Tag Archives: character

The Classic Pamela Positive: A Home Should Be

 

A home should be inspiring. 

 

All the objects in your home should reinforce your values and character.  Home should be a respite of calm and peace, and a reflection of who you are.

 

A home should demonstrate moderation. 

 

 

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Homes should reflect what is needed.  Meet your needs, and then embrace moderation and simplicity.

 

A home should have balance. 

 

The best homes reflect a sense of balance within the spaces, allowing for different types of activities.  Some may be more energetic, others which are more peaceful.

 

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Be Loyal To Those Who Are Not Present” — Steven Covey

            “One of the most important ways to manifest integrity is to be                           loyal to those who are not present. In doing so, we build the trust of those who are present.  When you defend those who are absent, you retain the trust of those present.”

Stephen Covey, Author of 7 Habits of Highly Effective People

 

How easy it is to make that small comment on the side: to slight the person, who slighted you. Maybe you were kinder, but you still wanted to do that little jab back.  You’re probably embarrassed and can hardly admit it to yourself…

 

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No matter what someone has done to you, you have a job. That’s right, it’s a job, it’s a position, it’s a role, it’s a calling in life, it’s the gift of your life. You can take a stand for goodness.

 

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You can take a stand for truth. You can break—the—chain.

As Steven Covey, one of our greatest leadership writers admonishes us, if you want to demonstrate true integrity, “be loyal to those not present.” That means you uphold the positive virtues and see the goodness in their lives. We start with that. It also means that if you do need to be open and honest, you can do so in a kind and loving way.  You do this in their presence (not others’ presence).

What does that mean if you speak negatively when they’re not present?

You’re doing it for your own ego, your own self-satisfaction, and building up your own sense of “justice.” Do you really think speaking  pejoratively about others is going to lift yourself up? In fact, it’s going to tear you down. If you try to pull others down, you pull down your own integrity: You pull yourself down with them.

 

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Being loyal to those not present builds trust. In essence, what Steven Covey is saying is, be gracious. Uphold others’ character — and your own character — by speaking well of others and expecting their best.

That brings about the best for everyone! And about the best in your life, too!

Speak well,

Pamela

 

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Stephen Covey was a professor and author, writer of The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People.  His work focused primarily on leadership, family and living with principle.  He was a professor at the Jon M. Huntsman School of Business at Utah State University.  When he was younger he played sports but an injury in his youth switched his focus from athletics to academics. He attended the University of Utah for his undergraduate degree and attended Harvard for his MBA. Although he earned his doctorate from Brigham Young University, he has also been awarded ten more honorary doctorates. He was also a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. In his spare time, he enjoyed cycling and giving keynote addresses. He and his wife, Sandra, have nine children and fifty-two grandchildren. 

The Classic Pamela Positive: “I love That… In The Toughest Moments….He Never…Gets Distracted By The Chatter…He Just Keeps…Moving Forward” -Michelle Obama

 

“And I love that even in the toughest moments, when we’re all sweating it – when we’re worried that the bill won’t pass, and it seems like all is lost – Barack never lets himself get distracted by the chatter and the noise. Just like his grandmother, he just keeps getting up and moving forward… with patience and wisdom, and courage and grace.”                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      – Michelle Obama

 

You may face distraction.

 

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But your job is to remain calm and focused on the task at hand.

 

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That’s called character and grace, and we are called to it everyday.

Believing you can be your best,

Pamela

 

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Michelle Obama, the 44th first lady of the United States and wife of U.S. President Barack Obama, was born on January 17, 1964, in Chicago, Illinois. By the sixth grade, Michelle was taking classes in her school’s gifted program. She went on to attend Whitney M. Young Magnet High School, the city’s first magnet high school for gifted children, where, among other activities, she served as the student government treasurer. She attended Princeton University, graduating cum laude in 1985, and went on to earn a degree from Harvard Law School in 1988.

After law school, Michelle worked as an associate in the Chicago branch of the firm Sidley Austin, in the area of marketing and intellectual property. It was there, in 1989, that she met her future husband, Barack Obama, a summer intern to whom she was assigned as an adviser. After two years of dating, Barack proposed, and the couple married on October 3, 1992. Their daughters, Malia and Sasha, were born in 1998 and 2001, respectively. On November 6, 2012, Barack Obama was reelected for a second term as U.S. president. After Mitt Romney conceded defeat, Michelle Obama accompanied her husband with their two daughters, Malia and Sasha, onto the stage at McCormick Place in Chicago, where President Obama delivered his victory speech. As first lady, she focused her attention on current social issues, such as poverty, healthy living and education.

 

Credits:
Fig. 1: Photo by Rawpixel on Unsplash
Fig. 2: Photo by Frank Mckenna on Unsplash