Tag Archives: conversations

Classic Pamela Positive: Communicate With More Than Words

A photo by Dogancan Ozturan. unsplash.com/photos/94taEmdowRw

It is so amazing to me that when we communicate, the words really ‘come in third place.’

What’s first and second? First is the tone. If we are abrasive, affrontive, sarcastic then it doesn’t open up the conversation and action for change. Calm, proactive, inclusive, even — “slow” — conversations help provide dynamic change. It sounds as if it is an oxymoron. But allowing the participants to breathe in the interaction helps bring about the best and most inclusive solutions for all parties.

Second then is body language and what we communicate; third come the words.

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Love for the Team

 

team-lunch

Yesterday, I brought in Chinese food for the UniversalGiving team. It was so nice to have the team together and to bond over good food and good conversation. I’m so grateful for all of the work that each and every team member does to contribute to our mission, our values, and our community.

Classic Pamela Positive: Communicate With More Than Words

A photo by Dogancan Ozturan. unsplash.com/photos/94taEmdowRw

It is so amazing to me that when we communicate, the words really ‘come in third place.’

What’s first and second? First is the tone. If we are abrasive, affrontive, sarcastic then it doesn’t open up the conversation and action for change. Calm, proactive, inclusive, even — “slow” — conversations help provide dynamic change. It sounds as if it is an oxymoron. But allowing the participants to breathe in the interaction helps bring about the best and most inclusive solutions for all parties.

Second then is body language and what we communicate; third come the words.

What Do You Talk About At a Cocktail Party? Top Recommendation: Take the European View

I recently saw this article on Fast Company, where I also blog, about top conversation starters — and I would say “keepers,” too. Celebrate the full person!

Hate Small Talk? These 5 Questions Will Help You Work Any Room” by Allison Graham

Here was my response:

Dear Allison,

What wonderful ideas! One way I look at it is to take a European View: Instead of talking about work, ask about what people are interested in. Often work for people is simply a job.

In America, we often use work as a “go-to” in our conversations. That’s not bad, as many of us are passionate about our work, or have been fortunate to find a calling.

Yet Europeans take a different view. They often enjoy life through a broader perspective: art, food, intellect, spending time together. Work is one component of life.

So instead I ask what people are interested in, what they love to do. People love to talk about this, and it may or may not involve work. They also appreciate being asked about themselves holistically as people.