Tag Archives: CEO

The Classic Pamela Positive: Tell Your Team They Are Great and DON’T Give Them Anything To Do 

 

One of the most powerful things you can do to recognize someone on your team is to call them and thank them and say Youre doing a wonderful job today, and I wanted to thank you. Thats it. I just wanted you to know, and for you to take the time to recognize it. Please know how much I appreciate your consistent work and positive attitude.” 

 

Thank You! Heart Text

 

Do not add on a to do.

I know thats tempting as we as CEOs have a lot we want to accomplish! But just let the conversation rest in genuine appreciation.

Its one of the best ways you can thank someone without agenda.

 


Fig¹.  Photo by Raj Vaishnaw on Pexels

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: Promise Yourself – To Be So Strong… Part One of Ten

 

 

This is Part One of Ten in the Series on “The Classic Pamela Positive: Promise Yourself”.

 

Promise Yourself

To be so strong that nothing can disturb your peace of mind.

— Christian D. Larson

 

“Promise Yourself” is a beautiful list of 10 Positives we should “Promise Ourselves.” The piece allows us to embrace life fully by expecting the best and clearing away anything that might hold us back. It’s healthy for our minds and hearts.

 

 

woman sitting on sand

 

 

Here’s your first one, below. I hope you will practice it with me today!  Please let me know your thoughts and how it affects your day, your life, and the people around you.

 

Stay tuned for Part Two of the Ten Part Series “The Classic Pamela Positive: Promise Yourself” tomorrow!

 


Christian D. Larson (1874 – 1962) was a New Thought leader and teacher, as well as a prolific author of metaphysical and New Thought books. He is credited by Horatio Dresser as being a founder in the New Thought movement.  Many of Larson’s books remain in print today, nearly 100 years after they were first published, and his writings influenced notable New Thought authors and leaders, including Religious Science founder, Ernest Holmes.

Larson, of Norwegian origin, was born in Iowa and attended Iowa State College and a Unitarian theological school in Meadville, PA.  While little is known about his personal life and what led to his studies in mental science, what is known is its logical teachings appealed to Larson’s analytical mind and led him to discover that combining theology and science could provide a practical and systematic philosophy of life.  During his time he was honorary president of the International New Thought Alliance and lectured extensively during the 1920s and 1930s. He was a colleague of such notables as William Walker Atkinson, Charles Brodie Patterson, and Home of Truth founder Annie Rix Militz. He developed the Optimist Creed in use today by Optimist International, better known as the Optimist Clubs.

He married wife Georgea L DuBois on February 14, 1918. They had two children, Louise DuBois Larson (born 1920) and Christian D. Larson Jr. (born 1924). The family lived in Beverly Hills for many years.

Bio Source: Wikipedia and Christian D. Larson Home Page


Citation: Photo by Dingzeyu Li on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “You Have to Be Able to Tell People ‘Great Job’ on Things That Didn’t Work”

 

“You have to be able to tell people ‘great job’ on things that didn’t work.”

— J. Kermit Campbell, former CEO of Herman Miller

 

 

Blog4

 

 

Campbell has it right.  A CEO is not an expert except in one area: getting the right people. Actually, let’s add another area: values. You must be a leader who gets the best people and demonstrates the highest values.

Even if you are a manager, you should still think this way. Empower your people to learn and maintain a domain of expertise. Hopefully, you can hire them with it. If you can’t, make sure they have the rapid capability to do so.  Let’s learn from Campbell’s advice to us:

“I don’t believe that my job is to lead design at Herman Miller.  My job is to make sure we have great design leaders, continue to listen and try to learn from them…My job is not to be a creative guy, my job is to create a culture that allows and promotes creativity…

You’re going to have to take risks. It’s not all going to work.

You have to be able to tell people ‘great job’ on things that didn’t work.”

 

*****

 

 

J. Kermit Campbell is a former CEO of Herman Miller, and the current Lead Independent Director of SPX Corporation.  He is an investor or board member for a number of companies and charitable organizations.  Herman Miller is a leading furniture company, founded by D. J. DePree, with a more than 100-year history.  They focus on innovation, and designing products to create a better world.

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: “You Have to Be Able to Tell People ‘Great Job’ on Things That Didn’t Work”

Blog4

“You have to be able to tell people ‘great job’ on things that didn’t work.”

— J. Kermit Campbell, former CEO of Herman Miller

Get inspired by an audio version of this blog!

Campbell has it right.  A CEO is not an expert except in one area: getting the right people. Actually, let’s add another area: values. You must be a leader who gets the best people and demonstrates the highest values.

Even if you are a manager, you should still think this way. Empower your people to learn and maintain a domain of expertise. Hopefully, you can hire them with it. If you can’t, make sure they have the rapid capability to do so.  Let’s learn from Campbell’s advice to us:

“I don’t believe that my job is to lead design at Herman Miller.  My job is to make sure we have great design leaders, continue to listen and try to learn from them…My job is not to be a creative guy, my job is to create a culture that allows and promotes creativity…

You’re going to have to take risks. It’s not all going to work.

You have to be able to tell people ‘great job’ on things that didn’t work.”

J. Kermit Campbell is a former CEO of Herman Miller, and the current Lead Independent Director of SPX Corporation.  He is an investor or board member for a number of companies and charitable organizations.  Herman Miller is a leading furniture company, founded by D. J. DePree, with a more than 100-year history.  They focus on innovation, and designing products to create a better world.

Your Employee is Overwhelmed: Strategy #4

Have you ever wondered how a CEO approaches this problem? Here is the final strategy CEO Pamela Hawley recommends.

Strategy #4: Bring In More Support

Here’s a final option. Recently we had a situation where a stellar team member was bumping through 4 to 6 major documents a week. They were doing an amazing job. But their life circumstances changed, and they had to reduce their hours. As a company, we needed to get these documents done. We brought in more support by a former team member and had her take over some of the projects. We completed the work, and provided greater balance for both team members. ********** We all want things done quickly. But overloading does not lead to success. If you hired the right people, they’re working hard. They should be saying “I can do this successfully and I’m a strong contributor.” That’s the kind of culture you want.

View Strategy #1, Strategy #2, Strategy #3 or Read Full Article Here!

Your Employee is Overwhelmed: Strategy #3

Have you ever wondered how a CEO approaches this problem? Here is the third of four strategies CEO Pamela Hawley recommends. Stay tuned tomorrow for the final strategy!

Strategy #3: Hold Off

No one likes to have a crazy to-do list staring at them every day. As a manager, you must help create a balance for your employees that provides them the time necessary to complete their tasks. Allow them the satisfaction of accomplishing a task, rather than rushing frantically to the next “to do.” You might have a lot more for them to do, but hold off! Will this work for your go-getter culture? It has to. What we’re dealing with here is long-term employee satisfaction and retention. If they’re not happy, other team members will hear about it, lowering group morale. Or they might leave, a costly alternative. In essence, allow your employees to work hard, and be balanced. Otherwise you’re putting a significant dent into your company culture.

Read Pamela’s first two strategies…Strategy #1Strategy #2 and Strategy #4

 

 

Your Employee Is Overwhelmed: Strategy #2

Have you ever wondered how a CEO approaches this problem? Here is the second of four strategies CEO Pamela Hawley recommends. Stay tuned tomorrow for her third suggestion! Read strategy #1 strategy #3 or strategy #4 here!

Strategy #2: Report Up Effectively

Most employees report on their goals and achievements. We suggest having it on a daily or weekly basis. It’s not a long, onerous report. It might be updating a project management tool or a simple email that goes to their manager. At UniversalGiving we call these EODs, or End of Day Reports.

The first three steps focus on what is occurring today:

  • Section One: Priorities
  • Section Two: Activities Completed with Estimated Time
  • Section Three: Next Steps with Deadlines

These three steps are a working report that provides a basis for dialogue if they feel overloaded. Knowing how your employee views his or her priorities is important. You want to understand how the time spent on work translates into the quality of the work done. It will allow you to assess the delegation of projects to that specific employee.  The next step focuses on what is occurring in the future.

Section Four: Future Projects

This section gives an idea of the workload to come, which also helps you better manage the current duties of your employee. If you see that your employee will have a hectic month of work, distribute the work to others. Then no one burns out. The last step logs our accomplishments, reminding us of all the hard work and results we’ve attained.

Section Five: Accomplishments

The fifth section is important for morale. Finished projects are a reminder of achievements. Don’t just move on to the next thing. Have some time to appreciate and celebrate!