Tag Archives: failure

The Classic Pamela Positive: “We Were Born to Succeed, Not to Fail.” – Henry David Thoreau

 

“We were born to succeed, not to fail.”

– Henry David Thoreau

 

man sitting on mountain cliff facing white clouds rising one hand at golden hour

 

 

That is our life purpose. To follow our calling in our own specially designed way. And so we will succeed, because the measurement is solely on how you uniquely pursue your talents, goals and qualities. Everyone has a different picture of success, his or her own beautiful expression.

 

 

I Love Your Expression,

Pamela

 


Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) was an author, philosopher, poet, abolitionist, and naturalist. He grew up in Massachusetts, into the “modest New England family” of John Thoreau, a pencil maker, and Cynthia Dunbar. He had two older siblings, Helen and John Jr., and a younger sister, Sophia. Thoreau’s birthplace still exists on Virginia Road in Concord. He studied at Harvard College between 1833 and 1837.

After college, he opened a grammar school with his brother in Concord, Massachusetts. During this time, he met Ralph Waldo Emerson who introduced him to other writers and encouraged him to publish his thoughts. He is the author of Walden, which is a philosophical argument for simple living and preservation of natural environment.  He also had other important writings on natural history, environmentalism and civil disobedience.

Biosource: Wikipedia


Citation:
Fig¹.Photo by Ian Stauffer on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Thinking Of The Things In My life That Bring Me Pleasure Is A Peaceful And Positive Way To Start The Day.” – Warren Bennis

 

“Thinking of the things in my life that bring me pleasure is a peaceful and positive way to start the day — and a much better way to deal with a perceived failure than to ruminate on it. When you’re down, think of the things you have to look forward to. When you are no longer in the grip of the mishap, then you are ready to reflect on it….  After reflection, the learning of the past is known, and the solution of the experience — the course of action we must take as a result — becomes clear. ”

– Warren Bennis

 

 

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Warren Bennis was a pioneer in Leadership studies, writing numerous influential books on the subject, including Leaders and Leading For a Lifetime. He was raised in New Jersey and he enlisted in the U.S. Army in 1943. During his time in the U.S. Army, he received the Purple Heart and Bronze Star. After his time in the military, he went on to attend Antioch College, receiving his B.A. in 1951. He continued his education at the London School of Economics before receiving his PhD from MIT in 1955. His focus was in Economics. He was a business professor at the University of Southern California. In 2007, BusinessWeek named him one of the top ten thought leaders in business.

 

 

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: How Close You Are To Success?

“Many of life’s failures are people who did not realize how close they were to success when they gave up.”

-Thomas A. Edison

 

That’s a shocking statement.  How close you are to success….

You can do it…

You could do it…

You are ascending the mountain…

Image result for climbing a mountain

 

 

and you stop.

 

How close are you?  Connect with your true, heart-deep motivation.  Instead of focusing on blocks, frustration or being tired, you can focus on why you are doing what you do.

They Gave Up. They Didn’t Realize. They Were So Close!  Success was just there….. all what Edison tells us.

 

So what will you do today? Give up or cross over?  Give up or stand up? Give up or ascend? Continue on your pathway, and firmly but gently, success will lead you.

 

Thank you dear Thomas Edison, as we know you failed thousands of times. Yet your success still shines in our lives today.

 

 


 

 

Edison was born in 1847 in the canal town of Milan, Ohio. In 1859 Edison began working on a local branch of the Grand Trunk Railroad, selling newspapers, magazines, and candy. At one point he also conducted chemical experiments in a baggage-car laboratory.

 

 

Image result for thomas edison

 

 

In 1868 Edison became an independent inventor in Boston. Edison soon acquired a reputation as a first-rank inventor. In 1871, Edison married 16-year-old Mary Stilwell, whom he had met two months earlier. She was an employee at one of his shops.  They had three children. Mary Edison died at age 29 in 1884, of unknown causes.

 

While working on the telephone in the summer of 1877, Edison discovered a method of recording sound, and in the late fall he unveiled the phonograph. Finally, beginning in the fall of 1878, Edison devoted thirty months to developing a complete system of incandescent electric lighting.

In 1886, at the age of thirty-nine, Edison married the 20-year-old Mina Miller. They also had three children together. Edison generally preferred spending time in the laboratory to being with his family. By the time of his death on October 18, 1931, Edison had received 1,093 U.S. patents, a total still untouched by any other inventor. Even more important, he created a model for modern industrial research.

The Classic Pamela Positive: “We Were Born to Succeed, Not to Fail.” – Henry David Thoreau

 

“We were born to succeed, not to fail.”

– Henry David Thoreau

 

 

mountain-298999_640

 

That is our life purpose. To follow our calling in our own specially designed way. And so we will succeed, because the measurement is solely on how you uniquely pursue your talents, goals and qualities. Everyone has a different picture of success, his or her own beautiful expression.

 

I Love Your Expression,

Pamela

 

 


 

 

Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) was an author, philosopher, poet, abolitionist, and naturalist. He grew up in Massachusetts and he went on to attend Harvard College. After college, he opened a grammar school with his brother in Concord, Massachusetts. During this time, he met Ralph Waldo Emerson who introduced him to other writers and encouraged him to publish his thoughts. He is the author of Walden, which is a philosophical argument for simple living and preservation of natural environment.  He also had other important writings on natural history, environmentalism and civil disobedience.

The Pamela Positive: Thinking of the things in my life that bring me pleasure is a peaceful and positive way to start the day. – Warren Bennis

“Thinking of the things in my life that bring me pleasure is a peaceful and positive way to start the day — and a much better way to deal with a perceived failure than to ruminate on it.  When you’re down, think of the things you have to look forward to. When you are no longer in the grip of the mishap, then you are ready to reflect on it…  After reflection, the learning of the past is known, and the solution of the experience — the course of action we must take as a result — becomes clear. ”

— Warren Bennis

Warren Bennis is a pioneer in Leadership studies, writing numerous influential books on the subject, including Leaders and Leading For a Lifetime.  He is a business professor at the University of Southern California.  In 2007, BusinessWeek named him one of the top ten thought leaders in business.

The Classic Pamela Positive: Thinking of the Things in My Life That Bring Me Pleasure Is a Peaceful and Positive Way to Start the Day. – Warren Bennis

sunflower-450232_640“Thinking of the things in my life that bring me pleasure is a peaceful and positive way to start the day — and a much better way to deal with a perceived failure than to ruminate on it.  When you’re down, think of the things you have to look forward to. When you are no longer in the grip of the mishap, then you are ready to reflect on it…  After reflection, the learning of the past is known, and the solution of the experience — the course of action we must take as a result — becomes clear. ”

— Warren Bennis Continue reading

The Classic Pamela Positive: Thinking of the Things in My Life That Bring Me Pleasure Is a Peaceful and Positive Way to Start the Day. – Warren Bennis

“Thinking of the things in my life that bring me pleasure is a peaceful and positive way to start the day — and a much better way to deal with a perceived failure than to ruminate on it.  When you’re down, think of the things you have to look forward to. When you are no longer in the grip of the mishap, then you are ready to reflect on it…  After reflection, the learning of the past is known, and the solution of the experience — the course of action we must take as a result — becomes clear. ”

— Warren Bennis

Warren Bennis is a pioneer in Leadership studies, writing numerous influential books on the subject, including Leaders and Leading For a Lifetime.  He is a business professor at the University of Southern California.  In 2007, BusinessWeek named him one of the top ten thought leaders in business.