

 

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You can speak rudely to your boss

You can write a negative review

You can tell someone off and not feel badly (is that really true?)

You can state your rights, expect them to be heard and be enfranchised in every view point you have.

kyle g .jpg

This is the age of a human’s right. A human’s right to speak, a human’s right to voice their opinion, a human’s right to be heard, and

a human’s right to have things arighted.   

In so many cases, this is wonderful, just, and long-time coming. People have been abused and silent; their perpetrators have gotten away with it. Women have been beaten and neglected; children have been sold into slavery… They have never been able to look back, look forward, or get out.

rosemary k.jpg

Gay men have been discriminated against and disabled people have been quietly discriminated against, at times when they know it and at times when they don’t. Muslims, Christian Scientists, Sunnis, Muslim Uighurs, and Tibetan Buddhists have been vilified, shunned… In each country their injustices take place.

In the 1930s…the Salvadorian government took over the territory of thousands of native Indians. When the Indian populations revolted, the Salvadoran military killed thousands of the native population Now, only 10% indigenous people exist. 1

Tell me this isn’t revolting; it’s inexplicable how a human can do this to another human.

It cannot be. For these human rights, and every human’s right, we must take a stand.

 

 

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Practice kindness and doing the right thing.

While we take a stand in the present, we must also take a stand for the past. We have to acknowledge what happened under the Nazi era in Germany, we have to support Jewish people and their future heritage for something that happened seventy years ago. We have to help South Sudanese people, who have had fourteen- and fifteen-year old’s fleeing their lands for a decade, carrying their sisters on their backs, acting like mothers, because no one has them. According to News24, even more than 60% of South Sudan refugees don’t have parents. 2 They come to a new country, perhaps one not of their choosing, without family or support.

amevi-wisdom-457835-unsplash (1).jpg

Then we have Venezuela, where mangoes and avocados were plenty. People had strong rights to property and talent flew into the country from Italy, Portugal, Spain. So in the 1950s, did you know Venezuela was in 4th place for GDP per capita — worldwide? 3

And now if anyone brings up human rights, tries to adjust the constitution for better, they are bloodied, beaten, put in jail and killed. President Nicolás Maduro jails political activists, punishes and terrorizes those in jail, and keeps the opposition hushed. 4  El Helocoide is a jail, owned by the Bolivarian National Intelligence Service, that hosts hundreds number of people and where prisoners’ bones and spirits are broken, with 22 people per cell. Crammed in bodies, but hearts filled with righteousness.

And it happens in Venezuela in 2016 – Attorney General Luisa Ortega Díaz admitted the government and security forces killed hundreds during “Operation Peoples’ Liberation” (OLP).  Dozens more have been killed since. The security forces says that there were confrontations but the families say there were not confrontations. People are just killed at the whim of the government. 5

And this is happening in our current day. What can you do about it? Well, there are ways to help. Don’t get overwhelmed, because you can help

just one other person.

 

 

sebastian-leon-prado-438756-unsplash (1) (1).jpg

That’s right, help just one other person. If we all just helped one other person, then the entire world would be helped. We would help others, we’d be helping ourselves. So give back Sudan, Venezuela, and El Salvador today.

 

 

Citations:
1 Chapin, Mac, “The 500,000 Invisible Indians of El Salvador”, Cultural Survival Quarterly Magazine, September 1989, https://www.culturalsurvival.org/publications/cultural-survival-quarterly/500000-invisible-indians-el-salvador
2 “South Sudan’s refugee flow is often a children’s crisis”, Associated Press, April 15, 2018, https://www.news24.com/Africa/News/south-sudans-refugee-flow-is-often-a-childrens-crisis-20180415
3 Niño, José, “Venezuela Before Chavez: A Prelude to Socialist Failure, Mises Wire, May 4, 2017, https://mises.org/wire/venezuela-chavez-prelude-socialist-failure
4 Delgado, Antonio Maria, “ ‘Welcome to hell.’ Former Venezuelan political prisoner says he was tortured in jail”, July 20, 2018, https://www.miamiherald.com/news/nation-world/world/americas/venezuela/article215033815.html
5 “Venezuela: Events of 2016”, Human Rights Watch, https://www.hrw.org/world-report/2017/country-chapters/venezuela
Fig. 1: Photo by Rawpixel on Unsplash
Fig. 2: Photo by Kyle Glenn on Unsplash
Fig. 3: Photo by Rosemary Ketchum from Pexels
Fig. 4: Photo by Sandrachile on Unsplash
Fig. 5: Photo by Amevi Wisdom on Unsplash
Fig. 6: Photo by Sebastian Leon on Unsplash

 

This Is The Age Of A Human’s Right Series, Part Two

 

We’ve just read about the importance of injustice overturned from Series One on “This Is The Age Of A Human’s Right.”

 

So here we continue our conversation of a human, having their rights arighted. This is the age of a human’s right. A human’s right to speak, a human’s right to voice their opinion, a human’s right to be heard, and a human’s right to have things arighted. In so many cases, this is wonderful, just, and long-time coming. People have been abused and silent; their perpetrators have gotten away with it. Women have been beaten and neglected; children have been sold into slavery… They have never been able to look back, look forward, or get out.

While we take a stand in the present, we must also take a stand for the past. We have to acknowledge what happened under the Nazi era in Germany, we have to support Jewish people and their future heritage for something that happened seventy years ago. We have to help South Sudanese people, who have had fourteen- and fifteen-year old’s fleeing their lands for a decade, carrying their sisters on their backs, acting like mothers, because no one has them. According to News24, even more than 60% of South Sudan refugees don’t have parents. 1 They come to a new country, perhaps one not of their choosing, without family or support.

amevi-wisdom-457835-unsplash (1).jpg

Then we have Venezuela, where mangoes and avocados were plenty. People had strong rights to property and talent flew into the country from Italy, Portugal, Spain. So in the 1950s, did you know Venezuela was in 4th place for GDP per capita — worldwide? 2

And now if anyone brings up human rights, tries to adjust the constitution for better, they are bloodied, beaten, put in jail and killed. President Nicolás Maduro jails political activists, punishes and terrorizes those in jail, and keeps the opposition hushed.3 El Helocoide is a jail, owned by the Bolivarian National Intelligence Service, that hosts hundreds number of people and where prisoners’ bones and spirits are broken, with 22 people per cell. Crammed in bodies, but hearts filled with righteousness.

And it happens in Venezuela in 2016 – Attorney General Luisa Ortega Díaz admitted the government and security forces killed hundreds during “Operation Peoples’ Liberation” (OLP).  Dozens more have been killed since. The security forces says that there were confrontations but the families say there were not confrontations. People are just killed at the whim of the government.4

And this is happening in our current day. What can you do about it? Well, there are ways to help. Don’t get overwhelmed, because you can help

just one other person.

 

 

sebastian-leon-prado-438756-unsplash (1) (1).jpg

That’s right, help just one other person. If we all just helped one other person, then the entire world would be helped. We would help others, we’d be helping ourselves. So give back Sudan, Venezuela, and El Salvador today.

Citations:
1 “South Sudan’s refugee flow is often a children’s crisis”, Associated Press, April 15, 2018, https://www.news24.com/Africa/News/south-sudans-refugee-flow-is-often-a-childrens-crisis-20180415
2 Niño, José, “Venezuela Before Chavez: A Prelude to Socialist Failure, Mises Wire, May 4, 2017, https://mises.org/wire/venezuela-chavez-prelude-socialist-failure
3 Delgado, Antonio Maria, “ ‘Welcome to hell.’ Former Venezuelan political prisoner says he was tortured in jail”, July 20, 2018, https://www.miamiherald.com/news/nation-world/world/americas/venezuela/article215033815.html
4 “Venezuela: Events of 2016”, Human Rights Watch, https://www.hrw.org/world-report/2017/country-chapters/venezuela
Fig. 1: Photo by Amevi Wisdom on Unsplash
Fig. 2: Photo by Sebastian Leon on Unsplash

This Is The Age Of A Human’s Right Series, Part One

 

Today is a day where anyone can say whatever they want.

 

 

rawpixel 1.jpg

 

 

You can speak rudely to your boss

You can write a negative review

You can tell someone off and not feel badly (is that really true?)

You can state your rights, expect them to be heard and be enfranchised in every view point you have.

 

 

kyle g .jpg

This is the age of a human’s right. A human’s right to speak, a human’s right to voice their opinion, a human’s right to be heard, and

a human’s right to have things arighted.   

In so many cases, this is wonderful, just, and long-time coming. People have been abused and silent; their perpetrators have gotten away with it. Women have been beaten and neglected; children have been sold into slavery… They have never been able to look back, look forward, or get out.

rosemary k.jpg

Gay men have been discriminated against and disabled people have been quietly discriminated against, at times when they know it and at times when they don’t. Muslims, Christian Scientists, Sunnis, Muslim Uighurs, and Tibetan Buddhists have been vilified, shunned… In each country their injustices take place.

In the 1930s…the Salvadorian government took over the territory of thousands of native Indians. When the Indian populations revolted, the Salvadoran military killed thousands of the native population Now, only 10% indigenous people exist. 1

Tell me this isn’t revolting; it’s inexplicable how a human can do this to another human.

It cannot be. For these human rights, and every human’s right, we must take a stand.

 

 

sandra c.jpg

 

 

Practice kindness and doing the right thing.

 

You can start today!

Pamela

 

 


 

 

Citations:
1 Chapin, Mac, “The 500,000 Invisible Indians of El Salvador”, Cultural Survival Quarterly Magazine, September 1989, https://www.culturalsurvival.org/publications/cultural-survival-quarterly/500000-invisible-indians-el-salvador
Fig. 1: Photo by Rawpixel on Unsplash
Fig. 2: Photo by Kyle Glenn on Unsplash
Fig. 3:Photo by Rosemary Ketchum from Pexels
Fig. 4: Photo by Sandrachile on Unsplash