Tag Archives: communication

“Coming Together Is A Beginning; Keep Together Is Progress; Working Together Is Success.” – Henry Ford

“Coming together is a beginning; keep together is progress; working together is success.”

– Henry Ford

When I read that, my heart sighs in relief. That’s just a description of healthy management or a positive marriage. And what a joy it is when we have it! A team that works together with ease, with joy.  This certainly isn’t just about manufacturing or cars!

We all know that synergy…. it’s that feeling that people are communicating seamlessly. You might know what each other is going to say. Perhaps you instinctively know best how to split activities and responsibilities, respecting the unique talents of each.

Most importantly, you share. You share thoughts, ideas, insights, work and wisdom.

May we come together in peace. Keep together by excellence in communication, building a sure foundation. And work together towards success, where both parties feels supported, triumphant, and….loved. Marriage, Management, Meeting, No Matter What — that’s the feeling we strive for.

Successful Communication and Execution Through Love.

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Henry Ford (July 30, 1863 – April 7, 1947) was an American industrialist, the founder of the Ford Motor Company, and sponsor of the development of the assembly line technique of mass production.  Ford married Clara Ala Bryant (1866–1950) in 1888 and supported himself by farming and running a sawmill. Ford did not invent the automobile, but he developed and manufactured the Model T, the first automobile that many middle class Americans could afford to buy and revolutionized transportation and American industry. As owner of the Ford Motor Company, he became one of the richest and best-known people in the world. He is credited with “Fordism”: mass production of inexpensive goods coupled with high wages for workers. Ford had a global vision and his intense commitment to systematically lowering costs resulted in many technical and business innovations. (Bio source: Wikipedia: Henry Ford)

Classic Pamela Positive: Communicate With More Than Words

A photo by Dogancan Ozturan. unsplash.com/photos/94taEmdowRw

It is so amazing to me that when we communicate, the words really ‘come in third place.’

What’s first and second? First is the tone. If we are abrasive, affrontive, sarcastic then it doesn’t open up the conversation and action for change. Calm, proactive, inclusive, even — “slow” — conversations help provide dynamic change. It sounds as if it is an oxymoron. But allowing the participants to breathe in the interaction helps bring about the best and most inclusive solutions for all parties.

Second then is body language and what we communicate; third come the words.

“Coming Together Is A Beginning; Keep Together Is Progress; Working Together Is Success.” – Henry Ford

automobiles-502135_640“Coming together is a beginning; keep together is progress; working together is success.”

– Henry Ford

When I read that, my heart sighs in relief. That’s just a description of healthy management or a positive marriage. And what a joy it is when we have it!    A team that works together with ease, with joy.  This certainly isn’t just about manufacturing or cars!

We all know that synergy…. it’s that feeling that people are communicating seamlessly. You might know what each other is going to say. Perhaps you instinctively know best how to split activities and responsibilities, respecting the unique talents of each.

Most importantly, you share. You share thoughts, ideas, insights, work and wisdom.

May we come together in peace. Keep together by excellence in communication, building a sure foundation. And work together towards success, where both parties feels supported, triumphant, and….loved. Marriage, Management, Meeting, No Matter What — that’s the feeling we strive for.

Successful Communication and Execution Through Love.

___

Henry Ford (July 30, 1863 – April 7, 1947) was an American industrialist, the founder of the Ford Motor Company, and sponsor of the development of the assembly line technique of mass production.  Ford married Clara Ala Bryant (1866–1950) in 1888 and supported himself by farming and running a sawmill. Ford did not invent the automobile, but he developed and manufactured the Model T, the first automobile that many middle class Americans could afford to buy and revolutionized transportation and American industry. As owner of the Ford Motor Company, he became one of the richest and best-known people in the world. He is credited with “Fordism”: mass production of inexpensive goods coupled with high wages for workers. Ford had a global vision and his intense commitment to systematically lowering costs resulted in many technical and business innovations. (Bio source: Wikipedia: Henry Ford)

One-on-One

Last week, I was at Duke University speaking to students and professors about Social Entrepreneurship and promoting Dear Pamela. Here is a thank you email I received from an inspired student and aspiring social innovator. At UniversalGiving, we always try to keep the one-on-one communication.

Krystelle really wanted to meet in person. She was so kind to come to the hotel before I left for the flight.  We had the most heartfelt conversation, and in French because she’s from Haiti!

Take the time for one-on-one.   Let’s be there for people.

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Dear Ms. Pamela Hawley,

My name is Krystelle and today I heard you speak in Matt Nash’s social innovation class. I was captivated right away by your advice and genuinely enthusiastic presence and felt compelled to reach out to you – first to thank you for being such a strong force and role model as a woman accomplishing great things who in a matter of minutes made another young woman with big aspirations feel like anything is possible with the right mindset and plan. 

I also would like to ask if you would be willing to meet for a chat. I feel like I would be able to learn so much from hearing more about your journey as a social entrepreneur. I’m a senior at Duke this year and my heart is set on being a social entrepreneur. I would love to be able to talk to you about how you made it as I prepare myself to make the same kind of impact.

Thank you for speaking today and for inspiring me! I hope to meet with you soon.

Warmly,

Krystelle

How Do You De-stress?

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To answer the question “How do you de-stress?”, I’m going to use an excerpt from my soon-to-be-published Forbes article (I’ll post the full article when it’s out). When thinking about mindfulness and de-stressing techniques, I always turn to improv (the picture above is of me and Dave Collins performing for our show “Jackson Soup”). Happy reading!

 

“In my case, I adore improv. I find it thrilling to explore different characters, and be someone I’ve never been, nor ever will be, in real life. It also increases my listening skills and allows me to connect with others on stage. This helps me be a better and diverse communicator at work, adjusting to different people’s styles. On the stage, you have to react, to make a decision. Similarly, if you want to be CEO, you’ll have to improvise and respond under pressure. Improv requires individuals to collaborate with one another, to let go of their judgment, and to become better listeners.”

Why You Can’t Take Your Freedom to Think, and Freedom to Speak, for Granted

I love our famous Social Media Guru Beth Kanter. Below is great excerpt on how to attain Internet access, from what she and her colleagues learned from all over the world.

*****

May people who need a voice have one.

May people who desire freedom attain it.

May people who simply want to express an idea be able to do so.

We shouldn’t ever take our freedom to think, and our freedom to speak, for granted.

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Read on to get your freedom, or support someone who needs it. In this piece from 4 years ago, Beth Kanter relates how she faced Internet blockage during a Social Media training center in the Middle East:

“Unfortunately, yesterday, the Pakistan government decided to block Twitter – after we had just gotten everyone comfortable tweeting!

According to Pakistan’s Express Tribune, the request to block the site was made by the Ministry of Information and Technology, because of a drawing competition (details here). The ministry asked Twitter to remove the content, but Twitter responded that it “cannot stop any individual doing anything of this nature on the website.” Directives to block the site were sent to ISPs in several parts of the country, including PTCL Broadband and Wi-Tribe. It also reports that Twitter is still accessible by mobile using secure browsers like Opera, as well as proxies and VPNs. More from GlobalVoices.

The coverage in TechCrunch came about when activists in Pakistan wrote to major social media sites about the block. Waqas Ali, who is Lahore, sent TechCrunch a screenshot of the blocked Twitter. According to TechCrunch, Ali has also played a role in a past campaign in the country to keep Facebook from getting banned.

The block did not last long. According to Pakistan’s Express Tribune, the Prime Minister Yousaf Raza Gilani made the decision to restore access to Twitter.   

My colleague, Stephanie Rudat, who is working with me on the project, and I decided that we needed to “How To Get Past Internet Censorship” review. Stephanie put together this awesome resource list of services.”

*****

Beth, thank you for an inspiring and practical way to help others… and to being responsive! I bet the entire world thanks you.

Biography of Beth Kanter

(from bethkanter.org)

Beth Kanter is the author of Beth’s Blog: How Nonprofits Can Use Social Media, one of the longest running and most popular blogs for nonprofits.  She co-authored the book titled “The Networked Nonprofit” with Allison Fine published by J Wiley in 2010 that received Honorable Mention for the Terry McAdams Award.  Beth has over 30 years working in the nonprofit sector in technology, training, capacity building, evaluation, fundraising, and marketing.   Her second book, Measuring the Networked Nonprofit,  with Co-Author KD Paine, will be published in October, 2012.

In 2009, she was named by Fast Company Magazine as one of the most influential women in technology and one of Business Week’s “Voices of Innovation for Social Media.”  She was named Visiting Scholar for Social Media and Nonprofits for the David and Lucile Packard Foundation in 2009-2012.  She was a Society of New Communications Research Fellow for 2010.

Beth was honored with the inaugural PepsiCo Women’s Inspiration Award at the 2011 SxSW Interactive Festival.

“Swearing doesn’t make your argument valid…” ~ Shannon L. Alder

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“Swearing doesn’t make your argument valid; it just tells the other person you have lost your class and control.”

– Shannon L. Alder

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