Tag Archives: graciousness

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Smile at A Stranger, and The Important Reason Why” – Juliana Margulies

 

“Walk down the street and smile at a stranger. He’ll smile at the next stranger passing by, and then the whole street is smiling. And no one knows why.” 

— Juliana Margulies

 

 

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I love this quote. The only reason why we need to smile… is simply to give joy. Give joy to ourselves and to others… it’s one of our main reasons for being. And while people may not know why you are smiling, they’ll soon find out. It makes the world go around with peacefulness, graciousness and loving kindness. That’s reason enough. 🙂

 


 

 

Juliana Margulies is an American actress who achieved success as a regular character on ER, for which she received an Emmy. She grew up in New York, the youngest daughter of Jewish immigrants. Her mother was a teacher and her father was a philosopher and Madison Avenue advertising executive. More recently, she took the lead role in The Good Wife, and has received a Golden Globe and two Screen Actors Guild awards. Margulies attended Sarah Lawrence College, where she appeared in a few college plays. In 2007, she married to Keith Lieberthal, and they have one young son together.

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Smile at A Stranger, and The Important Reason Why” – Juliana Margulies

 

“Walk down the street and smile at a stranger. He’ll smile at the next stranger passing by, and then the whole street is smiling. And no one knows why.” 

— Juliana Margulies

 

trung-thanh-598718-unsplash

 

I love this quote. The only reason why we need to smile… is simply to give joy. Give joy to ourselves and to others… it’s one of our main reasons for being. And while people may not know why you are smiling, they’ll soon find out. It makes the world go around with peacefulness, graciousness and loving kindness. That’s reason enough. 🙂

 

*****

 

Juliana Margulies is an American actress who achieved success as a regular character on ER, for which she received an Emmy. More recently, she took the lead role in The Good Wife, and has received a Golden Globe and two Screen Actors Guild awards. She grew up in New York, the youngest daughter of Jewish immigrants. Her mother was a teacher and her father was a philosophy and Madison Avenue advertising executive. Margulies attended Sarah Lawrence College, where she appeared in a few college plays. In 2007, she married to Keith Lieberthal, and they have one young son together.

A Little Gracious Way to Live Life

Even 50 years ago

I feel her sense of love and support
She was not just a yes-man
but she understood

I feel she’s always looking over my shoulder – –

     Would she approve of it, what I was doing in that moment

Yes, I think of my toasty bathroom
Boss always used to turn the furnace off at night… but now I keep the heat on and wake up to a toasty bathroom. A little gracious way to live life. And to work hard, I love that, too.

5/13/96 Oma on Mahetty, her mother.

Memo to CEOs: Apologize in Advance

We’re all leaders. And as leaders, people are watching our actions.  That’s why it’s good to ask ourselves: Am I clear in my direction? Am I kind in my communication? Do I live my life according to principle? Have I accepted the call to live a life of excellence?

Here are two guidelines to help us become – and stay – leaders of excellence:

1. You’re responsible not only for others, but also for ‘taking care of you.’ That means getting the sleep that you need; it means building the space in your day so that you actually have time to be patient. If you don’t, you’ll face pressure that might cause you to react in ways that are not the true you. As CEO, you want to be your best self at all times.

Sometimes, we don’t succeed.  As a leader, your most painful times are when you are not the person you want to be. Perhaps there is an unexpected pressure—a new partnership, a deadline, or a team member who needs extra help. Perhaps you don’t achieve all that you’d hoped to do that day. Perhaps you go home disappointed in yourself: I could have had a kinder tone; I could have slowed down to encourage that team member who needed more time or insight. That’s where we move to Point #2.

2. Learn to apologize quickly, even in advance. People are watching, absorbing your every move. Since we make mistakes, we need to apologize, and quickly. That’s where the graciousness of your team, and of you, come in. So, try to apologize when it is right to do so, and apologize in advance. 

Here’s an example: If you feel you don’t understand the situation, or haven’t seen all your emails, you might preface your comments by saying, “I apologize in advance if I don’t have the full information,” or “I apologize in advance if I’ve missed something,” or “I apologize in advance for moving quickly today. I appreciate your support.”

This is openness. It’s true, it’s real.

It’s compassionate all ways around. It sets your heart up to be a better leader, to be a humble leader, to be a listening leader. It sets appropriate expectations with your team. Your apology is asking them for their graciousness in advance.

Graciousness in advance—what a lovely concept we all deserve to experience.

I Know I Said CEOs Should Apologize…I Revise…They Should Apologize in Advance

Earlier, I wrote about how CEOs should apologize.  CEOs should apologize in advance.  How many days have there been when I’ve gone home at night so disappointed in myself; could I have had a kinder tone; could I not have slowed down a bit more to encourage that team member who needed a bit more time, a bit more advice, a bit more encouragement?

And so not only do I try to apologize when right to do so, but I also apologize in advance. Let your team know you need their support.

This is openness.  It’s true, it’s real, it’s compassionate. You should do this for your team… so at rare times, it’s all right to ask the team for their understanding as well.

There are days when I know I miss things. Or perhaps you are on a lower rung of the patience ladder that day.   So if I haven’t gotten through all my emails or voicemails, or feel I don’t have a strong understanding of the situation, I will often preface conversations with the team, “I apologize in advance if I don’t have the full information,” or “I apologize in advance if I’ve missed something,”  or “I apologize if I am moving very quickly today, and speaking very rapidly. I appreciate your support.”

It sets your heart up to be a better leader, to be a humble leader, to be a listening leader.  It sets up appropriate expectations with your team.  Your apology is asking them for their graciousness.  And everyone deserves that.