Tag Archives: happiness

The Classic Pamela Positive: “The Best Way Out Is Always Through” – Robert Frost

 

“The best way out is always through.”

― Robert Frost

 

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Our dear Poet has practical advice for us… we must take a step forward. You might be facing a challenge but you must find the way through.

We don’t have to be overwhelmed… we can simply take one step. One step towards progress. One step towards harmony. One step towards resolution!

Thank you, Robert Frost, for simply encouraging us. You must take a step! And, you will make it through.

I’m Taking My Step,

Pamela

 


Robert Frost (1874-1963) was a highly-regarded poet known for his depiction of rural life. He published his first poem in high school. He attended Harvard and he received an honorary degree from Harvard posthumously, as well as more than 40 other honorary degrees. Though Frost grew up in the city, he lived on farms later in his life. He was a professor at Amherst College, and at Middlebury College for 42 years. Some of his best-known poems include “The Road Not Taken,” “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening,” and “Nothing Gold Can Stay.” Frost married Elinor Miriam White and they had six children.

This particular quote is from the poem “A Servant to Servants” (1914). Many of Frost’s poems explore the splendor of the outdoors. However, “A Servant to Servants” is a contrast to the typical Frostian nature poem. Its speaker is the wife of a hard-working farmer who feels trapped in her life that seems meaningless. She explains her monotonous daily routine. The poem is written in iambic pentameter, although it varies in meter with no apparent rhyme scheme. A constant symbol in this poem is nature representing freedom, but it is a freedom that the speaker cannot attain.

Bio Source: Wikipedia  Fig¹.  Photo from Wikimedia

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Don’t Bunt. Aim Out Of The Ballpark.” – David Ogilvy

 

“Don’t bunt. Aim out of the ballpark. Aim for the company of the immortals.”

―David Ogilvy

 

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This is a beautiful clear message, especially in honor of our quirky, beloved Giants, about a clear focus. A focus that aims for the best, drives for excellence, and holds the highest standards in mind. Mr. Ogilvy did that with his advertising firm, and so we can choose to aim out of the ballpark in our chosen endeavor, too.

 


David Mackenzie Ogilvy (23 June 1911 21 July 1999) was an advertising executive, widely hailed as “The Father of Advertising,and the author of the book Ogilvy on Advertising, a general commentary on advertising. He was born in West Horsley, Surrey in England and his parents were Dorothy Blow Fairfield and Francis John Longley Ogilvy, the latter a classics scholar and a financial broker. David attended St Cyprian’s School, Eastbourne; Fettes College in Edinburgh; and Christ Church, Oxford.  While working as an AGA salesman he wrote The Theory and Practice of Selling the AGA Cooker, considered by Fortune magazine as the finest sales instruction manual written. The manual led to his next job as account executive at London advertising agency Mather & Crowther, run by his older brother Francis. After WWII and having worked as a chef, researcher, and farmer Ogilvy started his own advertising agency in New York called Ogilvy, Benson, and Mather, where David was its Chairman until he retired in 1973. In the 1980s he returned as Chairman of the companys India office, then as temporary Chairman of the agencys German office, and visited and represented the companys branches around the world.

Ogilvy married three times, the first two marriages ending in divorce: first to Melinda Street, where they had one child, David Fairfield Ogilvy; then to Anne Cabot; and later on, Herta Lans until his passing in 1999 at his home in Bonnes, France.  In 1967, he was made a Commander of the Order of British Empire (CBE), adding to his many honors and achievements. In his lifetime and onwards he established his advertising philosophys four basic principles: creative brilliance, research, actual results for clients, and professional discipline.  

Bio Source: Wikipedia  Fig¹. Photo by ogilvywashington on flickr

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Thinking Of The Things In My Life That Bring Me Pleasure Is A Peaceful And Positive Way To Start The Day.” – Warren Bennis

 

“Thinking of the things in my life that bring me pleasure is a peaceful and positive way to start the day — and a much better way to deal with a perceived failure than to ruminate on it.

When you’re down, think of the things you have to look forward to. When you are no longer in the grip of the mishap, then you are ready to reflect on it…

After reflection, the learning of the past is known, and the solution of the experience — the course of action we must take as a result — becomes clear. ”

- Warren Bennis

 

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I was honored to work in Leadership under Warren Bennis, a wonderful Business Leader. Ever calm and so very experienced, he taught us to look at life from an evaluative outlook.

What can I learn from this today?

How can I become better?

How will my life be better once I implement what I have learned?

 

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Take each step of life with great step of gratitude, goodness, and desire to grow. And upwards you go! With grace and peace. Thank you, dear Warren Bennis.

 


Warren Bennis was a pioneer in Leadership studies, writing numerous influential books on the subject, including Leaders and Leading For a Lifetime. He was raised in New Jersey and he enlisted in the U.S. Army in 1943. During his time in the U.S. Army, he received the Purple Heart and Bronze Star. After his time in the military, he went on to attend Antioch College, receiving his B.A. in 1951. He continued his education at the London School of Economics before receiving his Ph.D. from MIT in 1955. His focus was on Economics. He was a business professor at the University of Southern California. In 2007, BusinessWeek named him one of the top ten thought leaders in business. He has been married twice and has 4 children.

Bio Source: Wikipedia  Fig¹.  Photo by Lucas on Pexels  Fig².  Photo by bruce mars on Pexels

The Classic Pamela Positive: The “Big H”: The Unfailing Recipe For Happiness

 

“Serve others. The unfailing recipe for happiness and success is to want the good of others. Happiness and success is when I see others happy. Happiness is a shared thing.”

Archbishop Desmond Tutu

 

We search. We search for the “Big H,” happiness, all the time. 

 

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We try to find our right calling. Our right partner in life. The right home, city, school.  And yet…

Happiness is about sharing. 

 

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It’s about experiences, time, thoughts and caring for others — which are all spiritual. And I can’t imagine many people expressing their happiest times not in the presence of someone else. It’s being with others, and being with them in a meaningful way. We also know that it is not necessarily even doing something; it could just be sharing one another’s presence, with each other.

 


Archbishop Desmond Tutu is a Christian cleric known for his work for human rights. He grew up in Northwest South Africa and he was the only son in his family. He would later attend Johannesburg Bantu High School, where Tutu would thrive in academics and rugby. After high school, he became a teacher where he would meet his wife. Together, they would have two children– Trevor and Thandeka. He would later join the clergy to become an Anglican priest. Active in South Africa, he was an important opponent of apartheid. Other causes he has worked on include fighting AIDs, homophobia, tuberculosis, racism, and poverty. Nelson Mandela described him as “the voice of the voiceless.” Tutu received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1984, the Albert Schweitzer Prize for Humanitarianism in 1986, the Gandhi Peace Prize in 2005, and the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2009.

Bio Source: Wikipedia  Fig¹. Photo by saeed mhmdi on Unsplash  Fig². Photo by Helena Lopes on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “We Need Each Other” – Sue Monk Kidd

 

When a suffering is shared, its weight is divided; and when a joy is shared, the delight is multiplied. We need each other.

- Sue Monk Kidd

 

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Oh, the joy of those words!

We need each other!

What a balm to the heart… we have to help each other, help each other through each step of life, and to care.

How love, companionship, and togetherness keep us all together!    

Let’s Cherish It,

Pamela

 


Sue Monk Kidd is a writer, novelist, and memoirist. She grew up in the Southern United States and her hometown of Sylvester, Georgia influenced her first and best-known book The Secret Life of Bees. As a worldwide acclaimed author, her fictional works are concentrated on the oppositions and successes of women. Kidd is inspired by Henry David Thoreau, Kate Chopin, Thomas Merton, Martha Burke, and Carl Jung as role models. Kidd is married to Sanford “Sandy” Kidd. The couple has two children, Bob and Ann. She has lived in Charleston and Mt. Pleasant, South Carolina, Florida, and currently resides in North Carolina.

Bio Source: Wikipedia  Fig¹.  Photo by Ivana Cajina on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: Give Your Mom a Smile

 

I am very fortunate to have the most wonderful mother.

She is a devoted wife, a loving mother, a supreme grandmother, and beloved by all.

Mom and I often have our “catch-up time” on the family room couch, just to talk about life. We sit with our sweet labrador dog (at that time sleepy-sweet and ready to go to bed).

 

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It’s one of my favorite things to simply listen to and share with my mom. Often we go over positives, a funny incident, or something that needs praying.

My mom is incredibly understanding. She has a loving heart, a listening heart. Ever-present for her children and her family, it’s her number one call in life. And that’s despite being an amazing, successful musician. She has it all — but in a balanced way. I find it a model for myself and how I would like to live.

So I’ve got something I am working on that I can give to my mom. I’d like to Give My Mom a Smile.

 

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When people are very understanding we have a tendency to open up to them…they are compassionate, present and listening. Which means it’s an easy thing to do!

Families are beautiful in how they give to each other. They cheer you on and help you when you are down. There’s nothing wrong with that, as family should be there for us as we are for them. Still, I’d like to be thoughtful about sharing the challenges. 

Here’s the reason why. My mother has done so much for me, and I want to give her that gift back. And one of the best ways to do that, is to give her joy.

 

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Your mother loves you and wants the best for you. Moms are ready to help their children with anything they need and that includes a listening ear. But they also want you to be happy.

And they are happy when you are happy.

 

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So what can you do to increase your mom’s happiness?

The next time you have a challenge, could you approach it a different way? Why not find another source?

Could you…

…quiet your mind

…go to a movie

…get a massage

…take a nap

…reason through the positives

…pray

…meditate?

What could you do to rest your heart and come back to

Give Your Mom A Smile?

Our mothers have done so much for us. One way we can do something for them is to show them we are happy. Let’s work on this today, Give Your Mother A Smile.


Fig¹. Photo by Mitchell Griest on Unsplash  Fig². Photo by Nathan Anderson on Unsplash  Fig³. Photo by Bruno Nascimento on Unsplash  Fig⁴. Photo by Thiago Cerqueira on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: Give a Gift Every Day

 

Give a gift every day.

Send your friend’s birthday gift early.

See a gift that would be meaningful for someone you care about, and just buy it. Give it to them now.

Take the time to cook a meal for your partner or your roommate. Take the time to cook a meal for yourself.

Smile at a person walking down the street.

Smile at a homeless person and stop and learn their name. There is the gift of knowing someone. Of acknowledging you care.

Be kind to yourself.

 

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Get in bed early.

Say three gratefuls before you fall asleep.

Say three gratefuls when you wake up.

Believe today is special.

Take time at lunch to be grateful for three more things.

Pay the phone bill for your roommate.

Drop off banana bread for your neighbor.

Give a lot. Expect little.

Smile at yourself in the mirror.

Work hard and attain the gift of devotion to something you believe in.

Work and leave early and give yourself a gentle night off, nurturing yourself.

Stop and look at nature. Any part of nature. The expanse of the sky; drifting clouds; a vibrant flower.

Give yourself the gift of awareness of how precious and beautiful life is every day.


Fig¹.  Photo by Rob Laughter on Unsplash