Tag Archives: future

The Classic Pamela Positive: “If There Is No Struggle, There Is No Progress.” – Frederick Douglass

 

 

“If there is no struggle, there is no progress.”

– Frederick Douglass

 

 

Frederick Douglass for Living and Giving

 

 

Thank goodness he struggled, persevered and progressed. It helped him, me and our entire world be fairer, more compassionate, and true in our relations with one another.

 

We all struggle. And we all face lovely times of hope and joy.  That joy is indeed waiting for you, which aids all mankind.

 

 


Frederick Douglass (1818-1895) was an American social reformer, orator, writer and statesman. After escaping slavery, Douglass helped lead the abolitionist movement, acquiring a distinguished repertoire of his oratory and writing against slavery. He proved the slaveholders’ argument wrong in their claim that slaves did not possess the intellectual capacity to be independent American citizens. Douglass participated as an impressive player in changing history: rather than quietly living the rest of his life as a free man after escaping slavery, he risked that attainment to speak out for freedom and better treatment for all African Americans.

Douglass and Anna had five children: Rosetta Douglass, Lewis Henry Douglass, Frederick Douglass Jr., Charles Remond Douglass, and Annie Douglass. Charles and Rosetta helped produce his newspapers. Anna Douglass remained a loyal supporter of her husband’s public work.

BioSource: Wikipedia

Citations:
Fig¹: The U.S. National Archives on flickr

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: “The Future Will Belong To the Nature-Smart…The More High-Tech We Become, the More Nature We Need.” – Richard Louv

 

“The future will belong to the nature-smart…The more high-tech we become, the more nature we need.”

– Richard Louv

 

 

road-21205_640

 

We email, text, tweet, and then buy on Amazon.  The Tribune Media Group recently reported we’re on the Web at over 5 hours each day.  In addition to that, we’re involved in technology almost every day.

Do we see Nature every day?

 

 

AbiesLasiocarpa_-WildFlowers-CoonCreekSummit-MountainCityRanger-DistrictOfHumboldt-ToiyabeNationalForest_July12-2013-small

 

 

Even if the nature immediately around you isn’t as beautiful as above, there is still so much glory. The sun, green grass, fresh air, a cool breeze, rain that refreshes all and cleans the earth.

 

 

A_view_of_clouds_and_sky5-small

 

 

Look up to the sky.

I remember as child, one of my favorite things was playing outdoors in my backyard. I’d be in the sandbox, gazing at the glorious California blue of the sky, and the tall, green trees for which “Palo Alto” was named.  The very tip tops seemed to frame in their own haphazard way, a fringe around the sky.  And seeing that medium dark green up next to a beautiful heaven blue, was  a bit of perfection.  It was peacefulness in my childhood.

So technology does seem to reign at times.   It’s what life has evolved to, and we shouldn’t stop it.  It allows us to stay in touch with people we love, and to get certain things done quicker.  Yet, we can take steps to ensure balance in our lives. Balance for engaging with the natural world just as much as we do with gadgets.

Join me in appreciating whatever nature is in front of you today,

Pamela

 

 


 

 

Richard Louv is a journalist and author of books about the connections amongst family, nature, and community.  He is the founding chairman of the Children & Nature Network, an organization that helps to connect today’s children and future generations to the natural world.  Louv is also Honorary Co-chairman of Canada’s national Children and Nature Alliance; a part of the board of directors of ecoAmerica and the editorial board of Ecopsychology. Previously, he was a columnist for The San Diego Union-Tribune and a columnist and member of the editorial advisory board for Parents magazine.  Louv’s accomplishments include the 2007 Cox Award for “sustained achievement in public service,” the highest honor of Clemson University.   In 2009, he earned the International Making Cities Livable Jane Jacobs Award.

Louv is married to Kathy Frederick Louv and the father of two sons, Jason and Matthew.  Although an author and journalist, Richard Louv has said about himself that “he would rather fish than write.”

Bio source: About Richard Louv

Statistic source: Tribune Media Group

“Many of Us Crucify Ourselves Between Two Thieves – Regret For the Past and Fear Of the Future.” – Fulton Oursler

 

“Many of us crucify ourselves between two thieves – regret for the past and fear of the future.”

– Fulton Oursler

 

 

cross-66700_640

 

 

 

What can you let go of today?

 

 


 

 

Charles Fulton Oursler (January 22, 1893 – May 24, 1952) was an American journalist, playwright, editor, and author of mysteries and detective fiction. He was raised in a devout Baptist family. His childhood passions of reading and stage magic led to crafting stories that combined magic and magicians. Notable works include “The Magician Detective,” Father Flanagan of Boy’s Town (later adapted into the 1938 movie Boys Town), and The Greatest Story Ever Told (adapted as the 1965 movie of the same name). Although he was raised in a devout Baptist family, Charlies declared himself an agnostic at age 15. He, his second wife Grace Perkins, and their family would eventually convert to Catholicism following a trip to the Holy Land. (Bio source: Wikipedia: Fulton Oursler, Quote source: Quotes on Fear and Other Profound Sayings)

The Classic Pamela Positive: “If There Is No Struggle, There Is No Progress.” – Frederick Douglass

 

“If there is no struggle, there is no progress.”

– Frederick Douglass

 

 

Frederick Douglass

 

 

Thank goodness he struggled, persevered and progressed. It helped him, me and our entire world be fairer, more compassionate, and true in our relations with one another.

 

We all struggle. And we all face lovely times of hope and joy.  That joy is indeed waiting for you, which aids all mankind.

 

*****

 

Frederick Douglass (1818-1895) was an American social reformer, orator, writer and statesman. After escaping slavery, Douglass helped lead the abolitionist movement, acquiring a distinguished repertoire of his oratory and writing against slavery. He proved the slaveholders’ argument wrong in their claim that slaves did not possess the intellectual capacity to be independent American citizens. Douglass participated as an impressive player in changing history: rather than quietly living the rest of his life as a free man after escaping slavery, he risked that attainment to speak out for freedom and better treatment for all African Americans.

Women Are Breaking Ground!

 

I’m so thrilled that there’s new statistics out supporting the growth of women. For example, the percentage of career positions held by women in our country is now above 50%.1

 

 

rawpixel-788595-unsplash (1).jpg

 

 

While we still have some progress to go, there are twenty-four women that are CEOs, leading Fortune 500 companies.2 Ten years ago, it was 12.3

 

 

female power (1).png

 

 

Let’s make sure we celebrate and continue to encourage the rise of women in our country and all across the world.

I am grateful for women, and Women rising,

Pamela

 

 

Citations:
1 “Employment Rates of College Graduates”, National Center for Education Statistics,  https://nces.ed.gov/fastfacts/display.asp?id=561
Warner, Judith and Corley, Danielle, “TheWomen’s Leadership Gap”, Center for American Progress, May 21 2017,https://www.americanprogress.org/issues/women/reports/2017/05/21/432758/womens-leadership-gap/
3 Wolfe, Lahle, “Women CEOs at Fortune 500 Companies”, June 30, 2018, https://www.thebalancecareers.com/a-decade-of-women-ceos-at-fortune-500-companies-3515967
Fig. 1: Photo by Rawpixel on Unsplash
Fig. 2: Kimothy Joy  on the Bulletin

The Classic Pamela Positive: “The Future Will Belong To the Nature-Smart…The More High-Tech We Become, the More Nature We Need.” – Richard Louv

road-21205_640

“The future will belong to the nature-smart…The more high-tech we become, the more nature we need.”

– Richard Louv

We email, text, tweet, and then buy on Amazon.  The Tribune Media Group recently reported we’re on the Web at over 5 hours each day.  In addition to that, we’re involved in technology almost every day.

Do we see Nature every day?

 

AbiesLasiocarpa_-WildFlowers-CoonCreekSummit-MountainCityRanger-DistrictOfHumboldt-ToiyabeNationalForest_July12-2013-small

 

Even if the nature immediately around you isn’t as beautiful as above, there is still so much glory. The sun, green grass, fresh air, a cool breeze, rain that refreshes all and cleans the earth.

 

A_view_of_clouds_and_sky5-small

 

Look up to the sky.

I remember as child, one of my favorite things was playing outdoors in my backyard. I’d be in the sandbox, gazing at the glorious California blue of the sky, and the tall, green trees for which “Palo Alto” was named.  The very tip tops seemed to frame in their own haphazard way, a fringe around the sky.  And seeing that medium dark green up next to a beautiful heaven blue, was  a bit of perfection.  It was peacefulness in my childhood.

So technology does seem to reign at times.   It’s what life has evolved to, and we shouldn’t stop it.  It allows us to stay in touch with people we love, and to get certain things done quicker.  Yet, we can take steps to ensure balance in our lives. Balance for engaging with the natural world just as much as we do with gadgets.

Join me in appreciating whatever nature is in front of you today,

Pamela

 

******

 

Richard Louv is a journalist and author of books about the connections amongst family, nature, and community.  He is the founding chairman of the Children & Nature Network, an organization that helps to connect today’s children and future generations to the natural world.  Louv is also Honorary Co-chairman of Canada’s national Children and Nature Alliance; a part of the board of directors of ecoAmerica and the editorial board of Ecopsychology. Previously, he was a columnist for The San Diego Union-Tribune and a columnist and member of the editorial advisory board for Parents magazine.  Louv’s accomplishments include the 2007 Cox Award for “sustained achievement in public service,” the highest honor of Clemson University.   In 2009, he earned the International Making Cities Livable Jane Jacobs Award.

Louv is married to Kathy Frederick Louv and the father of two sons, Jason and Matthew.  Although an author and journalist, Richard Louv has said about himself that “he would rather fish than write.”

Bio source: About Richard Louv

Statistic source: Tribune Media Group

“Many of Us Crucify Ourselves Between Two Thieves – Regret For the Past and Fear Of the Future.” – Fulton Oursler

cross-66700_640

“Many of us crucify ourselves between two thieves – regret for the past and fear of the future.” – Fulton Oursler

What can you let go of today? Continue reading