Tag Archives: Industry Inspiration

The Classic Pamela Positive: There Are Two Types of People, Says Winston Churchill…

 

“There are two types of people: those who see difficulty in every opportunity, and those who see opportunity in every difficulty.”

— Winston Churchill

 

 

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Be, see, and live opportunity.

 

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Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill was a British politician and Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1940 to 1945 and again from 1951 to 1955. Widely regarded as one of the greatest wartime leaders of the 20th century, Churchill was also an officer in the British army, a historian, a writer, and an artist. He is the only British Prime Minister to have received the Noble Prize in Literature, and was the first person to be made an honorary citizen of the United States. He was born into the aristocratic family of the Dukes of Marlborough, a branch of the Spencer family. Churchill married Clementine Hozier in 1908 and had five children: Diana, Randolph, Sarah, Marigold Frances, and Mary.

The Classic Pamela Positive: “If There Is No Struggle, There Is No Progress.” – Frederick Douglass

 

“If there is no struggle, there is no progress.”

– Frederick Douglass

 

 

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Thank goodness he struggled, persevered and progressed. It helped him, me and our entire world be fairer, more compassionate, and true in our relations with one another.

 

We all struggle. And we all face lovely times of hope and joy.  That joy is indeed waiting for you, which aids all mankind.

 

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Frederick Douglass (1818-1895) was an American social reformer, orator, writer and statesman. After escaping slavery, Douglass helped lead the abolitionist movement, acquiring a distinguished repertoire of his oratory and writing against slavery. He proved the slaveholders’ argument wrong in their claim that slaves did not possess the intellectual capacity to be independent American citizens. Douglass participated as an impressive player in changing history: rather than quietly living the rest of his life as a free man after escaping slavery, he risked that attainment to speak out for freedom and better treatment for all African Americans.

The Classic Pamela Positive: Why You, Me, the Night Building Manager, the Cleaners, Recyclers and Homeless People Have Something In Common: We Need to be Nourished

 

You, me, the night building manager, the cleaners and homeless people all have something in common: We need to be nourished.

 

The other night, I was helping lead a Full Circle Fund meeting, which is working to provide economic opportunities for people across our world.  It’s a wonderful group, focused on providing financial support and volunteer time to help serve the community.

 

 

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That evening, we had leftover sandwiches from dinner. While I usually take any leftovers from the meetings I attend to homeless people, I thought perhaps I would give myself a rest from it this evening. It was a huge tray I would have to balance, carrying my many bags as well. Yet something made me gather up the sandwiches, and hope there would be someone who would appreciate them.

 

 

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When I approached the night building manager downstairs, he was a bit hesitant at first… but after positive encouragement he took two and with much gratitude. Two of the cleaners said no, hesitantly… but when I spoke to them in Spanish, they took two to three sandwiches each! As I then turned outside, a lovely man cleaning the outdoor tiles in the rain lifted up his hood, smiled widely; and took two.

 

 

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I passed an elderly homeless man in a wheelchair underneath the cover of a prominent office building, who reached out to take two sandwiches as well. As I walked down the street, a gentle, petite Asian man, with bags and bags of recycling beside him, was persistently searching through the refuse to find more cans. He was so slight of frame and with a smile that beamed. He took the entire rest of the tray.

 

 

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Within five minutes, 15 sandwiches were given. And my heart was given to as well, filled by being able to help other people in one small way.

Make the effort to give, of whatever we may have. For we all need to be nourished.

 

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: Undertake Something So Great You Cannot Accomplish It Unaided

“We never become truly spiritual by sitting and wishing to become so. You must undertake something so great that you cannot accomplish it unaided.”

 

  – Phillips Brooks

 

Phillips Brooks, an educator and spiritual leader, advised us to push ourselves into the unknown for a special reason:

To become spiritual.

Well, you might ask, “Why is being spiritual so important? I simply want to create a great company, write a book, or scale Mount Kilimanjaro.”

The qualities it takes to do any of the above, and anything miraculous, are unseeable.

They are:

Perseverance: Don’t ever think of giving up…
Thoughtfulness and care in building a team…
Inspirational, being able to paint your vision in a way that excites others, impels them to take action…

You must have these qualities to build successful relationships and enduring companies.  Yet all of these are qualities which are not required in school, home or job.  And yet they are the invisible glue which will allow you “…to undertake something so great you cannot accomplish it unaided.”

They are not material or physical. They are spiritual.

 

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Phillips Brooks was an American clergyman in the Episcopal church during the 19th century. Before he joined the clergy, Brooks attended Harvard College and graduated at the age of 20. He moved on to become a schoolteacher, where he would be fired soon after. This led him to study in the Episcopal Church in Alexandria, Virginia. He published several books of lectures and sermons, as well as authoring the popular Christmas carol, “O Little Town of Bethlehem.” During the American Civil War, he supported the North and denounced slavery.  He was highly regarded as a preacher and a patriot.

The Classic Pamela Positive: How Mahatma Gandhi Teaches Us: To Be…Love and Change, Start with You Now

“You must be the change you wish to see in the world.”

– Mahatma Gandhi

 

The key word here from one of our greatest leaders is ‘be.’ Every day we have a chance to be. And the most important being is loving. Being kind, gracious, and helping others. That can start today. We can and should whisk away frustration, for every moment of frustration is one not spent on being the positive force we hope to be. What type of foundation are you building? One that crumbles from exhaustion and disbelief, cynicism? Or one of solidity, brick, by brick, with each brick contributing Principle, Love, Kindness, Grace, Strength, Truth, Joy…? As Gandhi says… the other key word here is ‘you.’ No one can do this for you. Not your partner, your parents, your best friend or your spouse.  You… are the being.

 

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Mahatma Gandhi was a political and spiritual leader during the Indian Independence movement. He preached resistance through non-violence and mass civil disobedience. He led the Indian National Congress and advocated for the end of poverty, for women’s rights and for independence from Britain. He also renounced religious violence and did several fasts in protest against it. Gandhi was deeply inspired by his Hindu faith, while also drawing on other religious philosophy, and advocating religious tolerance. He married Kasturbai Gandhi and they had four children together.

The Classic Pamela Positive: “The Greatest Mind is Always the Simplest.” – Russell Conwell

Now, the greatest mind is always the simplest.
Did you ever see a really great man?
Great in the best and truest sense?
If so, you could walk right up to him and say:
“How are you, Jim? “

 

-Russell Conwell, “Acres of Diamonds”

 

That’s right. The most amazing people are warm and accessible to all. That’s because they know everyone has a beautiful gift to give, and no one is greater. The greatest gift is being open and loving.



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Russell Conwell (February 15, 1843 – December 6, 1925) was an American Baptist minister, orator, philanthropist, lawyer, and writer. He is best remembered as the founder and first president of Temple University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and for his inspirational lecture Acres of Diamonds. The son of Massachusetts farmers, Conwell attended Yale University and after graduating enlisted in the Union Army during the American Civil War. He was ordained as a Baptist minister in 1880, and delivered his famous speech “Acres of Diamonds” over 6,000 times around the world. The central idea of the work is that one need not look elsewhere for opportunity, achievement, or fortune – the resources to achieve all good things are present in one’s own community. Conwell’s capacity to establish Temple University and his other civic projects largely derived from the income that he earned from the speech. The published version has been regarded as a classic of New Thought literature since the 1870s.

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Make the Most of the Abilities We Have” – Jim Abbott

 

“Never allow the circumstances of your life to become an excuse. People will allow you to do it. But I believe we have a personal obligation to make the most of the abilities we have.”

– Jim Abbott

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Jim Abbott is a former Major League baseball pitcher, who played despite having been born without a right hand. He played for teams including the California Angels, New York Yankees, and Chicago White Sox. In 1993, Abbott threw a no-hitter against the Cleveland Indians, and in 1988 pitched the final game to win the United States an unofficial gold medal in the Summer Olympics. Throughout his career, teams tried to exploit the fact that Abbott played with one hand, but their tactics were never effective. Today, Abbott works as a motivational speaker, living in California with his wife, two children and their dog. His parents still live in Michigan, where he grew up. Abbott and his family take the summer off each year to stay at the lake and visit with family and friends.