Tag Archives: compassion

The Classic Pamela Positive: “If You Can’t Feed A Hundred People…” – Mother Teresa

“If you can’t feed a hundred people, feed just one.”

 

Mother Teresa

 

 

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Blessed Teresa of Calcutta (1910-1997), best known as Mother Teresa, was a Catholic nun known for her work caring for the poorest of the poor in the slums of India.  She was born in Albania, and joined the Sisters of Loreto as a missionary at the age of 18.  She became a nun in 1937, while teaching at a religious school in Calcutta.  She began her work with the poor in Calcutta in 1948.  In 1950, she founded the Missionaries of Charity, which presently has 4,500 sisters and is active in more than 100 countries.  Mother Teresa came to international attention with the 1969 documentary, Something Beautiful for God.  In 1979, she received the Nobel Peace Prize for her inspiring work with the poor.

The Classic Pamela Positive: Do It Anyway

 

Do It Anyway

People are often unreasonable, irrational, and self-centered.
Forgive them anyway.

If you are kind, people may accuse you of selfish, ulterior motives.
Be kind anyway.

If you are successful, you will win some unfaithful friends and some genuine enemies.
Succeed anyway.

If you are honest and sincere, people may deceive you.
Be honest and sincere anyway.

 

 

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What you spend years creating, others could destroy overnight.
Create anyway.

If you find serenity and happiness, some may be jealous.
Be happy anyway.

The good you do today, will often be forgotten.
Do good anyway.

Give the best you have, and it will never be enough.
Give your best anyway.

In the final analysis, it is between you and God.  It was never between you and them anyway.

 


 

This poem is widely attributed to Mother Teresa, after it was found hanging on a wall in her home for children in Calcutta.  It is a revised version of “The Paradoxical Commandments,” written by Dr. Kent M. Keith.  You can read more about the story on our UniversalGiving blog, PhilanthroPost.

 

 

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: “If There Is No Struggle, There Is No Progress.” – Frederick Douglass

 

“If there is no struggle, there is no progress.”

– Frederick Douglass

 

 

Frederick Douglass

 

 

Thank goodness he struggled, persevered and progressed. It helped him, me and our entire world be fairer, more compassionate, and true in our relations with one another.

 

We all struggle. And we all face lovely times of hope and joy.  That joy is indeed waiting for you, which aids all mankind.

 

*****

 

Frederick Douglass (1818-1895) was an American social reformer, orator, writer and statesman. After escaping slavery, Douglass helped lead the abolitionist movement, acquiring a distinguished repertoire of his oratory and writing against slavery. He proved the slaveholders’ argument wrong in their claim that slaves did not possess the intellectual capacity to be independent American citizens. Douglass participated as an impressive player in changing history: rather than quietly living the rest of his life as a free man after escaping slavery, he risked that attainment to speak out for freedom and better treatment for all African Americans.

The Classic Pamela Positive: Letting It All Go, Each Day – Le Don

Mentally, I sometimes Let It All Go, Each Day. I literally picture myself moving, and it impels action! You realize as your day unfolds how many things you have which you feel iffy about, or just ok. And that’s when they go in the give away bag.

 

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I actually have a giveaway bag now that has its own shelf with the label “Le Don.” That’s French for “The Gift.” So almost every week, I am giving something away, which I hope will be considered a gift eagerly used and appreciated by someone else.

I have found Letting It All Go helps others, and helps my home and heart become simpler, clearer…

It’s a gift in every sense of the word.

The Classic Pamela Positive: “I don’t think you ever stop giving.” —Oprah Winfrey

 

  “I don’t think you ever stop giving. I really don’t. I think it’s an on-going process. And it’s not just about being able to write a check. It’s being able to touch somebody’s life.” —Oprah Winfrey

 

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That’s what we are all here to do: Touch someone’s life today.  

Stop what you are doing, look up, and care about someone today. That might be the window washer, the barista at Peet’s, your mom, or the building manager.

 
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Everyone needs care, love, and attention. Touch someone’s life, right now.

How will you do it?

Touch a Life,

Pamela​

 

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Oprah Gail Winfrey was born on an isolated farm in Kosciusko, Mississippi, on January 29, 1954. Winfrey’s unmarried parents separated soon after she was born and left her in the care of her maternal grandmother on the farm. The poor, urban lifestyle had its negative effect on Winfrey as a young teenager. Winfrey said her father saved her life. He was very strict and provided her with guidance, structure, rules, and books. Winfrey became an excellent student.

Winfrey became Miss Black Nashville and Miss Tennessee. The Nashville Columbia Broadcasting System affiliate offered her a job; Winfrey turned it down twice, but finally took the advice of a speech teacher, who reminded her that job offers from CBS were “the reason people go to college.” Winfrey was Nashville’s first African American female co-anchor of the evening news. Her emotional ad-lib delivery eventually got her transferred to the daytime talk show arena, and after boosting a third-rated local Chicago talk show to first place, she launched her own production company and became internationally syndicated. By the mid-1990’s, she had reinvented her show with a focus on literature, self-improvement, and spirituality. Though criticized for unleashing a confession culture, promoting controversial self-help ideas, and an emotion-centered approach, she is often praised for overcoming adversity to become a benefactor to others.

Winfrey’s The Oprah Winfrey Show was hugely successful. It was broadcasted in 145 countries and had an average of 233,000 viewers in 2016. When her show first began, her audience was 55 percent larger than that of her closest competitors. Since its creation in 2000, O, The Oprah Magazine has become one of the most successful titles of the periodical press, its print run copies exceeding 2 million.

 

Photo credit: Pamela Littky for VARIETY

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: Do It Anyway

Do It Anyway

People are often unreasonable, irrational, and self-centered.
Forgive them anyway.

If you are kind, people may accuse you of selfish, ulterior motives.
Be kind anyway.

If you are successful, you will win some unfaithful friends and some genuine enemies.
Succeed anyway.

If you are honest and sincere, people may deceive you.
Be honest and sincere anyway.

What you spend years creating, others could destroy overnight.
Create anyway.

If you find serenity and happiness, some may be jealous.
Be happy anyway.

The good you do today, will often be forgotten.
Do good anyway.

Give the best you have, and it will never be enough.
Give your best anyway.

In the final analysis, it is between you and God.  It was never between you and them anyway.

This poem is widely attributed to Mother Teresa, after it was found hanging on a wall in her home for children in Calcutta.  It is a revised version of “The Paradoxical Commandments,” written by Dr. Kent M. Keith.  You can read more about the story on our UniversalGiving blog, PhilanthroPost.

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Death Is Nothing At All”

My beloved Oma was one of my best friends. And yet she is with me constantly. It’s not easy, it never will be, but it changes. I am learning to become more natural in my connection with her, even though I can’t see her. I can still feel her presence, I can still feel her love.

I spoke this from memory at her service, and I still love it to this day. Oma, I know you are “just around the corner.” I love you, Oma.

Death Is Nothing At All

Henry Scott Holland

Death is nothing at all.

I have only slipped away to the next room.

I am I and you are you.

Whatever we were to each other,

That, we still are.

Call me by my old familiar name.

Speak to me in the easy way

which you always used.

Put no difference into your tone.

Wear no forced air of solemnity or sorrow.

Laugh as we always laughed

at the little jokes we enjoyed together.

Play, smile, think of me. Pray for me.

Let my name be ever the household word

that it always was.

Let it be spoken without effect.

Without the trace of a shadow on it.

Life means all that it ever meant.

It is the same that it ever was.

There is absolute unbroken continuity.

Why should I be out of mind

because I am out of sight?

I am but waiting for you.

For an interval.

Somewhere. Very near.

Just around the corner.

All is well.

Henry Scott Holland (1847 – 1918) was Regius Professor of Divinity at Oxford, one of Oxford’s oldest and most prestigious seats. He was also canon at St. Paul’s Cathedral.