Tag Archives: greatness

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Do Great Deeds with Little Means” -Russell Conwell

 

“Greatness consists in doing great deeds with little means in the accomplishment of vast purposes.

It consists in the private ranks of life, in helping one’s fellows, in benefiting one’s neighborhood, in blessing one’s own city and state.”

―Russell Conwell

 

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It’s that simple.

Give Something Today,

Pamela

 


Russell Conwell (February 15, 1843 – December 6, 1925) was an American Baptist minister, orator, philanthropist, lawyer, and writer. He is best remembered as the founder and first president of Temple University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and for his inspirational lecture Acres of Diamonds. The son of Massachusetts farmers, Conwell attended Yale University and after graduating enlisted in the Union Army during the American Civil War. He was ordained as a Baptist minister in 1880, and delivered his famous speech “Acres of Diamonds” over 6,000 times around the world. The central idea of the work is that one need not look elsewhere for opportunity, achievement, or fortune – the resources to achieve all good things are present in one’s own community. Conwell’s capacity to establish Temple University and his other civic projects largely derived from the income that he earned from the speech. The published version has been regarded as a classic of New Thought literature since the 1870s.

Bio Source: Wikipedia


Fig¹.  Photo by Nathan Lemon on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: What To Do When You Don’t Know What To Do Next

What To Do When You Don’t Know What To Do Next?
 
Have faith, then take another step. 

 

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That’s how life works and soon you’ll reach your destination. So start walking, believing, and doing today!
 
Love,
 
Pamela 
 
 

 


Citations:
Fig. 1: Photo by Clark Tibbs on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Do Great Deeds with Little Means” – Russell Conwell

 

“Greatness consists in doing great deeds with little means in the accomplishment of vast purposes.

It consists in the private ranks of life, in helping one’s fellows, in benefiting one’s neighborhood, in blessing one’s own city and state.”

– Russell Conwell

 

 

nathan-lemon-482951-unsplash (1).jpg

 

 

It’s that simple.

Give something today,
Pamela

 

 


 

 

Russell Conwell (February 15, 1843 – December 6, 1925) was an American Baptist minister, orator, philanthropist, lawyer, and writer. He is best remembered as the founder and first president of Temple University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and for his inspirational lecture Acres of Diamonds. The son of Massachusetts farmers, Conwell attended Yale University and after graduating enlisted in the Union Army during the American Civil War. He was ordained as a Baptist minister in 1880, and delivered his famous speech “Acres of Diamonds” over 6,000 times around the world. The central idea of the work is that one need not look elsewhere for opportunity, achievement, or fortune – the resources to achieve all good things are present in one’s own community. Conwell’s capacity to establish Temple University and his other civic projects largely derived from the income that he earned from the speech. The published version has been regarded as a classic of New Thought literature since the 1870s.

The Classic Pamela Positive: Say “Bless You” To A Stranger?

 

“Thought is not reality; yet it is through Thought that our realities are created.”

– Sydney Banks

 

So let’s talk about how you can create a reality of good!  Here’s what one of my days was like, and how we can create a greater, positive reality. We do this by how we act and think.

 

 

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I was in my WeWork coworking space tonight when someone behind me sneezed. I was in the midst of doing emails, so I said,

“Bless you!”

 

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Do you find yourself only saying bless you to people when they sneeze right in front of you? Do you only say it if it’s a friend?

 

 

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Why not extend the blessing to others? If we’re going to have that tradition, then go ahead and extend “Bless You” to a stranger.

And if we want to get extra points in being our greatest selves (even though there really is no point system), then you can say it silently to someone as you walk on your way to work. You can think it when you are buying something from the Walgreens checker on the counter. You can even wish it for the whole world.

 

 

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So let’s say “Bless you” to a stranger.

You don’t even have to say it to their face. It’s time to embrace the world, embrace people and send positive blessings of peace to everyone you pass.

 

 

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Now that’s a job in itself, a calling! Imagine trying to silently bless every person you pass on your way to work. It’s a lot to do, so perhaps just make “one a day” a goal.

 

It’s a great way to bless our world towards greater good.

 

Whoever Is Reading This, I’m Sending A Blessing,

Pamela

 

 

 

Citations:
Fig. 1: Photo by Helena Lopes on Unsplash
Fig. 2:Photo by Charles Koh on Unsplash
Fig. 3: Photo by Philipe Cavalcante on Unsplas
Fig. 4: Photo by Juliana Kozoski on Unsplash
Fig. 5: Photo by Darpan Dodiya on Unsplash

 

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: Wisdom, Philosophy, Greatness

 

“Keep me away from the wisdom which does not cry, the philosophy which does not laugh and the greatness which does not bow before children.”

— Kahlil Gibran

 

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What a beautiful quote from Kahlil Gibran, a philosopher and leader who was so conscious of living in tune with nature, our feelings and our sincerest intentions.

 

 

*****

 

 

Kahlil Gibran was born in Lebanon in 1883 and emigrated to the United States as a young man. When he came to the U.S., he started his art career, writing in both English and Arabic.  He is best known for his work of philosophical essays, “The Prophet”. “The Prophet” has never been out of print since its initial publication in 1923. Gibran studied at the Académie Julian art school from 1908-1910 in Paris, where he excelled especially in drawing and watercolor. He was raised in a Christian family, but also was heavily influenced by Islam. In Lebanon, he is known as a literary hero. He is the third best-selling poet in the world, after Shakespeare and Lao-Tzu–excellent company to be in!

The Classic Pamela Positive: “The Greatest Mind is Always the Simplest.” – Russell Conwell

Now, the greatest mind is always the simplest.
Did you ever see a really great man?
Great in the best and truest sense?
If so, you could walk right up to him and say:
“How are you, Jim? “

 

-Russell Conwell, “Acres of Diamonds”

 

That’s right. The most amazing people are warm and accessible to all. That’s because they know everyone has a beautiful gift to give, and no one is greater. The greatest gift is being open and loving.



*****

 

Russell Conwell (February 15, 1843 – December 6, 1925) was an American Baptist minister, orator, philanthropist, lawyer, and writer. He is best remembered as the founder and first president of Temple University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and for his inspirational lecture Acres of Diamonds. The son of Massachusetts farmers, Conwell attended Yale University and after graduating enlisted in the Union Army during the American Civil War. He was ordained as a Baptist minister in 1880, and delivered his famous speech “Acres of Diamonds” over 6,000 times around the world. The central idea of the work is that one need not look elsewhere for opportunity, achievement, or fortune – the resources to achieve all good things are present in one’s own community. Conwell’s capacity to establish Temple University and his other civic projects largely derived from the income that he earned from the speech. The published version has been regarded as a classic of New Thought literature since the 1870s.

The Classic Pamela Positive: What To Do When You Don’t Know What To Do Next

What To Do When You Don’t Know What To Do Next?
 
Have faith, then take another step. 

 

clark-tibbs-367075-unsplash

 

That’s how life works and soon you’ll reach your destination. So start walking, believing, and doing today!
 
Love,
 
Pamela 
 
 
Citations:
Fig. 1: Photo by Clark Tibbs on Unsplash