Tag Archives: children

The Classic Pamela Positive: How You Can Give Back To A Youth- Without Money

 

mm-tey-676919-unsplash.jpg

 

Do you know what some of the greatest needs of our youth today are?

Love.

Trust.

Safety.

Kindness.

 

sue-zeng-531514-unsplash (1).jpg

 

So many of our youth need tangible, practical support.

Here are three key areas:

1. Emotional Support

That’s having someone who’s there to listen and to support you with whatever you are feeling, or facing.

2. Inspirational Support

This means that you are encouraging them to live their best lives and showing they can take a step forward, they can make a difference in their lives. Eventually, you want it to be not just about them, but about the future world that they’ll help create.

 

rhondak-native-florida-folk-artist-83553-unsplash (1).jpg

 

3. High Level Support

These are conversations that help youth understand how the world works and how they can impact the world. This makes them feel like their day-to-day and the world is “navigable”. How in a job they can support their future family. How they can march for freedom. How there is Temporary Assistance for Needy Families to help them get food and day-to-day support.

4. High-Level Attention

Many kids have been neglected. They might have been left on the streets. Or they might have parents who don’t have time for them, or don’t wish to spend time.

So how is it, exactly, that you can help? With your committed, High-Level Attention. Here some of the qualities that you can embody with any youth you encounter.

 

Be nurturing.

Provide friendship.

Give them some love.

Express compassion.

Be empathetic.

Affirm every good decision and every good word they speak.   

Help be a model for caring relationships, by caring for them.

 

jeffrey-lin-714756-unsplash (1).jpg

 

    5. Recognize Any Accomplishment

During your time with them, you can identify their strengths and I would repeat it often. Remember, they missed out on needed, life-giving encouragement.   Everyone needs to hear that they’re good at something and often.

Recognize them for any accomplishment.

 

jason-leung-479251-unsplash (1).jpg

 

Celebrate their accomplishments, and often. Bring it up again and again. You’re essentially saying: I see you

I See You Too,

Pamela

 


Fig¹.  Photo by Mm Teng on Unsplash  Fig².  Photo by Sue Zeng on Unsplash  Fig³.  Photo by RhondaK on Unsplash  Fig⁴.  Photo by Jeffrey Lin on Unsplash  Fig⁵.  Photo by Jason Leung on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: Sit Down At The Table

 

“…they’ve done studies on children who are required to sit down at the family table and those who are not.  And the ones who are score higher academically; they’re more well adjusted.”

― Paula Deen

 

three people having a toast on table

 

Sit down, be present, share. It’s not just about community, about family… but also about being the best we can be. Sitting down at the table with your loved ones for a mealtime shares love, and, helps you reach your goals!

Paula Deen did just that… she made ‘sitting down’ at the table with loved ones a life calling.  She does that fulltime, preparing lovely meals, and allowing us to enjoy and make them as well.

 

Sharing Cherry Tomatoes

 

So take some time to sit with your family, friends, or loved ones.. be supported…be nourished.. and be your best self. Thank you to Paula Deen who lives it daily.

Sitting With My Family,

Pamela


Paula Deen was born Paula Hiers in Albany, Georgia, the daughter of Corrie A. (née Paul) and Earl Wayne Hiers, Sr. Her parents died before she was 23, and an early marriage ended in divorce. In her 20s, Deen suffered from panic attacks and agoraphobia. She then focused on cooking for her family as something she could do without leaving her house.

Her grandmother Irene Paul had taught her the hand-me-down art of Southern cooking; one of the only places she felt safe was at her own stove, making thousands of pots of chicken and dumplings.  She later moved to Savannah, Georgia, with her sons.  Paula had many different jobs and roles, learning what she loved to do.  She tried hanging wallpaper, working as a bank teller, selling real estate and insurance. She then started a catering service,  making sandwiches and meals, which her sons Jamie and Bobby delivered. She then found her calling.

BioSource: Wikipedia  Fig¹. Pablo Merchán Montes on Unsplash  Fig². Photo by fauxels on Pexels

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Better To Make a Few Mistakes Being Natural” – Dr. Benjamin Spock

 

“Better to make a few mistakes being natural than to do everything out of a feeling of worry.”

— Dr. Benjamin Spock

 

girl wearing pink camisole on brown plant during daytime

 

It’s better to make a few mistakes being natural.  It’s important to be who we are in a natural, real way.  If we get everything right, and are absolutely perfect, but it’s done with anxiety…. then it actually isn’t right, is it?

What we do needs to be done with care, love, calm.  With joy and sincerity…and since Dr. Benjamin Spock was a famous leader in parenting in the 40s, I’ll take his advice not only for parenting, but also for management.  And for our communications, how we live our lives, how we treat others…


Dr. Spock was an influential writer on childrearing, who advocated for increased flexibility and affection in the treatment of infants and children. He was a pediatrician and his book entitled Baby and Childcare is one of the best selling books in history. Aside from that work, he also published 12 other books. He was an activist, involved in the anti-war movements in the 1960s and 1970s. While at Yale University, he became an Olympic gold medalist in rowing. He married Jane Cheney and they had two children together.

Bio Source: Wikipedia  Fig¹. Photo by Steve Halama on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: How You Can Give Back To A Youth- Without Money

 

mm-tey-676919-unsplash.jpg

 

Do you know what some of the greatest needs of our youth today are?

Love.

Trust.

Safety.

Kindness.

 

sue-zeng-531514-unsplash (1).jpg

 

So many of our youth need tangible, practical support.

Here are three key areas:

1. Emotional Support

That’s having someone who’s there to listen and to support you with whatever you are feeling, or facing.

2. Inspirational Support

This means that you are encouraging them to live their best lives and showing they can take a step forward, they can make a difference in their lives. Eventually, you want it to be not just about them, but about the future world that they’ll help create.

 

rhondak-native-florida-folk-artist-83553-unsplash (1).jpg

 

3. High Level Support

These are conversations that help youth understand how the world works and how they can impact the world. This makes them feel like their day-to-day and the world is “navigable”. How in a job they can support their future family. How they can march for freedom. How there is Temporary Assistance for Needy Families to help them get food and day-to-day support.

4. High-Level Attention

Many kids have been neglected. They might have been left on the streets. Or they might have parents who don’t have time for them, or don’t wish to spend time.

So how is it, exactly, that you can help? With your committed, High-Level Attention. Here some of the qualities that you can embody with any youth you encounter.

 

Be nurturing.

Provide friendship.

Give them some love.

Express compassion.

Be empathetic.

Affirm every good decision and every good word they speak.   

Help be a model for caring relationships, by caring for them.

 

jeffrey-lin-714756-unsplash (1).jpg

 

    5. Recognize Any Accomplishment

During your time with them, you can identify their strengths and I would repeat it often. Remember, they missed out on needed, life-giving encouragement.   Everyone needs to hear that they’re good at something and often.

Recognize them for any accomplishment.

 

jason-leung-479251-unsplash (1).jpg

 

Celebrate their accomplishments, and often. Bring it up again and again. You’re essentially saying: I see you

I See You Too,

Pamela

 


Fig¹.  Photo by Mm Teng on Unsplash  Fig².  Photo by Sue Zeng on Unsplash  Fig³.  Photo by RhondaK on Unsplash  Fig⁴.  Photo by Jeffrey Lin on Unsplash  Fig⁵.  Photo by Jason Leung on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Shame on You, Aunt Pamela, That’s a TREE.”

 

“Shame on you, Aunt Pamela, that’s a TREE. We can’t hurt the trees!”

 

A few years ago, my niece Lindsey gave me a great talking to. She was 5 or 6 and needed help in the restroom, so off we went. As we finished up, I pulled two paper towels to dry my hands.

 

macro shot photography of tree during daytime

 

“Shame on you, Aunt Pamela. That’s a tree! We can’t hurt the trees!”

I asked her where she learned that important lesson.

“In school. They teach us paper comes from trees, and we need to keep our trees.”

Anyone who doesn’t have hope for our future should rethink. What a wonderful opening our world is facing where we teach elementary kids the connection between paper and our living trees…to be conscious of conserving, so that Lindsey and others grow up with conservation being a natural part of their lives.

There is a new standard of living being created, and not only our youth, but our elementary school children, are leading the way.

 


Fig¹. Photo by David Vig on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Better To Make a Few Mistakes Being Natural” – Dr. Benjamin Spock

 

“Better to make a few mistakes being natural than to do everything out of a feeling of worry.”

— Dr. Benjamin Spock

 

girl wearing pink camisole on brown plant during daytime

 

It’s better to make a few mistakes being natural.  It’s important to be who we are in a natural, real way.  If we get everything right, and are absolutely perfect, but it’s done with anxiety…. then it actually isn’t right, is it?

 

What we do needs to be done with care, love, calm.  With joy and sincerity…and since Dr. Benjamin Spock was a famous leader in parenting in the 40s, I’ll take his advice not only for parenting, but also for management.  And for our communications, how we live our lives, how we treat others…

 


Dr. Spock was an influential writer on childrearing, who advocated for increased flexibility and affection in the treatment of infants and children.  He was a pediatrician and his book entitled Baby and Childcare is one of the best selling books in history.  Aside from that work, he also published 12 other books.  He was an activist, involved in the anti-war movements in the 1960s and 1970s.  While at Yale University, he became an Olympic gold medalist in rowing.  He married Jane Cheney and they had two children together.

Bio Source: Wikipedia 


Fig¹.Photo by Steve Halama on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: Sit Down at the Table

 

 

“…they’ve done studies on children who are required to sit down at the family table and those who are not.  And the ones who are score higher academically; they’re more well adjusted.”

— Paula Deen

 

 

three people having a toast on table

 

 

Sit down, be present, share. It’s not just about community, about family… but also about being the best we can be. Sitting down at the table with your loved ones for a mealtime shares love, and, helps you reach your goals!

 

Paula Deen did just that… she made ‘sitting down’ at the table with loved ones a life calling.  She does that fulltime, preparing lovely meals, and allowing us to enjoy and make them as well.

 

So take some time to sit with your family, friends, or loved ones.. be supported…be nourished.. and be your best self. Thank you to Paula Deen who lives it daily.

 

Sitting With My Family,

Pamela

 


Paula Deen was born Paula Hiers in Albany, Georgia, the daughter of Corrie A. (née Paul) and Earl Wayne Hiers, Sr. Her parents died before she was 23, and an early marriage ended in divorce. In her 20s, Deen suffered from panic attacks and agoraphobia. She then focused on cooking for her family as something she could do without leaving her house.

Her grandmother Irene Paul had taught her the hand-me-down art of Southern cooking; one of the only places she felt safe was at her own stove, making thousands of pots of chicken and dumplings.  She later moved to Savannah, Georgia, with her sons.  Paula had many different jobs and roles, learning what she loved to do.  She tried hanging wallpaper, working as a bank teller, selling real estate and insurance. She then started a catering service,  making sandwiches and meals, which her sons Jamie and Bobby delivered. She then found her calling.

BioSource: Wikipedia


Citation:

Fig¹. Pablo Merchán Montes on Unsplash