Tag Archives: joy

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Make Each Day Your Masterpiece.” – John Wooden

 

“Make each day your masterpiece.”

— John Wooden

 

Photo of Woman Raising Both Hands

 

Unmatched. That’s what Coach John Wooden is asking us to be.

To live a life unmatched each day — which is a masterpiece — means living according to your values.

When I usually think about a gargantuan goal, I think of something more along the lines of an Olympian. Yet it doesn’t always mean running (or winning) a marathon.

It is being your own masterpiece. That means today, you live with kindness in all the minute interactions you might have. It’s not just about doing your best, yet also treating others your best. You, your being and presence, are the kind masterpiece that positively affects the world.

From living your masterpiece as an individual, and on this basis of values — only then can you paint another masterpiece. Pick a passion… be it gardening, being an excellent bookkeeper, being elected to office, writing a short story, exploring the best hikes and appreciating nature… And step by step, create excellence. Get inducted into your own hall of fame.

But remember, the greatest hall of fame is… treating others your best.

 


John Robert Wooden (October 14, 1910 – June 4, 2010) was an American basketball coach. He was a member of the Basketball Hall of Fame as both a player (inducted in 1961) and as a coach (inducted in 1973). He was the first person ever enshrined in both categories. His ten NCAA national championships in a 12-year period while at UCLA are unmatched by any other college basketball coach. He was married to Nellie Riley for 53 years, and they had two children. After Nellie’s death, John had a monthly ritual until his own death 25 years later, of visiting her grave and writing her a love letter.

Bio Source: Wikipedia


Fig¹.  Photo by Daniel Reche on Pexels

 

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Better To Make a Few Mistakes Being Natural” – Dr. Benjamin Spock

 

“Better to make a few mistakes being natural than to do everything out of a feeling of worry.”

— Dr. Benjamin Spock

 

girl wearing pink camisole on brown plant during daytime

 

It’s better to make a few mistakes being natural.  It’s important to be who we are in a natural, real way.  If we get everything right, and are absolutely perfect, but it’s done with anxiety…. then it actually isn’t right, is it?

 

What we do needs to be done with care, love, calm.  With joy and sincerity…and since Dr. Benjamin Spock was a famous leader in parenting in the 40s, I’ll take his advice not only for parenting, but also for management.  And for our communications, how we live our lives, how we treat others…

 


Dr. Spock was an influential writer on childrearing, who advocated for increased flexibility and affection in the treatment of infants and children.  He was a pediatrician and his book entitled Baby and Childcare is one of the best selling books in history.  Aside from that work, he also published 12 other books.  He was an activist, involved in the anti-war movements in the 1960s and 1970s.  While at Yale University, he became an Olympic gold medalist in rowing.  He married Jane Cheney and they had two children together.

Bio Source: Wikipedia 


Fig¹.Photo by Steve Halama on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “I shut my eyes in order to see.” – Paul Gauguin

 

“I shut my eyes in order to see.” 

– Paul Gauguin

 

 

assorted-color paints and paintbrushes on white tarp

 

Paul Gauguin (1848-1903) was an artist who was renowned for his Post Impressionism painting in the 19th century. He was an innovator in the use of bold colors. At the same time, he also brought out the meaning of each subject. He balanced authenticity with innovation.

 

What we can learn from Paul Gauguin: Let’s ‘see’ differently. Don’t use your eyes.  Instead, use “meaning” to see.

 

 

Image result for Paul Gauguin

 

 

What’s meaningful to you? Be bold in recognizing it. You’ll see an amazing painting of goodness, kindness and abundance all around you, if you will just see.

 

 


Eugène Henri Paul Gauguin (7 June 1848 – 8 May 1903) was a leading French Post-Impressionist artist who was not well appreciated until after his death. Gauguin was born in Paris to Clovis Gauguin and Aline Chazal on June 7, 1848.His father, a 34-year-old liberal journalist, came from a family of entrepreneurs residing in Orléans. He was compelled to flee France when the newspaper for which he wrote was suppressed by French authorities.

Gauguin was later recognized for his experimental use of colors and synthetist style that were distinguishably different from Impressionism. His work was influential to the French avant-garde and many modern artists, such as Pablo Picasso, and Henri Matisse. Many of his paintings were in the possession of Russian collector Sergei Shchukin. He was an important figure in the Symbolist movement as a painter, sculptor, printmaker, ceramist, and writer. His bold experimentation with coloring led directly to the Synthetist style of modern art, while his expression of the inherent meaning of the subjects in his paintings, under the influence of the cloisonnist style, paved the way to Primitivism and the return to the pastoral. He was also an influential proponent of wood engraving and woodcuts as art forms.

In 1873, he married a Danish woman, Mette-Sophie Gad (1850–1920). Over the next ten years, they had five children.

BioSource: Wikipedia


Citations:

Fig¹.Photo by Taelynn Christopher on Unsplash

Fig².Photo by Irina on flickr

The Classic Pamela Positive: “We Were Born to Succeed, Not to Fail.” – Henry David Thoreau

 

“We were born to succeed, not to fail.”

– Henry David Thoreau

 

man sitting on mountain cliff facing white clouds rising one hand at golden hour

 

 

That is our life purpose. To follow our calling in our own specially designed way. And so we will succeed, because the measurement is solely on how you uniquely pursue your talents, goals and qualities. Everyone has a different picture of success, his or her own beautiful expression.

 

 

I Love Your Expression,

Pamela

 


Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) was an author, philosopher, poet, abolitionist, and naturalist. He grew up in Massachusetts, into the “modest New England family” of John Thoreau, a pencil maker, and Cynthia Dunbar. He had two older siblings, Helen and John Jr., and a younger sister, Sophia. Thoreau’s birthplace still exists on Virginia Road in Concord. He studied at Harvard College between 1833 and 1837.

After college, he opened a grammar school with his brother in Concord, Massachusetts. During this time, he met Ralph Waldo Emerson who introduced him to other writers and encouraged him to publish his thoughts. He is the author of Walden, which is a philosophical argument for simple living and preservation of natural environment.  He also had other important writings on natural history, environmentalism and civil disobedience.

Biosource: Wikipedia


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Fig¹.Photo by Ian Stauffer on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “I Am Here for a Purpose and That Purpose Is to Grow into a Mountain.” – Og Mandino

 

 

“I am here for a purpose and that purpose is to grow into a mountain, not to shrink to a grain of sand. Henceforth will I apply all my efforts to become the highest mountain of all and I will strain my potential until it cries for mercy.”

– Og Mandino

 

 

aerial view photography of mountains under cloudy sky

 

 


Og Mandino (1923-1996) is a well-known author.  His bestselling book, The Greatest Salesman in the World, sold more than 50 million copies.  His book was translated into 25 different languages. In addition, he served as the president of Success Unlimited Magazine, and was inducted into the National Speakers Association’s Hall Of Fame.

He was married to Bette Mandino for nearly forty years, and he described her as having “a lot more faith in me than I had in myself.”

Biosource: Wikipedia, ogmandino.com


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Fig¹. Simon Fitall on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Light Trumps Darkness, Every Time” – Jodi Picoult

 

“There’s always going to be bad stuff out there. But here’s the amazing thing: Light trumps darkness, every time. You can stick a candle into the dark, but you can’t stick the dark into the light.”

— Jodi Picoult

 

 

bokeh photography

 

 

So then we must do the same. No matter how tough your situation is, you can light a candle. It may be small but it is enduring. Bring that light into your worry, and the light will dispel the darkness– and pave a way!

 

 

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I’m lighting my candle,

Pamela

 


Jodi Picoult is an American author with 14 million copies of her books in print worldwide. She wrote her first story at age 5, titled “The Lobster Which Misunderstood.” With a degree from Princeton University in writing and a master’s degree in education from Harvard University, Jodi took a variety of jobs before Nineteen Minutes became her first book to debut at #1 on the New York Times Best Seller list. In total, Jodi is the bestselling author of eighteen novels, five of which have been adapted for film and TV.

Jodi, her husband Tim and their three children live in Hanover, New Hampshire with two Springer spaniels, a rescue puppy, two donkeys, two geese, one duck, eight chickens, and the occasional Holstein.

Bio source: Wikipedia


Citations:

Fig¹. Jack B on Unsplash

Fig². Paolo Nicolello on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: To Have a Positive Mindset: Think about Building your Mind as you would your Dream Home

 

 

When you build a home, you have to have a vision. A vision of what you would like to create.  If you have a negative vision of your home then it certainly is not going to become a beautiful home!   So we need to maintain that vision, even when the going gets rough. Even if you run out of brick. Even if the paint color didn’t match the way you wanted it to. Even if you have to fumigate!  Hold the vision, and keep striving for it.

 

 

four orange, green, blue, and red paint rollers

 

 

So what has helped me during tough times is not just to focus on the positive, but on gratitude. Even in tough times there is something to be grateful for.  If you are having a hard time in sales and partnerships, perhaps you can be grateful you uplifted that potential client’s day with a positive smile or sincere compliment…

 

On an entirely different level… if a natural disaster has occurred, you can still be grateful that the sun came out, as in many countries pollution blocks the sun. That a friend is near. That people are caring and helping.

 

 

man and woman hugging each other photography

 

 

Even in a crisis, and often especially in a crisis, the greatest goodness of people comes out.  We can find the good even when we don’t seem ‘to have or own much.’    True wealth comes from qualities of being loving, kind, sincere, genuine, giving. And how wonderful — that that wealth is available to each one of us, every moment.

 

 


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Fig¹. David Pisnoy on Unsplash

Fig². Priscilla Du Preez on Unsplash