Tag Archives: happiness

The Classic Pamela Positive: “The Best Way Out is Always Through” – Robert Frost

“The best way out is always through.”

– Robert Frost

 


 

Robert Frost (1874-1963) was a highly-regarded poet known for his depiction of rural life. He published his first poem in high school. He attended Harvard but did not graduate due to illness; he received an honorary degree from Harvard posthumously, as well as more than 40 other honorary degrees. Though Frost grew up in the city, he lived on farms later in his life. He was a professor at Amherst College, and at Middlebury College for 42 years. Some of his best-known poems include “The Road Not Taken,” “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening,” and “Nothing Gold Can Stay.”

This particular quote is from the poem “A Servant to Servants” (1914). Many of Frost’s poems explore the splendor of the outdoors. However, “A Servant to Servants” is a contrast to the typical Frostian nature poem. Its speaker is the wife of a hard-working farmer who feels trapped in her life that seems meaningless. She explains her monotonous daily routine. The poem is written in iambic pentameter, although it varies in meter with no apparent rhyme scheme. A constant symbol in this poem is nature representing freedom, but it is a freedom that the speaker cannot attain.

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: Do It Anyway

 

Do It Anyway

People are often unreasonable, irrational, and self-centered.
Forgive them anyway.

If you are kind, people may accuse you of selfish, ulterior motives.
Be kind anyway.

If you are successful, you will win some unfaithful friends and some genuine enemies.
Succeed anyway.

If you are honest and sincere, people may deceive you.
Be honest and sincere anyway.

 

 

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What you spend years creating, others could destroy overnight.
Create anyway.

If you find serenity and happiness, some may be jealous.
Be happy anyway.

The good you do today, will often be forgotten.
Do good anyway.

Give the best you have, and it will never be enough.
Give your best anyway.

In the final analysis, it is between you and God.  It was never between you and them anyway.

 


 

This poem is widely attributed to Mother Teresa, after it was found hanging on a wall in her home for children in Calcutta.  It is a revised version of “The Paradoxical Commandments,” written by Dr. Kent M. Keith.  You can read more about the story on our UniversalGiving blog, PhilanthroPost.

 

 

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: “A Good Time to Laugh Is Any Time You Can” – Linda Ellerbee

 

“A good time to laugh is any time you can”

– Linda Ellerbee

 

 

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Linda Ellerbee (born August 15, 1944) is an American journalist who is most known for several jobs at NBC News, including as a Washington, DC correspondent and host of the Nickelodeon network’s Nick News. Linda grew up in Texas, and attended Vanderbilt University, although she quit without graduating. At NBC, Ellerbee worked as a reporter on The Today Show. Her first anchor job was on the prime-time version of Weekend, with the sign-off phrase “And so it goes.” In 1987, Ellerbee and her life and business partner Rolfe Tessem left network news to start their own production company, producing programs including Nick News – a news program for children that received many awards. In 1992, Ellerbee was diagnosed with breast cancer and had a double mastectomy. Since then, Ellerbee spends much of her time speaking to groups about how she fought cancer and how women need to fight not only the disease and for better medical treatments of it, but to laugh in the face of cancer as well.

 

 

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: “All the Other Things We Think Make Us Happy Are Actually Just Ways of Getting More Family and Friends.”

 

“We are happy when we have family, we are happy when we have friends and almost all the other things we think make us happy are actually just ways of getting more family and friends.”

 

– Daniel Todd Gilbert, psychologist

 

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Let’s be grateful for all the happiness in our lives today. To truly cherish family, call a long-lost friend, or spend less time on work — and more time on someone.  

All the ‘someones’ in our lives are what give us joy. Appreciate!

Love,

Pamela

 


 

Daniel Todd Gilbert (born November 5, 1957) is Professor of Psychology at Harvard University. He is a social psychologist known for his research (with Timothy Wilson of the University of Virginia) on affective forecasting, with a special emphasis on cognitive biases such as the impact bias. Gilbert authored Stumbling on Happiness, which won the 2007 Royal Society Prizes for Science Books, adding to his list of numerous awards for his teaching and research.  A high school dropout at age 19, he aspired to be a science fiction writer but when a creative writing class he wanted to take was full he took up psychology instead at University of Colorado Denver and Princeton University.  He also wrote essays that appeared in The New York Times and TIME, among others, and penned short stories that were published in Amazing Stories, Isaac Asimov’s Science Fiction Magazine and many other magazines and anthologies. He is the co-writer and host of the NOVA television series “This Emotional Life.”  He and his wife Marilynn Oliphant live in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Bio source: Wikipedia: Daniel Gilbert (psychologist)

The Classic Pamela Positive: Downsize Your Dreams? Why You Might Be Happier

 

“Friends” and “Sex and the City” – have been eclipsed by novels about young women abandoning the bright lights and fast track for simpler lives, smaller towns, and more homespun fellas. Even daydreams, this seems to show, can be downsized.”

— John Yemma, Editor of the Christian Science Monitor

 

Should you downsize your dreams?

Yet what are our dreams? They are hope for happiness.

 

 

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Happiness, however, is not always in the big goal. The promotion, the marriage, the child, the award.  Happiness is in finding peace now in our situation.

 

Happiness is finding the right calling, not simply staying complacent in a job.  Happiness is also being grateful to have a job in this economy.  Happiness is being able to serve with excellence in a job.

 

Happiness is finding the right person, not just being married.  Happiness is finding the good in your marriage and focusing on that.

 

 

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Happiness is having a child. Happiness is also mentoring a child or adopting a child. Happiness is also having a childlike spirit.

 

Happiness is being recognized for an achievement well deserved. Happiness is being understated, humble, and quiet, knowing you have served well, without broadcasting it.

 

When we ‘downsize our dreams,’ we aren’t losing hope.  Or settling. We are saying to ourselves, I can find my dream of happiness right where I am.  I will also find it in the future, goal achieved or not.

 

 

Source quote: Vacation: Nothing Better

The Classic Pamela Positive: Money Can’t Buy Happiness

 

Money cant buy happiness.  Sometimes we forget this. Remember, it was the Beatles who brought this up through their songs. They had powerful messages which made us think. 

 

 

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So the next time you are enjoying one of their songs, remember, too, their life advice. Money cant buy happiness.

 

Strong relationships do. Working at something you love can bring it. Spending time with those you respect does. Adhering to your values does. Relationships, sincere work, people and values bring you happiness. 

 

 

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Focus on those four areas, and not only will you have happiness, but the money will come. Youll be doing what you love to do, and that will surely be compensated.

 

Do What You Love, Do It With Love,

Pamela

 

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Don’t Bunt. Aim out of the ballpark.” – David Ogilvy

 

“Don’t bunt. Aim out of the ballpark. Aim for the company of the immortals.”

David Ogilvy

 

This is a beautiful clear message, especially in honor of our quirky, beloved Giants, about a clear focus. A focus that aims for the best, drives for excellence, and holds the highest standards in mind. Mr. Ogilvy did that with his advertising firm, and so we can choose to aim out of the ballpark in our chosen endeavor, too.

 

*****

 

David Mackenzie Ogilvy (23 June 1911 21 July 1999) was an advertising executive, widely hailed as “The Father of Advertising,and the author of the book Ogilvy on Advertising, a general commentary on advertising. He was born in West Horsley, Surrey in England and his parents were Dorothy Blow Fairfield and Francis John Longley Ogilvy, the latter a classics scholar and a financial broker. David attended St Cyprian’s School, Eastbourne; Fettes College in Edinburgh; and Christ Church, Oxford.  While working as an AGA salesman he wrote The Theory and Practice of Selling the AGA Cooker, considered by Fortune magazine as the finest sales instruction manual written. The manual led to his next job as account executive at London advertising agency Mather & Crowther, run by his older brother Francis. After WWII and having worked as a chef, researcher, and farmer Ogilvy started his own advertising agency in New York called Ogilvy, Benson, and Mather, where David was its Chairman until he retired in 1973. In the 1980s he returned as Chairman of the companys India office, then as temporary Chairman of the agencys German office, and visited and represented the companys branches around the world.

Ogilvy married three times, the first two marriages ending in divorce: first to Melinda Street, where they had one child, David Fairfield Ogilvy; then to Anne Cabot; and later on, Herta Lans until his passing in 1999 at his home in Bonnes, France.  In 1967, he was made a Commander of the Order of British Empire (CBE), adding to his many honors and achievements. In his lifetime and onwards he established his advertising philosophys four basic principles: creative brilliance, research, actual results for clients, and professional discipline.  

Source: Wikipedia: David Olgivey (businessman)