Tag Archives: Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

The Classic Pamela Positive: “What Is My Life If I Am No Longer Useful To Others” – Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

 

 

“What is my life if I am no longer useful to others?” 

— Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

 

 

If you have ever lacked purpose, or feel out of alignment, know your life has purpose.  You don’t have to wait to find it.

 

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe is one of our most renowned writers, philosophers, and literary creators. He came from a wealthy family; he didn’t need to do a lot if he didn’t want to.  But he used his skills to create literature that made us think.  Additionally, top leaders of the day came to him to hear his thoughts, which were profound and inspirational. So not only did he create excellent works of literary art, but he also engaged world leaders with his deep thinking. They became better people, because of him. They sought him out for his thoughts.

 

We can learn from Goethe. The whole purpose of Life, and your life, is to bring some sort of goodness to the world.

 

 

Yes, it’s that simple. You might get a Ph.D.

 

 

man wearing white top using MacBook

 

 

and profoundly change how renewable energy powers our communities.

 

But you might also simply smile peacefully

 

 

woman smiling near tree outdoor during daytime

 

 

and joyously to all that come your way.

 

Both change the world.  One is immediate, one is long-term.

 

The point is your life can and must be useful to others.

 

Stop the boredom, the frustration, the hurt. Your life is needed now. Give your smile and devote your life to doing good. Goethe got it right!

 

 


Johann Wolfgang von Goethe was one of the rare giants of world literature. Throughout a long and full life, he demonstrated his prolific genius in many different areas. Goethe was born August 28, 1749, in Frankfurt-am-Main, Germany, to a wealthy, middle-class family. He was educated at home by his father and tutors until he went to Leipzig to study law. Following his university graduation, Goethe returned to Frankfurt. His mind was filled with many exciting ideas, and he devoted himself to philosophical studies. It was here that he wrote his first important metrical drama and then the superb short novel. These aroused widespread interest and admiration.

On his return to Germany Goethe lived in a state of semi-retirement and concentrated on his studies, writing and cultivate his wide interests. In 1806 Goethe married a woman who was his mistress for many years, and had a son in 1789. As the years passed he became acquainted with many of the most prominent men of his time and was highly regarded by all. Napoleon Bonaparte was among his most famous admirers and remarked when they first met, “Vous êtes un homme,” (You are a man). By the time of his death, Goethe had attained a position of unprecedented esteem in the literary and intellectual circles. Because of the breadth of his thought, his comprehension of human nature and optimistic faith in the human spirit, and his intuitive grasp of universal truths, Goethe is regarded by many as the outstanding poet of the modern world. He died March 22, 1832, but his work lives in its meaning and value for modern day readers.

Bio source: Wikipedia


Citations:

Fig¹. Tim Gouw on Unsplush

Fig². Jamie Brown on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Enjoy When You Can, Endure When You Must”

 

“Enjoy when you can, and endure when you must.” 

— Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

 

 

Two grand lessons today: Enjoy and Persevere.

 

 

 

 

There is so much to enjoy… and so important that we focus on it.  It can be easy to be distracted into something that isn’t working, when we really should enjoy and relish what is before us.  It need not be a big event. It can be a small gratitude.

 

 

caleb-jones-131203-unsplash.jpg

 

 

Then, too, there are times to patiently persevere.  Not all is easy, peaceful; at times we must stay the course, step by step, like a diligent marathon runner, committed to her course, unrelenting until the final finish line.  It might not be a quick race, but more a matter of a marathon.

 


Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749-1832) was a German poet, playwright, novelist, and natural philosopher, best known for his two-part poetic drama Faust, which he started around the age of twenty-three and didn’t finish till shortly before his death sixty years later. He is considered one of the greatest contributors of the German Romantic period. At the age of sixteen, in 1765, Goethe went to Leipzig University to study law as his father wished, though he also gained much recognition from the Rococo poems and lyric he wrote during this period. In 1766 he fell in love with Anne Catharina Schoenkopf (1746-1810) and wrote his joyfully exuberant collection of poems Annette.

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe now rests in the Fürstengruft or “Royal Tomb” in the “Historic Cemetery” in Wiemar where his dear friend Schiller is also laid to rest. In honour of these two famous German men of letters, a statue of Goethe and Schiller now stands at the German National Theatre in Munich. UNESCO’S “Memory of the World” list includes the handwritten works of Goethe preserved by the Goethe-Schiller-Archive.

BioSource: The Literature Network

Citations:
Fig¹. Priscilla Du Preez on Unsplash
Fig². Caleb Jones on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: Divide and Rule…Unite and Lead

 

He was brilliant, insightful and troubled at times, too… but this is a great quote from Johann Wolfgang von Goethe:

 

“Divide and rule, a sound motto;

unite and lead, a better one.”

 

It’s sad sometimes how, per Goethe’s quote above, we at times need to separate into distinct groups in order to have harmony…but in a close future, the habit will be one of uniting…and so a better you, me, all of us.

 

 


 

 

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749-1832) was a German poet, playwright, novelist, and natural philosopher, best known for his two-part poetic drama Faust, which he started around the age of twenty-three and didn’t finish till shortly before his death sixty years later. He is considered one of the greatest contributors of the German Romantic period. At the age of sixteen, in 1765, Goethe went to Leipzig University to study law as his father wished, though he also gained much recognition from the Rococo poems and lyric he wrote during this period. In 1766 he fell in love with Anne Catharina Schoenkopf (1746-1810) and wrote his joyfully exuberant collection of poems Annette.

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe now rests in the Fürstengruft or “Royal Tomb” in the “Historic Cemetery” in Wiemar where his dear friend Schiller is also laid to rest. In honour of these two famous German men of letters, a statue of Goethe and Schiller now stands at the German National Theatre in Munich. UNESCO’S “Memory of the World” list includes the handwritten works of Goethe preserved by the Goethe-Schiller-Archive.

Bio Source: The Literature Network

The Classic Pamela Positive: Make Criticism Yield to You

 

“Against criticism a man can neither protest nor defend himself;

he must act in spite of it, and then it will gradually yield to him.”

 

-Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

 

 

runner-555074_640

 

 

No matter how hard it is, we have to face challenging feedback and take some step of action. It’s not easy… but the more we do it, the more we become accustomed to it. To being honest with ourselves… and to overcoming the challenge.

 

We grow, we excel, and we move on, up and over it.

 

With that honesty, as Goethe states, the criticism “will gradually yield to him.”

 

 


 

 

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749-1832) was a German poet, playwright, novelist, and natural philosopher, best known for his two-part poetic drama Faust, which he started around the age of twenty-three and didn’t finish till shortly before his death sixty years later. He is considered one of the greatest contributors of the German Romantic period. At the age of sixteen, in 1765, Goethe went to Leipzig University to study law as his father wished, though he also gained much recognition from the Rococo poems and lyric he wrote during this period. In 1766, he fell in love with Anne Catharina Schoenkopf (1746-1810) and wrote his joyfully exuberant collection of poems Annette.

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe now rests in the Fürstengruft or “Royal Tomb” in the “Historic Cemetery” in Wiemar where his dear friend Schiller is also laid to rest. In honour of these two famous German men of letters, a statue of Goethe and Schiller now stands at the German National Theatre in Munich. UNESCO’S “Memory of the World” list includes the handwritten works of Goethe preserved by the Goethe-Schiller-Archive.

Bio Source: The Literature Network

The Classic Pamela Positive: “What Is My Life If I Am No Longer Useful To Others” – Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

 “What is my life if I am no longer useful to others?” 

 

– Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

 

If you have ever lacked purpose, or feel out of alignment, know your life has purpose.  You don’t have to wait to find it.

The whole purpose of Life, and your life, is to bring some sort of goodness to the world.

 

 

tim-gouw-68319-unsplash.jpg

 

 

 

Yes, it’s that simple. You might get a Ph.D. and profoundly change how renewable energy powers our communities. But you might also simply smile peacefully and joyously to all that come your way.

Both change the world.  One is immediate, one is long-term.  

 

The point is your life can and must be useful to others.

 

Stop the boredom, the frustration, the hurt. Your life is needed now. Give your smile and devote your life to doing good. Goethe got it right!

 

 


johann-wolfgang-von-goethe-63161_1280

 

 

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe was one of the rare giants of world literature. Throughout a long and full life, he demonstrated his prolific genius in many different areas. Goethe was born August 28, 1749, in Frankfurt-am-Main, Germany, to a wealthy, middle-class family. He was educated at home by his father and tutors until he went to Leipzig to study law. Following his university graduation, Goethe returned to Frankfurt. His mind was filled with many exciting ideas, and he devoted himself to philosophical studies. It was here that he wrote his first important metrical drama and then the superb short novel. These aroused widespread interest and admiration.

On his return to Germany Goethe lived in a state of semi-retirement and concentrated on his studies, writing and cultivate his wide interests. In 1806 Goethe married a woman who was his mistress for many years, and had a son in 1789. As the years passed he became acquainted with many of the most prominent men of his time and was highly regarded by all. Napoleon Bonaparte was among his most famous admirers and remarked when they first met, “Vous êtes un homme,” (You are a man). By the time of his death, Goethe had attained a position of unprecedented esteem in the literary and intellectual circles. Because of the breadth of his thought, his comprehension of human nature and optimistic faith in the human spirit, and his intuitive grasp of universal truths, Goethe is regarded by many as the outstanding poet of the modern world. He died March 22, 1832, but his work lives in its meaning and value for modern day readers.

 

 

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: Divide and Rule…Unite and Lead

He was brilliant, insightful and troubled at times, too… but this is a great quote from Johann Wolfgang von Goethe:

 

“Divide and rule, a sound motto; unite and lead, a better one.”

 

It’s sad sometimes how, per Goethe’s quote above, we at times need to separate into distinct groups in order to have harmony…but in a close future, the habit will be one of uniting…and so a better you, me, all of us.

 

*****

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749-1832) was a German poet, playwright, novelist, and natural philosopher, best known for his two-part poetic drama Faust, which he started around the age of twenty-three and didn’t finish till shortly before his death sixty years later. He is considered one of the greatest contributors of the German Romantic period. At the age of sixteen, in 1765, Goethe went to Leipzig University to study law as his father wished, though he also gained much recognition from the Rococo poems and lyric he wrote during this period. In 1766 he fell in love with Anne Catharina Schoenkopf (1746-1810) and wrote his joyfully exuberant collection of poems Annette.

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe now rests in the Fürstengruft or “Royal Tomb” in the “Historic Cemetery” in Wiemar where his dear friend Schiller is also laid to rest. In honour of these two famous German men of letters, a statue of Goethe and Schiller now stands at the German National Theatre in Munich. UNESCO’S “Memory of the World” list includes the handwritten works of Goethe preserved by the Goethe-Schiller-Archive.

Bio Source: The Literature Network

The Classic Pamela Positive: Make Criticism Yield to You

runner-555074_640

“Against criticism a man can neither protest nor defend himself;

he must act in spite of it, and then it will gradually yield to him.”

–Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

 

No matter how hard it is, we have to face challenging feedback and take some step of action. It’s not easy… but the more we do it, the more we become accustomed to it. To being honest with ourselves… and to overcoming the challenge. We grow, we excel, and we move on, up and over it.   With that honesty, as Goethe states, the criticism “will gradually yield to him.”

 ******

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749-1832) was a German poet, playwright, novelist, and natural philosopher, best known for his two-part poetic drama Faust, which he started around the age of twenty-three and didn’t finish till shortly before his death sixty years later. He is considered one of the greatest contributors of the German Romantic period. At the age of sixteen, in 1765, Goethe went to Leipzig University to study law as his father wished, though he also gained much recognition from the Rococo poems and lyric he wrote during this period. In 1766, he fell in love with Anne Catharina Schoenkopf (1746-1810) and wrote his joyfully exuberant collection of poems Annette.

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe now rests in the Fürstengruft or “Royal Tomb” in the “Historic Cemetery” in Wiemar where his dear friend Schiller is also laid to rest. In honour of these two famous German men of letters, a statue of Goethe and Schiller now stands at the German National Theatre in Munich. UNESCO’S “Memory of the World” list includes the handwritten works of Goethe preserved by the Goethe-Schiller-Archive.

Bio Source: The Literature Network