Tag Archives: joy

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Civility Is The Behavior That Marks…Share Common, Public, And Political Space” – Daniel Mendelsohn

 

“Civility is the behavior that marks mutual acknowledgment that we individuals share common, public, and political space. Think about the platforms through which you interact with people all day, the media that we call social, but if anything, have enhanced our ability to be asocial.

To screen every element of society, culture, and politics that doesn’t suit or flatter or soothe us; thereby, removing the necessity for civility in the first place.”

―Daniel Mendelsohn

 

Graciousness, goodness, civility—all of this helps us to maintain a sense of calm and peace. Did you know anxiety is one of the most prevalent challenges we face in the U.S.? Nearly one 1/5 of our population experiences it. Yet only 1/3 try to find help.1 They are hurting… and continue to hurt. 

 

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Where do we think this anxiety is coming from? First, it’s coming from disconnectedness. We aren’t really getting the nurturance and love that we need from one-on-one interactions. And those interactions need to be with people we don’t know, and with people we do.

With people we do know, we build upon positive loving actions that make them become habit and security. With people we don’t know, it enforces the need to extend ourselves, to spread love and to give back. Both are essential.

 

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If we want more civility, that means that we need to slow down. If we want more civility, that means less screen time. If we want more civility, that means that we care and express our love for more people. It’s that simple. And who doesn’t want to love more? So let’s try.

May you live a civil day today, may you live it with care for everyone in every word that you give out, in every touch, and every comment that you make. And in every thought, so that in our minds and in our actions, civility becomes the natural way again.

 

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How we all long for graciousness and civility!

With Graciousness,

Pamela

 


Daniel Mendelsohn is a classist, writer, and critic. A graduate of Princeton’s graduate school, he published work on Euripidean tragedy before he went on to become a contributor to publications such as The New York TimesOutThe Nation and more. He was born in Long Island and raised in Old Bethpage, New York. He received his undergraduate degree at the University of Virginia in Classics. He writes reviews on books, films, theater, and television. He has won Princeton University’s James Madison Medal in 2018, American Philological Association President’s Award for service to the Classics in 2014 and the American Academy of Arts and Letters award for Prose Style in 2014. Currently, he is a professor at Bard College. He is also the director of the Robert B. Silvers Foundation, which supports writers. In his free time, Mendelsohn enjoys watching television and going to the movie theater. He has two children and four siblings, including a brother who is a film director, another brother who is a photographer and a sister who is a journalist.

Bio Source: Wikipedia, Daniel Mendelsohn Official Website  Fig¹. Photo by Andrew Neel on Unsplash  Fig². Photo by Kira auf der Heide on Unsplash  Fig³. Photo by Naassom Azevedo on Unsplash  Citation: 1 “Facts & Statistics”, Anxiety and Depression Association of America, https://adaa.org/about-adaa/press-room/facts-statistics

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Enjoy When You Can, Endure When You Must”

 

“Enjoy when you can, and endure when you must.” 

— Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

 

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Two grand lessons today: Enjoy and Persevere.

There is so much to enjoy… and so important that we focus on it. It can be easy to be distracted into something that isn’t working when we really should enjoy and relish what is before us. It need not be a big event. It can be a small gratitude.

 

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Then, too, there are times to patiently persevere. Not all is easy, peaceful; at times we must stay the course, step by step, like a diligent marathon runner, committed to her course, unrelenting until the final finish line. It might not be a quick race, but more a matter of a marathon.

So stick with it, stay with it, and maintain your joy. I know it’s hard and I have felt it too.

We’re Committing, 

Pamela

 


Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749-1832) was a German poet, playwright, novelist, and natural philosopher, best known for his two-part poetic drama Faust, which he started around the age of twenty-three and didn’t finish until shortly before his death sixty years later. He is considered one of the greatest contributors to the German Romantic period. At the age of sixteen, in 1765, Goethe went to Leipzig University to study law as his father wished, though he also gained much recognition from the Rococo poems and lyrics he wrote during this period. In 1766 he fell in love with Anne Catharina Schoenkopf (1746-1810) and wrote his joyfully exuberant collection of poems Annette.

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe formally married Christiane Vulpius in October 1806. He was opposed to the church ceremony that was, at the time, the only way of being legally married, so, although she bore Goethe a son, August, in 1789, he didn’t marry her until the Napoleonic army sacked the city in which they lived.

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe now rests in the Fürstengruft or “Royal Tomb” in the “Historic Cemetery” in Weimar where his dear friend Schiller is also laid to rest. In honor of these two famous German men of letters, a statue of Goethe and Schiller now stands at the German National Theatre in Munich. UNESCO’S “Memory of the World” list includes the handwritten works of Goethe preserved by the Goethe-Schiller-Archive.

Bio Source: The Literature Network  Fig¹. nappy on Pexels  Fig². Caleb Jones on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “We Were Born To Succeed, Not To Fail.” – Henry David Thoreau

 

“We were born to succeed, not to fail.”

– Henry David Thoreau

 

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That is our life purpose. To follow our calling in our own specially designed way. And so we will succeed, because the measurement is solely on how you uniquely pursue your talents, goals, and qualities. Everyone has a different picture of success, his or her own beautiful expression.

I Love Your Expression,

Pamela


Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) was an author, philosopher, poet, abolitionist, and naturalist. He grew up in Massachusetts, into the “modest New England family” of John Thoreau, a pencil maker, and Cynthia Dunbar. He had two older siblings, Helen and John Jr., and a younger sister, Sophia. Thoreau’s birthplace still exists on Virginia Road in Concord. He studied at Harvard College between 1833 and 1837.

After college, he opened a grammar school with his brother in Concord, Massachusetts. During this time, he met Ralph Waldo Emerson who introduced him to other writers and encouraged him to publish his thoughts. He is the author of Walden, which is a philosophical argument for simple living and preservation of natural environment.  He also had other important writings on natural history, environmentalism and civil disobedience.

Bio Source: Wikipedia  Fig¹. Photo by Ian Stauffer on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: To Have A Positive Mindset: Think About Building Your Mind As You Would Your Dream Home

 

When you build a home, you have to have a vision. A vision of what you would like to create. If you have a negative vision of your home then it certainly is not going to become a beautiful home! So we need to maintain that vision, even when the going gets rough. Even if you run out of brick. Even if the paint color didn’t match the way you wanted it to. Even if you have to fumigate!

Hold the vision, and keep striving for it.

 

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So what has helped me during tough times is not just to focus on the positive, but on gratitude. Even in tough times there is something to be grateful for. If you are having a hard time in sales and partnerships, perhaps you can be grateful you uplifted that potential client’s day with a positive smile or sincere compliment…

On an entirely different level… if a natural disaster has occurred, you can still be grateful that the sun came out, as in many countries pollution blocks the sun. That a friend is near. That people are caring and helping.

 

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Even in a crisis, and often especially in a crisis, the greatest goodness of people comes out. We can find the good even when we don’t seem ‘to have or own much.’ True wealth comes from qualities of being loving, kind, sincere, genuine, giving. And how wonderful — that that wealth is available to each one of us, every moment.

 


Fig¹. Photo by Pixabay on Pexels  Fig². Photo by Priscilla Du Preez on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “We Need Each Other” – Sue Monk Kidd

 

When a suffering is shared, its weight is divided; and when a joy is shared, the delight is multiplied. We need each other.

- Sue Monk Kidd

 

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Oh, the joy of those words!

We need each other!

What a balm to the heart… we have to help each other, help each other through each step of life, and to care.

How love, companionship, and togetherness keep us all together!    

Let’s Cherish It,

Pamela

 


Sue Monk Kidd is a writer, novelist, and memoirist. She grew up in the Southern United States and her hometown of Sylvester, Georgia influenced her first and best-known book The Secret Life of Bees. As a worldwide acclaimed author, her fictional works are concentrated on the oppositions and successes of women. Kidd is inspired by Henry David Thoreau, Kate Chopin, Thomas Merton, Martha Burke, and Carl Jung as role models. Kidd is married to Sanford “Sandy” Kidd. The couple has two children, Bob and Ann. She has lived in Charleston and Mt. Pleasant, South Carolina, Florida, and currently resides in North Carolina.

Bio Source: Wikipedia  Fig¹.  Photo by Ivana Cajina on Unsplash