Tag Archives: care

The Pamela Positive: “Do Great Deeds with Little Means” – Russell Conwell

“Greatness consists in doing great deeds with little means in the accomplishment of vast purposes.

It consists in the private ranks of life, in helping one’s fellows, in benefiting one’s neighborhood, in blessing one’s own city and state.”

– Russell Conwell

It’s that simple.

Give something today,
Pamela

Russell Conwell (February 15, 1843 – December 6, 1925) was an American Baptist minister, orator, philanthropist, lawyer, and writer. He is best remembered as the founder and first president of Temple University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and for his inspirational lecture Acres of Diamonds. The son of Massachusetts farmers, Conwell attended Yale University and after graduating enlisted in the Union Army during the American Civil War. He was ordained as a Baptist minister in 1880, and delivered his famous speech “Acres of Diamonds” over 6,000 times around the world. The central idea of the work is that one need not look elsewhere for opportunity, achievement, or fortune – the resources to achieve all good things are present in one’s own community. Conwell’s capacity to establish Temple University and his other civic projects largely derived from the income that he earned from the speech. The published version has been regarded as a classic of New Thought literature since the 1870s.

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Come Promisingly Me

496500_17955004Call me I answer in tones you do not recognize
My focus is sharp though distraction may reign
it is Known, be believed; no further strenuous chastise
the intangible simply, come promisingly to gain Continue reading

The Pamela Positive: “Do Great Deeds with Little Means” – Russell Conwell

“Greatness consists in doing great deeds with little means in the accomplishment of vast purposes.

It consists in the private ranks of life, in helping one’s fellows, in benefiting one’s neighborhood, in blessing one’s own city and state.”

– Russell Conwell

It’s that simple.

Give something today,
Pamela

Russell Conwell (February 15, 1843 – December 6, 1925) was an American Baptist minister, orator, philanthropist, lawyer, and writer. He is best remembered as the founder and first president of Temple University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and for his inspirational lecture Acres of Diamonds. The son of Massachusetts farmers, Conwell attended Yale University and after graduating enlisted in the Union Army during the American Civil War. He was ordained as a Baptist minister in 1880, and delivered his famous speech “Acres of Diamonds” over 6,000 times around the world. The central idea of the work is that one need not look elsewhere for opportunity, achievement, or fortune – the resources to achieve all good things are present in one’s own community. Conwell’s capacity to establish Temple University and his other civic projects largely derived from the income that he earned from the speech. The published version has been regarded as a classic of New Thought literature since the 1870s.

What Are Benjamin Franklin’s Three Faithful Friends?

“There are three faithful friends – an old wife, an old dog, and ready money.”      

– Benjamin Franklin

Benjamin Franklin – a leader in creating the United States of America, and civic organizations, and new wisdom.  And his wisdom above is a lot of what counts in life: Companionship, Devotion; and to take Action.  Let’s look at these important elements in our lives.

1- An Old Wife.  I’m not sure it’s about age.  What it is about is a long-term companion that knows you.  They support you, help you, care for you.  Maybe that is an ‘old wife’,  a mother who listens, or a sincere friend.

2- An Old Dog.  A dog is faithful.  Dogs are unconditionally loving, and are there by your side.  They forgive immediately.  Joy and devotion are their qualities.

3- Ready Money.  Why ready money?  When we have a vision, we don’t want to be strapped.  If we want to help the world, we need to have some funds so we aren’t held back, and it doesn’t need to be a lot.  But you usually need something to “start the car” of your vision, and make a change.

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So let’s ensure we have “an old wife, an old dog, and ready money” in whatever way that means in our own lives.  Companionship, Constancy and Change are important for us to be peaceful and to make a difference in our lives, and the world.

                                                                           —✶—

Benjamin Franklin (January 17, 1706 -April 17, 1790) born in Boston, Massachusetts was one of the Founding Fathers of the United States. A noted polymath, Franklin was a leading author, printer, political theorist, politician, postmaster, scientist, musician, inventor, satirist, civic activist, statesman, and diplomat. As a scientist, he was a major figure in the American Enlightenment and physics for his discoveries regarding electricity. He invented the lightning rod, bifocals, the Franklin stove, and a carriage odometer.

Franklin helped draft the Declaration of Independence and the U.S Constitution, and negotiated the 1783 Treaty of Paris, which marked the end of the Revolutionary War. He also served as president of the Pennsylvania Society for Promoting the Abolition of Slavery, wrote many tracts urging the abolition of slavery and petitioned the U.S Congress for it in 1790.  Franklin facilitated many civic organizations, including a fire department and a university.  Franklin was married to Deborah Read. Franklin had three children, Francis, Sarah and William. Benjamin Franklin died on April 17, 1790, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, at the home of his daughter, Sarah. (Biosource: Wikipedia: Benjamin Franklin)

Kellogg’s Company Values at the Heart of Its Brand: Two Values I Love

Here are two values I love from Kellogg Company’s official values:

• “Speak positively and supportively about team members when apart.”

 
“Display openness and curiosity to learn from anyone, anywhere.”

Learn, and care, about each person we meet. This can be very hard to do. Sometimes, we feel we just don’t have time to get to know and value others as much as we’d like.

Yet you can build it into your culture. Here are ideas where you can implement Kelloggs’ values:

1- Make Learning About Your Team a Part of your Management Meetings. 

Have the team leader of the meeting share a Fun Fact every week.  It’s helped UniversalGiving team members bond in new ways.  You will learn things you never imagined.

2- Give Your Team a Creative Voice.  

Allow team members to post on your company blog, even if it is not the exact topic you would normally choose. For example, we have an astute young woman on our team who is very talented. She’s publishing her own book, a young adult fantasy novel. Not a part of UniversalGiving‘s mission directly?  You will find a way: For us, she is posting her book, with links to how you can “Share the Love of Reading” on UniversalGiving or give to the Gift of Literacy.  Now, you are being creative and related!

3- Watch Your Management Meetings.

Sometimes, you and your COO or Management Team need to work on some really key team building of a member who might not be reaching your values or execution.  Sometimes, you have to encourage them to a different or better career path.  Will you speak positively? Just as you must be constructive and compassionate with them in person, so you should in private conversations.  Let’s remember that, if we can. It’s kind, understanding, compassionate, just as we would want to be treated.

____________________________________________________________________________________

John A. Bryant (born 1966 in Brisbane, Australia) is the US-based President and Chief Executive Officer of the Kellogg Company since 2011.  He first joined the company in 1998, taking up positions from Executive Vice President to Chief Operating Officer.  He also serves on the Board of Directors of the Grocery Manufacturers Association, the Consumer Goods Forum, the Food Marketing Institute and Catalyst.  He currently lives in Kalamazoo, Michigan with his wife Alison and their six children.

Bio sources: Wikipedia: John A. Bryant and The Canberra Times

The Kellogg Company (informally Kellogg’s or Kellogg) is a multinational food manufacturing company headquartered in Battle Creek, Michigan. Kellogg’s produces cereal and convenience foods, including cookies, crackers, toaster pastries, cereal bars, fruit-flavored snacks, frozen waffles, and vegetarian foods. The company’s brands include Corn Flakes, Keebler, Nutri-Grain and many more. Their products are manufactured in 35 countries and marketed in over 180 countries. Kellogg’s products reflect the company’s stated Vision, Purpose, and Heritage: “Our Vision is to enrich and delight the world, through foods and brands that matter.  Our Purpose is to nourish families so they can flourish and thrive.  Our Heritage drives the future of our company and keeps us excited about tomorrow.”

Company info sources: Kellogg’s – About Our Company and Wikipedia: Kellogg Company

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Do Great Deeds with Little Means” – Russell Conwell

“Greatness consists in doing great deeds with little means in the accomplishment of vast purposes.

It consists in the private ranks of life, in helping one’s fellows, in benefiting one’s neighborhood, in blessing one’s own city and state.”

– Russell Conwell

It’s that simple.

Give something today,
Pamela

Russell Conwell (February 15, 1843 – December 6, 1925) was an American Baptist minister, orator, philanthropist, lawyer, and writer. He is best remembered as the founder and first president of Temple University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and for his inspirational lecture Acres of Diamonds. The son of Massachusetts farmers, Conwell attended Yale University and after graduating enlisted in the Union Army during the American Civil War. He was ordained as a Baptist minister in 1880, and delivered his famous speech “Acres of Diamonds” over 6,000 times around the world. The central idea of the work is that one need not look elsewhere for opportunity, achievement, or fortune – the resources to achieve all good things are present in one’s own community. Conwell’s capacity to establish Temple University and his other civic projects largely derived from the income that he earned from the speech. The published version has been regarded as a classic of New Thought literature since the 1870s.

Learning from Wealthy Givers: How it Affects our Personal Life

Part One in a Series

Some key findings on wealthy donors to which we should listen.  Remember, philanthropy is considered “care for humanity,” not just simply writing a check.

Donors request the following from nonprofits: efficiency, privacy, efficacy, good listening and care.   These are good lessons learned in any area of life, regardless of running a nonprofit.  See their advice and my notes below.  

 

Enjoy!

Major Findings from America’s Wealthiest Donors: How They Give and How They View Nonprofits

 1. 82% of donors believe nonprofits should spend appropriate amount of overhead

We can be efficient and careful with our personal funds or business accounts.

 2. 78% don’t want their names distributed

Sometimes people don’t want to disclose a personal challenge. They might want to share it with only a few friends.  Or a business conversation should be confidential. We can respect privacy carefully and judiciously. 

3. 37% want details about an nonprofit’s efficacy before donating

Are we being effective, conscientious?  Whether we are learning a language, helping a nephew with homework, coaching soccer, or closing a business deal, we can be careful and wise about how we go about these endeavors.

4. 38% stopped giving because the nonprofit asked too often for inappropriate amount

Good listening and intuition are important in life. How does a person want to be approached when a request, when any request is made? Listen with your eyes, your heart and their body language, not just your ears.  

Many times we have our goals; we want to and hope to achieve them. But let’s be sure we are being highly sensitive to the other person’s goals and needs.   Your heart should meet their heart, when any request is made.

5. 50% would still give the same amount if tax deductions were eliminated

This is heartening to hear, and shows a donor’s generosity and right intention.  Lovely!  

Philanthropy is the love of people. We can learn from wealthy donors, and how they love of people. Their principles are a great example to us all, in any endeavor!  

 

America’s Wealthiest Donors: How They Give and How they View Non-Profits

From The Chronicle of Philanthropy (Nov. 2012)