Tag Archives: injustice

The Classic Pamela Positive – I Love What Howard Zinn Writes: Hope Is Not Certainty… But Being Open to Possibilities…

 

I love how Howard Zinn focuses on maintaining the human spirit. Throughout his life dedication to combatting injustice, striving to help those marginalized, and being involved in a brutal World War, Howard held his views of hope.

 

 

S_S_Hope

 

 

 

“…I intend to be the voice of reasonable optimism, to figure out a passage through this tough time. To have hope, one does not need certainty, only possibility.”

 

Let’s keep our minds open to the great possibilities which abound before us. There is always a way, a pathway, a new opportunity, a new possibility. A New Hope!

 

 


 

 

Howard Zinn (1922-2010) was a historian, author and activist.  He was a pilot in WWII, an experience which shaped his outspoken opposition of war.  He was a professor of political science for many years at Boston University as well as Spelman College.  He is best known for his book, A People’s History of the United States, presenting history from the point of the view of the marginalized

 

 

This Is The Age Of A Human’s Right

 

Today is a day where anyone can say whatever they want.

 

 

rawpixel 1.jpg

 

 

You can speak rudely to your boss

You can write a negative review

You can tell someone off and not feel badly (is that really true?)

You can state your rights, expect them to be heard and be enfranchised in every view point you have.

kyle g .jpg

This is the age of a human’s right. A human’s right to speak, a human’s right to voice their opinion, a human’s right to be heard, and

a human’s right to have things arighted.   

In so many cases, this is wonderful, just, and long-time coming. People have been abused and silent; their perpetrators have gotten away with it. Women have been beaten and neglected; children have been sold into slavery… They have never been able to look back, look forward, or get out.

rosemary k.jpg

Gay men have been discriminated against and disabled people have been quietly discriminated against, at times when they know it and at times when they don’t. Muslims, Christian Scientists, Sunnis, Muslim Uighurs, and Tibetan Buddhists have been vilified, shunned… In each country their injustices take place.

In the 1930s…the Salvadorian government took over the territory of thousands of native Indians. When the Indian populations revolted, the Salvadoran military killed thousands of the native population Now, only 10% indigenous people exist. 1

Tell me this isn’t revolting; it’s inexplicable how a human can do this to another human.

It cannot be. For these human rights, and every human’s right, we must take a stand.

 

 

sandra c.jpg

 

 

Practice kindness and doing the right thing.

While we take a stand in the present, we must also take a stand for the past. We have to acknowledge what happened under the Nazi era in Germany, we have to support Jewish people and their future heritage for something that happened seventy years ago. We have to help South Sudanese people, who have had fourteen- and fifteen-year old’s fleeing their lands for a decade, carrying their sisters on their backs, acting like mothers, because no one has them. According to News24, even more than 60% of South Sudan refugees don’t have parents. 2 They come to a new country, perhaps one not of their choosing, without family or support.

amevi-wisdom-457835-unsplash (1).jpg

Then we have Venezuela, where mangoes and avocados were plenty. People had strong rights to property and talent flew into the country from Italy, Portugal, Spain. So in the 1950s, did you know Venezuela was in 4th place for GDP per capita — worldwide? 3

And now if anyone brings up human rights, tries to adjust the constitution for better, they are bloodied, beaten, put in jail and killed. President Nicolás Maduro jails political activists, punishes and terrorizes those in jail, and keeps the opposition hushed. 4  El Helocoide is a jail, owned by the Bolivarian National Intelligence Service, that hosts hundreds number of people and where prisoners’ bones and spirits are broken, with 22 people per cell. Crammed in bodies, but hearts filled with righteousness.

And it happens in Venezuela in 2016 – Attorney General Luisa Ortega Díaz admitted the government and security forces killed hundreds during “Operation Peoples’ Liberation” (OLP).  Dozens more have been killed since. The security forces says that there were confrontations but the families say there were not confrontations. People are just killed at the whim of the government. 5

And this is happening in our current day. What can you do about it? Well, there are ways to help. Don’t get overwhelmed, because you can help

just one other person.

 

 

sebastian-leon-prado-438756-unsplash (1) (1).jpg

That’s right, help just one other person. If we all just helped one other person, then the entire world would be helped. We would help others, we’d be helping ourselves. So give back Sudan, Venezuela, and El Salvador today.

 

 

Citations:
1 Chapin, Mac, “The 500,000 Invisible Indians of El Salvador”, Cultural Survival Quarterly Magazine, September 1989, https://www.culturalsurvival.org/publications/cultural-survival-quarterly/500000-invisible-indians-el-salvador
2 “South Sudan’s refugee flow is often a children’s crisis”, Associated Press, April 15, 2018, https://www.news24.com/Africa/News/south-sudans-refugee-flow-is-often-a-childrens-crisis-20180415
3 Niño, José, “Venezuela Before Chavez: A Prelude to Socialist Failure, Mises Wire, May 4, 2017, https://mises.org/wire/venezuela-chavez-prelude-socialist-failure
4 Delgado, Antonio Maria, “ ‘Welcome to hell.’ Former Venezuelan political prisoner says he was tortured in jail”, July 20, 2018, https://www.miamiherald.com/news/nation-world/world/americas/venezuela/article215033815.html
5 “Venezuela: Events of 2016”, Human Rights Watch, https://www.hrw.org/world-report/2017/country-chapters/venezuela
Fig. 1: Photo by Rawpixel on Unsplash
Fig. 2: Photo by Kyle Glenn on Unsplash
Fig. 3: Photo by Rosemary Ketchum from Pexels
Fig. 4: Photo by Sandrachile on Unsplash
Fig. 5: Photo by Amevi Wisdom on Unsplash
Fig. 6: Photo by Sebastian Leon on Unsplash

 

This Is The Age Of A Human’s Right Series, Part Two

 

We’ve just read about the importance of injustice overturned from Series One on “This Is The Age Of A Human’s Right.”

 

So here we continue our conversation of a human, having their rights arighted. This is the age of a human’s right. A human’s right to speak, a human’s right to voice their opinion, a human’s right to be heard, and a human’s right to have things arighted. In so many cases, this is wonderful, just, and long-time coming. People have been abused and silent; their perpetrators have gotten away with it. Women have been beaten and neglected; children have been sold into slavery… They have never been able to look back, look forward, or get out.

While we take a stand in the present, we must also take a stand for the past. We have to acknowledge what happened under the Nazi era in Germany, we have to support Jewish people and their future heritage for something that happened seventy years ago. We have to help South Sudanese people, who have had fourteen- and fifteen-year old’s fleeing their lands for a decade, carrying their sisters on their backs, acting like mothers, because no one has them. According to News24, even more than 60% of South Sudan refugees don’t have parents. 1 They come to a new country, perhaps one not of their choosing, without family or support.

amevi-wisdom-457835-unsplash (1).jpg

Then we have Venezuela, where mangoes and avocados were plenty. People had strong rights to property and talent flew into the country from Italy, Portugal, Spain. So in the 1950s, did you know Venezuela was in 4th place for GDP per capita — worldwide? 2

And now if anyone brings up human rights, tries to adjust the constitution for better, they are bloodied, beaten, put in jail and killed. President Nicolás Maduro jails political activists, punishes and terrorizes those in jail, and keeps the opposition hushed.3 El Helocoide is a jail, owned by the Bolivarian National Intelligence Service, that hosts hundreds number of people and where prisoners’ bones and spirits are broken, with 22 people per cell. Crammed in bodies, but hearts filled with righteousness.

And it happens in Venezuela in 2016 – Attorney General Luisa Ortega Díaz admitted the government and security forces killed hundreds during “Operation Peoples’ Liberation” (OLP).  Dozens more have been killed since. The security forces says that there were confrontations but the families say there were not confrontations. People are just killed at the whim of the government.4

And this is happening in our current day. What can you do about it? Well, there are ways to help. Don’t get overwhelmed, because you can help

just one other person.

 

 

sebastian-leon-prado-438756-unsplash (1) (1).jpg

That’s right, help just one other person. If we all just helped one other person, then the entire world would be helped. We would help others, we’d be helping ourselves. So give back Sudan, Venezuela, and El Salvador today.

Citations:
1 “South Sudan’s refugee flow is often a children’s crisis”, Associated Press, April 15, 2018, https://www.news24.com/Africa/News/south-sudans-refugee-flow-is-often-a-childrens-crisis-20180415
2 Niño, José, “Venezuela Before Chavez: A Prelude to Socialist Failure, Mises Wire, May 4, 2017, https://mises.org/wire/venezuela-chavez-prelude-socialist-failure
3 Delgado, Antonio Maria, “ ‘Welcome to hell.’ Former Venezuelan political prisoner says he was tortured in jail”, July 20, 2018, https://www.miamiherald.com/news/nation-world/world/americas/venezuela/article215033815.html
4 “Venezuela: Events of 2016”, Human Rights Watch, https://www.hrw.org/world-report/2017/country-chapters/venezuela
Fig. 1: Photo by Amevi Wisdom on Unsplash
Fig. 2: Photo by Sebastian Leon on Unsplash

This Is The Age Of A Human’s Right Series, Part One

 

Today is a day where anyone can say whatever they want.

 

 

rawpixel 1.jpg

 

 

You can speak rudely to your boss

You can write a negative review

You can tell someone off and not feel badly (is that really true?)

You can state your rights, expect them to be heard and be enfranchised in every view point you have.

 

 

kyle g .jpg

This is the age of a human’s right. A human’s right to speak, a human’s right to voice their opinion, a human’s right to be heard, and

a human’s right to have things arighted.   

In so many cases, this is wonderful, just, and long-time coming. People have been abused and silent; their perpetrators have gotten away with it. Women have been beaten and neglected; children have been sold into slavery… They have never been able to look back, look forward, or get out.

rosemary k.jpg

Gay men have been discriminated against and disabled people have been quietly discriminated against, at times when they know it and at times when they don’t. Muslims, Christian Scientists, Sunnis, Muslim Uighurs, and Tibetan Buddhists have been vilified, shunned… In each country their injustices take place.

In the 1930s…the Salvadorian government took over the territory of thousands of native Indians. When the Indian populations revolted, the Salvadoran military killed thousands of the native population Now, only 10% indigenous people exist. 1

Tell me this isn’t revolting; it’s inexplicable how a human can do this to another human.

It cannot be. For these human rights, and every human’s right, we must take a stand.

 

 

sandra c.jpg

 

 

Practice kindness and doing the right thing.

 

You can start today!

Pamela

 

 


 

 

Citations:
1 Chapin, Mac, “The 500,000 Invisible Indians of El Salvador”, Cultural Survival Quarterly Magazine, September 1989, https://www.culturalsurvival.org/publications/cultural-survival-quarterly/500000-invisible-indians-el-salvador
Fig. 1: Photo by Rawpixel on Unsplash
Fig. 2: Photo by Kyle Glenn on Unsplash
Fig. 3:Photo by Rosemary Ketchum from Pexels
Fig. 4: Photo by Sandrachile on Unsplash

 

 

 

 

 

The Classic Pamela Positive – I Love What Howard Zinn Writes: Hope Is Not Certainty… But Being Open to Possibilities…

S_S_Hope

I love how Howard Zinn focuses on maintaining the human spirit. Throughout his life dedication to combatting injustice, striving to help those marginalized, and being involved in a brutal World War, Howard held his views of hope.

Continue reading

The Classic Pamela Positive – I Love What Howard Zinn Writes: Hope Is Not Certainty… But Being Open to Possibilities…

S_S_Hope

I love how Howard Zinn focuses on maintaining the human spirit. Throughout his life dedication to combatting injustice, striving to help those marginalized, and being involved in a brutal World War, Howard held his views of hope.

Continue reading