Tag Archives: joy

The Classic Pamela Positive: Give A Gift Every Day

 

Give a gift every day.

Send your friend’s birthday gift early.

See a gift that would be meaningful for someone you care about, and just buy it. Give it to them now.

Take the time to cook a meal for your partner or your roommate.  Take the time to cook a meal for yourself.

Smile at a person walking down the street.

Smile at a homeless person and stop and learn their name. There is the gift of knowing someone. Of acknowledging you care.

Be kind to yourself.

 

 

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Get in bed early.

Say three gratefuls before you fall asleep.

Say three gratefuls when you wake up.

Believe today is special.

Take time at lunch to be grateful for three more things.

Pay the phone bill for your roommate.

Drop off banana bread for your neighbor.

Give a lot. Expect little.

Smile at yourself in the mirror.

Work hard and attain the gift of devotion to something you believe in.

Work and leave early and give yourself a gentle night off, nurturing yourself.

Stop and look at nature. Any part of nature. The expanse of the sky; drifting clouds; a vibrant flower.

Give yourself the gift of awareness of how precious and beautiful life is every day.

The Classic Pamela Positive: The Most Positive Things You Can Say

 

Here are the top things you can say to make a relationship work, from All There Is:

You look great.

Can I help?

Let’s eat out.

I was wrong.

I am sorry.

I love you.

 

 

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Say Something Positive Today!!

 

 


 

 

All There Is by Dave Isay grew from the StoryCorps initiative, a project to record the oral histories of individuals.  StoryCorps has collected stories from more than 75,000 people, in an attempt to record the history of people who rarely appear in history books.  In 2010, Isay published another book from StoryCorps stories, Mom: A Celebration of Mothers from StoryCorps.  All There Is celebrates love, with heartwarming stories from real couples.  Leroy A. Morgan contributed the list quoted above.

The Classic Pamela Positive: Money Increases Happiness

 

Money increases happiness, according to Harvard University

But only when it is lifting people out of extreme poverty.  

 

 

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It essentially comes down to Maslow’s basic needs.  

If money can help you attain shelter, food and clothing — which eventually lifts you into the middle class –  then it does bring you happiness.

But little after that.

Once those basic needs are taken care of, we must go to higher needs for happiness.  Caring for people. Caring for ourselves. Doing the right thing. Living a simpler life.

According to Stephen G. Post, Director of Compassionate Care at Stony Brook University in New York, happiness was on a higher level during the Great Depression than it was at the turn of this century.  He attributes much of this to a simpler lifestyle.

Live simply; be happy.

 

 

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: “We Need Each Other” – Sue Monk Kidd

 

When a suffering is shared, its weight is divided; and when a joy is shared, the delight is multiplied.  We need each other.

– Sue Monk Kidd, First Light, Chapter: Availability.

 

 

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Sue Monk Kidd is a writer, novelist, and memoirist. She grew up in the Southern United States and her hometown of Sylvester, Georgia influenced her first and best-known book The Secret Life of Bees. As a worldwide acclaimed author, her fictional works are concentrated on the oppositions and successes of women. Kidd is inspired by Henry David Thoreau, Kate Chopin, Thomas Merton, Martha Burke, and Carl Jung as role models.

The Classic Pamela Positive: Do It Anyway

 

Do It Anyway

People are often unreasonable, irrational, and self-centered.
Forgive them anyway.

If you are kind, people may accuse you of selfish, ulterior motives.
Be kind anyway.

If you are successful, you will win some unfaithful friends and some genuine enemies.
Succeed anyway.

If you are honest and sincere, people may deceive you.
Be honest and sincere anyway.

 

 

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What you spend years creating, others could destroy overnight.
Create anyway.

If you find serenity and happiness, some may be jealous.
Be happy anyway.

The good you do today, will often be forgotten.
Do good anyway.

Give the best you have, and it will never be enough.
Give your best anyway.

In the final analysis, it is between you and God.  It was never between you and them anyway.

 


 

This poem is widely attributed to Mother Teresa, after it was found hanging on a wall in her home for children in Calcutta.  It is a revised version of “The Paradoxical Commandments,” written by Dr. Kent M. Keith.  You can read more about the story on our UniversalGiving blog, PhilanthroPost.

 

 

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: “A Good Time to Laugh Is Any Time You Can” – Linda Ellerbee

 

“A good time to laugh is any time you can”

– Linda Ellerbee

 

 

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Linda Ellerbee (born August 15, 1944) is an American journalist who is most known for several jobs at NBC News, including as a Washington, DC correspondent and host of the Nickelodeon network’s Nick News. Linda grew up in Texas, and attended Vanderbilt University, although she quit without graduating. At NBC, Ellerbee worked as a reporter on The Today Show. Her first anchor job was on the prime-time version of Weekend, with the sign-off phrase “And so it goes.” In 1987, Ellerbee and her life and business partner Rolfe Tessem left network news to start their own production company, producing programs including Nick News – a news program for children that received many awards. In 1992, Ellerbee was diagnosed with breast cancer and had a double mastectomy. Since then, Ellerbee spends much of her time speaking to groups about how she fought cancer and how women need to fight not only the disease and for better medical treatments of it, but to laugh in the face of cancer as well.

 

 

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Light Trumps Darkness, Every Time” – Jodi Picoult

 

“There’s always going to be bad stuff out there. But here’s the amazing thing: Light trumps darkness, every time. You can stick a candle into the dark, but you can’t stick the dark into the light.”

 

– Jodi Picoult

 

 

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So then we must do the same. No matter how tough your situation is, you can light a candle. It may be small but it is enduring. Bring that light into your worry, and the light will dispel the darkness– and pave a way!

 

 

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I’m lighting my candle,

Pamela

 

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Jodi Picoult is an American author with 14 million copies of her books in print worldwide. She wrote her first story at age 5, titled “The Lobster Which Misunderstood.” With a degree from Princeton University in writing and a master’s degree in education from Harvard University, Jodi took a variety of jobs before Nineteen Minutes became her first book to debut at #1 on the New York Times Best Seller list. In total, Jodi is the bestselling author of eighteen novels, five of which have been adapted for film and TV. Jodi, her husband Tim and their three children live in Hanover, New Hampshire with two Springer spaniels, a rescue puppy, two donkeys, two geese, one duck, eight chickens, and the occasional Holstein.