Tag Archives: community

Forced Innovation in the UK

An interesting article in The Economist spoke about governments that are forced into innovation.

Why?

They are running out of funds.

The UK has just instituted a budget cut: They need to find savings of nearly 40% across the government.

Services we have taken for granted — we will have to pay. “Life event services” such as recycling require a charge. Immigrants have to pay a £200 charge regarding the National Health Services program, whether they use it or not, upon entrance to the country. What’s most fascinating is looking at the courts. If you’re in a criminal court and you plead not guilty and then are convicted, you owe serious charges for the court time and the prosecutor fees. Divorce or taking up an issue with a tenant will cost you.

What about the luxury of driving? Many parking spaces are no longer free. And if you enter the busy downtown route in London, you pay a charge of about $15. This keeps congestion down, and public transportation up.

In part, it is trying to ensure that people stay honest; in part it simply makes them more grateful.

What do you think? Do you like the UK’s government’s new approach to services?

I appreciate very much that people are being innovative. We do need to be more creative.

We need to save the environment.

Hopetoun_falls

It makes us pause before we simply act– and sometimes rashly, out of anger, or hurt. You are paying emotionally, and with your wallet! …. could we handle this in a different way? A more personal way, using our emotional relationship building skills rather than the courts?

I like that it holds us accountable.

I always appreciate becoming humbler…it’s a deep soul penetrating sense of gratitude for every little thing….

30_Days_of_Gratitude-_Day_12_(5168765943)

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I also hope that it is not penalizing a sincere user of the service. Therefore:

Could for-profits create some services, and support new jobs with excellence in client service? We reduce a bloated government, provide greater efficiency, more jobs, more competitiveness in pricing and excellence in client service?

Could nonprofits support the deserving, documented requests and help the people most affected? Donors who contribute — pick the person and story they want to fund. It could also create a personal connection not existing now, contributing to a longterm relationship and support. That’s also a stronger, more bonded community.

Refugee_camp_in_Guinea

My view is that some of these government charges will be necessary. At the same time I hope that this will be an opportunity for our forprofit and philanthropic sectors to step up and provide.

I look forward to hearing your thoughts!

The Classic Pamela Positive: Celebrate True Wealth

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Wealth is a state of mind, and how we view it with gratitude. Yet we tend to associate wealth with money. But true wealth is in our relationships, the love we have and give, and the joy of each day.  Everyone can be a wealthy person, starting now, this moment.

I am often struck by this positive definition of wealth in my travel and volunteering in developing nations. Families spend time together. They gather food from the fields together, cook together and share meals. It’s all about togetherness. Further, marriages are usually for a lifetime and divorce rates are low.

If we don’t focus on family time, we lose our greatest asset in natural wealth: relationships. Relationships with ourselves, our families, and precious friends who have become like family.

This “living wealth” creates happy, balanced, productive, lower stress lifestyles, because we are connected in the way we are meant to be.

Be Wealthy Today.

With Love, Pamela

In a similar vein, poverty can be mental, emotional or spiritual.

The Pamela Positive: Divide and Rule… Unite and Lead

helping hands

This is a great quote from Johann Wolfgang von Goethe: “Divide and rule, a sound motto; unite and lead, a better one.”

At times need to separate into distinct groups in order to have harmony… but that’s short term. We are all most connected and most spiritually productive when we serve one another.

So if you need to divide and rule right now, you are taking a good step. One that provides clarity.   But in a close future, the habit will be one of uniting. Differences, disagreements will disappear, whether it is a misunderstanding with a neighbor, or the devastation in the Congo.

Let’s hold to this unity: It’s a better you, me, all of us.

—✶—

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749-1832) was a German poet, playwright, novelist, and natural philosopher, best known for his two-part poetic drama Faust, which he started around the age of twenty-three and didn’t finish till shortly before his death sixty years later. He is considered one of the greatest contributors of the German Romantic period. At the age of sixteen, in 1765, Goethe went to Leipzig University to study law as his father wished, though he also gained much recognition from the Rococo poems and lyric he wrote during this period. In 1766 he fell in love with Anne Catharina Schoenkopf (1746-1810) and wrote his joyfully exuberant collection of poems Annette.

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe now rests in the Fürstengruft or “Royal Tomb” in the “Historic Cemetery” in Wiemar where his dear friend Schiller is also laid to rest. In honour of these two famous German men of letters, a statue of Goethe and Schiller now stands at the German National Theatre in Munich. UNESCO’S “Memory of the World” list includes the handwritten works of Goethe preserved by the Goethe-Schiller-Archive.

Bio Source: The Literature Network

She Didn’t Need to Ask Him For Anything

I have a group called my “Spiritual Friends.”  These are people with great hearts!  So we love to share inspiration.

Last night I read a prolific mini-biography on Catherine of Genoa, from the 15th century.

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Her life was so different from the lives we live today.  She lived a very tough life, but, in the last part of her life — See how happy! How fulfilled!  How complete she is!   She is living and serving in Love. Her life is so complete, because she is fully loving.

So let’s learn from her and from her life… Here’s her brief story.


Catherine came from the prominent Italian Fieschi family. She originally wanted to join the convent.  Upon the death of her father at age 16, Catherine married a wealthy trader. He was also from prestige, having been connected to two Popes in his family.

It was not a happy union. He treated her most unkindly with a violent temper and relentless spending.  At times, she was distracted from her original spiritual devotion to God.

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At one point in a church, she became so humbled and had a vision of conversion.  She became in constant union with God.  It was back to her original vision of wanting to be in a convent, in a way; she was tireless, obedient, loving. She became a mystic and saint, ministering to the poor with utmost servitude.

It was said about her: “Her love for God was matched only by her love for others.”

As you see below, she was so close to God — she didn’t need to ask him for anything. 


“May this be our prayer: “I do not want to turn my eyes from you O God.   There I want them to stay and not move no matter what happens to me, within or without.”

For those who trust in God need not worry about themselves. As I think about you, my spiritual children, I see that God’s pure love is attentive to all your needs. It is because of his tender love I need not ask anything of God for you.”  -Catherine of Genoa

Catherine of Genoa

Life’s and Teachings
1447–1510
“Her love for God was matched only by her love for others”
Bio: Catherine of Genoa was born in Genoa in 1447. Following an unhappy and abusive marriage, she was converted to Catholicism during a confession. Catherine of Genoa became a saint recognized for her work among the sick and the poor.

The New Luxury – Water

In many emerging nations, children are starving and dying due to lack of clean water.  As a “developed” nation, it certainly doesn’t seem that advanced for us to be getting water for free.   Meanwhile, two million people in the developing world are dying every year because they can’t access clean water.

Maybe we won’t have water fountains in the future.

It doesn’t make sense.   If there is a limited, precious resource, why should it flow freely to those who have the most access to it? And at the same time, be so costly to others who need it most?

I think we should have to buy our water, bottled or fountain.  It’s a cherished, expensive and rare commodity. Quite soon, and even by certain nations, water already is the new diamond.

The diamonds which are jewels are high end commodities, which are optional.  Yet water is not a “high-end commodity” that we can go without.

Our society is now realizing that the most prized and honored possessions in our world are things that we actually cannot possess…  Water is used, captured again, recycled in nature, and used again.  Unlike diamonds, it can’t fit in our jewelry box, where we take it out whenever we so desire.  Its beauty rests in its necessary part of our day to day.

Its beauty rests in the continuation of life.

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Let’s do all we can today to conserve water or donate to make water available for someone else.

To Live In This World, You Must Be Able to Do Three Things

To live in this world, you must be able to do three things:

Look, the trees
are turning
their own bodies
into pillars

of light,
are giving off the rich
fragrance of cinnamon
and fulfillment,

the long tapers
of cattails
are bursting and floating away over
the blue shoulders

of the ponds,
and every pond,
no matter what its
name is, is

nameless now.
Every year
everything
I have ever learned

in my lifetime
leads back to this: the fires
and the black river of loss
whose other side

is salvation,
whose meaning
none of us will ever know.
To live in this world

you must be able
to do three things:
to love what is mortal;
to hold it

against your bones knowing
your own life depends on it;
and, when the time comes to let it
go,
to let it go.

-Mary Oliver, In Blackwater Woods

blackwater

This is an excerpt from a beautiful poem by Mary Oliver. She is so very real about what we must hold to in life. And that powerful concept is love.

Love comes above all profession, all professional achievements, medals or victories.   We love, simply, what make our heart soar… and that often is our mom, a cherished pet, a sunny day, a walk in Yosemite park, or simply a day that is well lived, and goes smoothly.  We love and hold to these treasured experiences.

The only change I would make is that what we hold to really isn’t mortal.  Instead, we hold to those spiritual qualities that are about love, appreciation, kindness, care. Those aren’t contained in a body, to one person, or even seeable with our eyes.

It is what our heart knows. So stay with what your heart knows, and you will live a  life filled with peace and love.

Have a Good Evening,

Pamela

The Classic Pamela Positive: “A Selfless Person Is More Concerned About the Happiness of Another…”

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“A selfless person is one who is more concerned about the happiness and well-being of another than about his or her own convenience or comfort, one who is willing to serve another when it is neither sought for nor appreciated, or one who is willing to serve even those whom he or she dislikes. A selfless person displays a willingness to sacrifice, a willingness to purge from his or her mind and heart personal wants, and needs, and feelings. Instead of reaching for and requiring praise and recognition for himself, or gratification of his or her own wants, the selfless person will meet these very human needs for others. ”

–H. Burke Peterson

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H. Burke Peterson is an authority in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, and the author of “A Glimpse of Glory”.  In World War II, he fought with the American Navy in the Pacific theatre.  He has been married to Brookie Carden since 1947, and they have five daughters.