Tag Archives: community

The Pamela Positive: “Make a Gift of One’s Life”

“One makes a gift of one’s life and endeavors by sanctifying it with love, and devotion and selfless service. When seeking to uplift others, we are uplifted in the process. Every kind thought or smile therefore benefits oneself as well as all the world.” –David Hawkins

Dr. David Hawkins is a psychiatrist and spiritual teacher, and the author of a number of books about spirituality and consciousness.

The Pamela Positive: “Tough Times Never Last, But Tough People Do.” – Dr. Robert Schuller

“Tough times never last, but tough people do.” – Dr. Robert Schuller

And the point here is not be tough… but to persevere.  To last through the valley.  To endure, cultivate patience, and live humility.  With that, we develop our character which allows us to serve our world and neighbors more effectively.

So we encourage you to last… so you can live more fully.

Dr. Robert Schuller is a minister and founder of the Crystal Cathedral in Garden Grove, California.  He is best known for starting the popular TV program Hour of Power; as a result he became a popular Televangelist. Recently he retired as the principle pastor of the Crystal Cathedral and became the chairman of the church’s board of directors.

We’re Going in Different Directions: No, We’re Not

One morning as I was leaving for work, my mom and I had a very special interchange.

We live in Menlo Park, and I was headed north to San Francisco.  My parents were headed south to Carmel for a bit of rest.  “Have a great day, Mom!  Thank you for having me… and now we’re going in different directions!”

“No, we’re not,” she said immediately.

I knew exactly what she meant.  Our minds and hearts are going in the same direction. She’s taught me to be loving and kind. To follow my heart, and to do what I love to do. And to live rightly. And that is what she does with her life.  She is so consistently, joyously serving others.  I’ve never seen a better model of this.

And so, as we parted that morning, we went in the same direction.

The Pamela Positive: “I want the whole person.” – D. J. DePree, founder of Herman Miller

“Henry Ford said, ‘bring us your hands, and you can leave everything else at home.’  D.J. rejected that idea and said completely the opposite: ‘I want all of you here.  I want the whole person.'”

 – J. Kermit Campbell, Former CEO of Herman Miller

 

Campbell continues, “If I can have 5,000 or 6,000 people who are passionate about what they do…solving problems and finding solutions to our customers’ problems, I’m going to be much better off than if I leave that to 10% of that population, who tell the other people what to do.  It’s like a sports team: you can have one or two guys who play well, but if you can get 50 guys on a team all playing at a very high level, you’re very tough to beat.  That’s always been our philosophy.”

D. J. DePree (1891–1990) began work as a clerk for the Michigan Star Furniture Company.  In 1914 he married Nellie Miller; they had seven children.  In 1923, D. J. bought the Michigan Star Furniture Company with help from a loan from his father-in-law.  D. J. renamed the company “Herman Miller” in his honor.  D. J. was CEO until 1961; after he stepped down, his two sons took over management of the company.  D. J. was also lay pastor of Ventura Baptist Church for eleven years.

The Pamela Positive: Every Problem…

“Every problem becomes a stimulus to wake up.”

– John Robinson

John Robinson is a retired psychologist who has written books and articles about psychology, spirituality, and the topic of finding Heaven on Earth.  His recent books include Finding Heaven Here.

The Pamela Positive: “Love Many, Trust a Few, And Always Paddle Your Own Canoe.”

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“Love Many, Trust a Few, And Always Paddle Your Own Canoe”
–Terri, from Coudersport, PA, as seen on Dark Chocolate Dove Wrapper

Terri has it right.  What a joy to enjoy dark chocolate, which I love, with a truly inspired quote.

Life affords us so many ways to love, and how important it is that we keep doing so.  At the same time, we have to be careful, and so Trust, or entrusting ourselves to others, perhaps must be a bit more rare.  I wish it weren’t so…however, everyone is on their pathway of personal growth.  So we must honor them, and honor ourselves: We should always love, but not necessarily entrust to others.

As far as paddling one’s own canoe.  As my Oma says, “You’d better put a little elbow grease into that.”  She was always ensuring she had pulled her weight. In fact, when I went over to Oma’s for a sleepover as a young child, even at the age of 8 or 9, our fun together — was working together.   We scrubbed the kitchen floor on hands and knees, sharpened pencils, and wrote up a list for the freezer so she knew what was in there.  She taught me to care about being clean, ordered and organized, which made her home special.  She made it fun. I loved working with my Oma.

Terri, we thank you for a quote which has delighted us all!

The Pamela Positive: Keep Your Balance

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I think one key point in life is to maintain balance–balance between time for work, time for loved ones, time for oneself, time for interests outside of one’s business. It’s so important to keep that balance, or we’ll simply burn-out.

I remember once when I was young in my career, and meeting with a fairly older, single woman. She was a successful venture capitalist. But I don’t know that I would consider her life successful. She traveled the world incessantly and was on every important board. But she seemed tired and joy was scarce. She told me to “Pack it all in.”

I didn’t. I kept my balance. I started a nonprofit and I did creative improv. I took care of my very young nephews and nieces. I loved life and I loved the people in my life.

We need to be renewed. We need to feel honored as whole, functioning people with families, outside interests, balanced lives, as well as our commitment to achieving the goals and vision of the organizations we run. The beauty of this balance is that I come back energized to UniversalGiving. My mind has had “time off” and is thrilled to re-engage with our efforts to serve. I look at challenges in a new light. My energy is renewed. I bring new skills to the table; my thoughts are stronger and more helpful. It’s better for me–and for my organization.