Tag Archives: harmony

The Classic Pamela Positive: “We Are All Sailing in the Same Boat” – Vladimir Kovalyonok

After an orange cloud — formed as a result of a dust storm over the Sahara and caught up by air currents — reached the Philippines and settled there with rain, I understood that we are all sailing in the same boat.

– Vladimir Kovalyonok

Vladimir Kovalyonok was a Soviet cosmonaut.  He was part of the space program from 1967 to 1984, and commanded three missions into space.  On his second mission, he spent 139 days in the Salyut Space Station, setting a new record for time in space.  He later served as the Director of the Moscow Zhukovski Military Air Force Engineering Academy, and is a Major General in the Air Force.

The Classic Pamela Positive: “We Are All Sailing in the Same Boat” – Vladimir Kovalyonok

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After an orange cloud — formed as a result of a dust storm over the Sahara and caught up by air currents — reached the Philippines and settled there with rain, I understood that we are all sailing in the same boat.

– Vladimir Kovalyonok Continue reading

The Classic Pamela Positive: “We Are All Sailing in the Same Boat” – Vladimir Kovalyonok

After an orange cloud — formed as a result of a dust storm over the Sahara and caught up by air currents — reached the Philippines and settled there with rain, I understood that we are all sailing in the same boat.

– Vladimir Kovalyonok

Vladimir Kovalyonok was a Soviet cosmonaut.  He was part of the space program from 1967 to 1984, and commanded three missions into space.  On his second mission, he spent 139 days in the Salyut Space Station, setting a new record for time in space.  He later served as the Director of the Moscow Zhukovski Military Air Force Engineering Academy, and is a Major General in the Air Force.

“We Are All Sailing in the Same Boat” – Vladimir Kovalyonok

After an orange cloud — formed as a result of a dust storm over the Sahara and caught up by air currents — reached the Philippines and settled there with rain, I understood that we are all sailing in the same boat.

– Vladimir Kovalyonok

Vladimir Kovalyonok was a Soviet cosmonaut.  He was part of the space program from 1967 to 1984, and commanded three missions into space.  On his second mission, he spent 139 days in the Salyut Space Station, setting a new record for time in space.  He later served as the Director of the Moscow Zhukovski Military Air Force Engineering Academy, and is a Major General in the Air Force.

Six Steps to a Happy Life: How it Applies to [Groups] – Norman Vincent Peale

Norman Vincent Peale was a prolific positive thought leader and thinker.   Below he wrote steps on how to create a harmonious family life, but I think it applies to groups too, so I subbed “groups” for family below.  Awesome advice. Really think about each step; I’ve been studying this for two years… great counsel!  Enjoy

1. Let it begin with you. To begin the process, one person within the group, perhaps you, determines that he or she will create within himself the upbeat spirit that can rejuvenate the group.

2. Ask yourself: “Am I personally contributing to the group’s happiness or unhappiness?” Be sure to answer that question with absolute honesty.

3. Correct any hostility within yourself. Practice treating everyone in the group with love and respect for his opinion.

4. Act lovingly. Consider yourself a “love cell.” Do not tell the group you have decided to be this new way.  Just be it. This new spirit will affect the group and, in time, they will respond accordingly.

5. Practice holding every other group member, young or old, in esteem as persons. Even if the attitudes and actions of one are not entirely pleasant, identity of personality must always be respected. On this basis, the group will hold together and the basic love within it will create a climate of good will and real understanding. This fact alone will help to change your life in the group.

6. Do not wait for someone else to start changing. And do not expect that everyone is going to change at once, or that change will come easily. There may be long-held resentments that will diminish only gradually. The principle factor is that someone must start the change and then allow the momentum to grow.