Tag Archives: business

The Classic Pamela Positive: “I Want The Whole Person.” – D. J. Depree

 

“Henry Ford said, “bring us your hands, and you can leave everything else at home.” D.J. rejected that idea and said completely the opposite: “I want all of you here. I want the whole person.”

- J. Kermit Campbell

 

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Campbell continues, “If I can have 5,000 or 6,000 people who are passionate about what they do…solving problems and finding solutions to our customers’ problems, I’m going to be much better off than if I leave that to 10% of that population, who tell the other people what to do. It’s like a sports team: you can have one or two guys who play well, but if you can get 50 guys on a team all playing at a very high level, you’re very tough to beat.  That’s always been our philosophy.”

 


J. DePree (1891–1990) began work as a clerk for the Michigan Star Furniture Company. In 1914 he married Nellie Miller; they had seven children. In 1923, D. J. bought the Michigan Star Furniture Company with help from a loan from his father-in-law. D. J. renamed the company “Herman Miller” in his honor. D. J. was CEO until 1961; after he stepped down, his two sons took over management of the company. D. J. was also lay pastor of Ventura Baptist Church for eleven years.

Bio Source: Wikipedia, Herman Miller Official Website, Fowler, Glenn, Dec. 13, 1999, D. J. DePree, Who Broke Ground In Furniture Design, Is Dead at 99, The New York Times, http://bit.do/fg6Lq  Fig¹.  Photo by David Martin on Unsplash 

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Don’t Bunt. Aim Out Of The Ballpark.” – David Ogilvy

 

“Don’t bunt. Aim out of the ballpark. Aim for the company of the immortals.”

―David Ogilvy

 

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This is a beautiful clear message, especially in honor of our quirky, beloved Giants, about a clear focus. A focus that aims for the best, drives for excellence, and holds the highest standards in mind. Mr. Ogilvy did that with his advertising firm, and so we can choose to aim out of the ballpark in our chosen endeavor, too.

 


David Mackenzie Ogilvy (23 June 1911 21 July 1999) was an advertising executive, widely hailed as “The Father of Advertising,and the author of the book Ogilvy on Advertising, a general commentary on advertising. He was born in West Horsley, Surrey in England and his parents were Dorothy Blow Fairfield and Francis John Longley Ogilvy, the latter a classics scholar and a financial broker. David attended St Cyprian’s School, Eastbourne; Fettes College in Edinburgh; and Christ Church, Oxford.  While working as an AGA salesman he wrote The Theory and Practice of Selling the AGA Cooker, considered by Fortune magazine as the finest sales instruction manual written. The manual led to his next job as account executive at London advertising agency Mather & Crowther, run by his older brother Francis. After WWII and having worked as a chef, researcher, and farmer Ogilvy started his own advertising agency in New York called Ogilvy, Benson, and Mather, where David was its Chairman until he retired in 1973. In the 1980s he returned as Chairman of the companys India office, then as temporary Chairman of the agencys German office, and visited and represented the companys branches around the world.

Ogilvy married three times, the first two marriages ending in divorce: first to Melinda Street, where they had one child, David Fairfield Ogilvy; then to Anne Cabot; and later on, Herta Lans until his passing in 1999 at his home in Bonnes, France.  In 1967, he was made a Commander of the Order of British Empire (CBE), adding to his many honors and achievements. In his lifetime and onwards he established his advertising philosophys four basic principles: creative brilliance, research, actual results for clients, and professional discipline.  

Bio Source: Wikipedia  Fig¹. Photo by ogilvywashington on flickr

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: Keep Your Balance

 

I think one key point in life is to maintain balance — balance between time for work, time for loved ones, time for oneself, time for interests outside of one’s business. It’s so important to keep that balance, or we’ll simply burn-out.

 

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I remember once when I was young in my career, and meeting with a fairly older, single woman. She was a successful venture capitalist. But I don’t know that I would consider her life successful. She traveled the world incessantly and was on every important board. But she seemed tired and joy was scarce. She told me to “Pack it all in.”

I didn’t. I kept my balance. I started a nonprofit and I did creative improv. I took care of my very young nephews and nieces. I loved life and I loved the people in my life.

 

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We need to be renewed. We need to feel honored as whole, functioning people with families, outside interests, balanced lives, as well as our commitment to achieving the goals and vision of the organizations we run. The beauty of this balance is that I come back energized to UniversalGiving®. My mind has had “time off” and is thrilled to re-engage with our efforts to serve. I look at challenges in a new light. My energy is renewed. I bring new skills to the table; my thoughts are stronger and more helpful. It’s better for me-and for my organization.

Keeping Balanced for Me, for You and Our Way of Giving Back to the World,

Pamela


Fig¹.  Photo by Aziz Acharki on Unsplash  Fig².  Photo by Vincent Delegge on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “I Got My Start by Giving Myself a Start.” – Madam C.J. Walker

 

In the 1900s, Madam C.J. Walker made her mark for black women (and all women) by becoming the first African-American self-made millionaire in America.  She had a problem herself; in setting out to solve it, she helped others.

Madam Walker was losing some of her hair. So she created a hair product company that addressed this need, while helping women feel stronger, prouder, more beautiful. She was a millionaire within fifteen years.

 

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Yet it wasn’t just enhancing women’s beauty and self-esteem that made her unique. She employed thousands of women; she shone with brilliance by being a great CEO. And she left us with some inspiring mottos by which she lived her life.

Two of my favorites are:

 

“I got my start by giving myself a start.”

―Madam C.J. Walker

 

Photography of a Man And Woman Laughing

“I had to make my own living and my own opportunity. But I made it! Don’t sit down and wait for the opportunities to come. Get up and make them.”

―Madam C.J. Walker

 

Go “start” whatever you would love to do. It can be small, it can be on the side, it can be modest. But begin today. You will know yourself more, giving of your “only-you” talents.  You will also be providing opportunities and inspiration for others.

 


In honor of Black History month, we honor Madam C.J. Walker. She was the first self-made American millionaire who was African-American or female. Her own hair loss inspired her to experiment with home remedies, and then sell them throughout the country. She began by selling Madam Walker’s Wonderful Hair Grower, a healing conditioner for scalps. She traveled door-to-door throughout the South and Southeast to sell her products. Her corporation employed as many as 3,000 people at one point. Madam Walker also founded Lelia College to train “hair culturists,” assisting other black women to start their own businesses. She was a Civil Rights activist and philanthropist.

Madam Walker had a daughter, A’Lelia Walker. She became president of her mother’s company in 1919 and remained in that position until her death in August 1931.

Bio Source: Wikipedia  Fig¹. Photo by Wikimedia Commons  Fig². Photo by Min An on Pexels

The Classic Pamela Positive: “You Do Things When the Opportunities Come Along” – Warren Buffett

 

You do things when the opportunities come along.  I’ve had periods in my life when I’ve had a bundle of ideas come along, and I’ve had long dry spells. If I get an idea next week, I’ll do something. If not, I won’t do a damn thing.”  

― Warren Buffett

 

You’re an entrepreneur. A scientist. A playwright. A second-grade teacher with a curriculum you need to put together. An artist. A music organizer. A guitarist. A preacher. All of them need new ideas, new creativity, every day!

 

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It’s exciting… and also a lot of pressure.

What’s happening when “you don’t have any ideas”?

Well, something very important is happening.

First, your brain cannot be on creative overdrive every moment. It needs time to recharge and build up “blank” space. It’s like saying you don’t need to sleep. Body, mind, heart and soul all need time for rest… and then you can keep giving your 100% and be charged to excel again!

 

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Secondly, patience is key. Just as Warren Buffett says, “if he doesn’t have an idea he doesn’t do anything.”

That’s really key. He’s not forcing it. He’s staying patient. He’s believing that the new idea is going to come.

And here’s where the real lesson is. He doesn’t make a billion dollar mistake.

If you get worried, push something, force an answer- it’s usually not right. So Buffett has done a brilliant but simple thing. He hasn’t made a lot of mistakes because he is not pushing it. He’s trusting the creative process. And therefore, waiting, patiently, for that wisdom. Therefore he makes billions of dollars, rather than lose billions of dollars.

 

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Let’s review Buffett’s wisdom again. How does this affect your life? When have you made a rushed mistake? When you have had patience and waited for that peaceful answer? Please comment below!

 


Born in Nebraska in 1930, Warren Buffett demonstrated keen business abilities at a young age. Nebraska was hit hard by the effects of the Great Depression. Like many children of the Depression, Buffett grew up to respect the value of money.

In grade school and high school Buffett not only showed his precocious proclivity for business by delivering newspapers, but also sold stamps, Coca-Cola beverages, golf balls and magazines door-to-door. By the time he was 15, Warren had amassed $2,000 and used it to buy a 40-acre farm in Nebraska. He hired a farm laborer to work on the land, then used the profits to help pay his way through University.

He formed Buffett Partnership Ltd. in 1956, and by 1965 he had assumed control of Berkshire Hathaway. Overseeing the growth of a conglomerate with holdings in the media, insurance, energy and food and beverage industries, Buffett became one of the world’s richest men and a celebrated philanthropist. In June of 2006, Buffett announced his intention to give away most of his fortune to charity. Buffett believes in family and has 4 children, and lives in the same hometown of Nebraska.

Bio Source: Wikipedia  Fig¹.  Photo by LinkedIn Sales Navigator on Unsplash  Fig².  Photo by Jeremy Bishop on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: Read This If You Want To See A True Team At Work

 

Dear Living and Giving Readers,

I just had to share what a wonderful note I received from one of my core team members, Aurora. She works in the Office of the CEO, and is dedicated, professional, and really strives to serve the world! Imagine my surprise as CEO when I received this:

 

“Hi Pamela, Sam, Ayuko,

Today (April 20th, 2018) is my birthday—and in the spirit of Living and Giving™, I wanted to “donate” today. I’ll still send my EOD (End of Day) Report, but I won’t mark today’s three hours in Paychex.

While I personally don’t have a lot of money to donate, I at least hope that donating my time in this way can demonstrate my appreciation for UniversalGiving®.

Thank you so much for all that you do, making the world a better and kinder place.

Best,

Aurora

PS: I’ve been accepted to Princeton’s Ph.D. program for Politics, focusing on International Relations. I requested a one-year deferral so that I can start a church with my friends first in 2018; and, Princeton approved of the deferral request! So, I’ll be getting my Ph.D. starting in Fall 2019! Thank you for all your support since September, encouraging me to grow as a professional and as a person.”

 

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As CEO, you have a lot of news, positive and challenging, that you receive every day. Imagine when I received such positive news above. A team member so dedicated, caring and loving.  It fills your heart. You certainly don’t expect it and when it happens, you are floating with gratitude for days.

And so here was my response. It’s so important to be grateful, but also to recognize and celebrate their lives holistically:

 

“Dear Aurora!

What inspiring and exciting news… CONGRATULATIONS! I am calling you right now. Aurora, that is just wonderful news on all fronts.

First, on Princeton. What an achievement. We are so pleased you are advancing in such a wonderful way. What a gift for them and you to have this opportunity! You will learn so much on the international front… I can’t wait to hear!

Second, great you are accomplishing your goals on the church front. Aung and I pray and say affirmations in the office, and it’s lovely. He’s Buddhist and I’m Christian, and it’s a great way for us to share and give strength to our world and UniversalGiving®. So good for you accomplishing this spiritual goal for yourself. Sharing positivity is so important, and you’ve chosen an important way!

Third, what a great gift! To donate your hard work for today… what an honor to have your thoughtfulness. You are a true, dear, kind ethical and utmost caring person. How honored we are to have you! That will sing in my heart for many years to come. I’m also CC-ing a few other core team members from UniversalGiving® because we love to celebrate our positive culture and any good news!

Thank you again, Aurora, for your great news, and sharing it with our  UniversalGiving® Family. We are rejoicing for you! Great job! Wonderful! Upwards you go, dear Aurora!

Warmly and with Great Gratitude,

Pamela

 

Sometimes, when we work at a nonprofit or do good in the world, we forget it can come right back to you. Aurora gave me that gift today. I am so grateful for Aurora Ling who is a precious member of the UniversalGiving® team.

Everyone has a team. It might be at work; a certain Business Unit; a wrestling team – you’re the coach or you’re on it; your Quaker prayer meeting, mosque, family or after school Physics class.

Be grateful for everything, and especially for your team, today! 

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: “I Want the Whole Person.” – D. J. Depree

 

“Henry Ford said, “bring us your hands, and you can leave everything else at home.” D.J. rejected that idea and said completely the opposite: “I want all of you here. I want the whole person.”

- J. Kermit Campbell

 

person standing and facing plant field during golden hour

 

Campbell continues, “If I can have 5,000 or 6,000 people who are passionate about what they do…solving problems and finding solutions to our customers’ problems, I’m going to be much better off than if I leave that to 10% of that population, who tell the other people what to do. It’s like a sports team: you can have one or two guys who play well, but if you can get 50 guys on a team all playing at a very high level, you’re very tough to beat.  That’s always been our philosophy.”

 


J. DePree (1891–1990) began work as a clerk for the Michigan Star Furniture Company. In 1914 he married Nellie Miller; they had seven children. In 1923, D. J. bought the Michigan Star Furniture Company with help from a loan from his father-in-law. D. J. renamed the company “Herman Miller” in his honor. D. J. was CEO until 1961; after he stepped down, his two sons took over management of the company. D. J. was also lay pastor of Ventura Baptist Church for eleven years.

Bio Source: Wikipedia, Herman Miller Official Website, Fowler, Glenn, Dec. 13, 1999, D. J. DePree, Who Broke Ground In Furniture Design, Is Dead at 99, The New York Times, http://bit.do/fg6Lq


Fig¹.  Photo by David Martin on Unsplash