Tag Archives: bravery

The Classic Pamela Positive: Inhale Courage, Exhale Fear

 

 

Inhale courage, exhale fear

Inhale courage, exhale fear

Inhale courage, exhale fear…

 

 

group of people doing yoga

 

 

Every day you can make a step towards your goals. Every day you can be a kinder person. Every day, you can give and receive more love. Inhale the courage to do so, exhale any fear that is preventing you.

 

 

silhouette of couple sitting on seashore

 

 

Inhaling Love For You And The World,

Pamela

 

 


Citations:
Fig¹. Photo by Erik Brolin on Unsplash
Fig². Jeremy Bishop on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Be Loyal To Those Who Are Not Present” — Steven Covey

            “One of the most important ways to manifest integrity is to be loyal to those who are not present. In doing so, we build the trust of those who are present. When you defend those who are absent, you retain the trust of those present.”

Stephen Covey, Author of 7 Habits of Highly Effective People

 

How easy it is to make that small comment on the side: to slight the person, who slighted you. Maybe you were kinder, but you still wanted to do that little jab back. You’re probably embarrassed and can hardly admit it to yourself…

 

 

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No matter what someone has done to you, you have a job. That’s right, it’s a job, it’s a position, it’s a role, it’s a calling in life, it’s the gift of your life. You can take a stand for goodness.

 

 

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You can take a stand for truth. You can break—the—chain.

As Steven Covey, one of our greatest leadership writers admonishes us, if you want to demonstrate true integrity, “be loyal to those not present.” That means you uphold the positive virtues and see the goodness in their lives. We start with that. It also means that if you do need to be open and honest, you can do so in a kind and loving way.  You do this in their presence (not others’ presence).

What does that mean if you speak negatively when they’re not present?

You’re doing it for your own ego, your own self-satisfaction, and building up your own sense of “justice.” Do you really think speaking  pejoratively about others is going to lift yourself up? In fact, it’s going to tear you down. If you try to pull others down, you pull down your own integrity: You pull yourself down with them.

 

 

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Being loyal to those not present builds trust. In essence, what Steven Covey is saying is, be gracious. Uphold others’ character — and your own character — by speaking well of others and expecting their best.

That brings about the best for everyone! And about the best in your life, too!

Speak well,

Pamela

 

 


 

 

Stephen Covey was a professor and author, writer of The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People. His work focused primarily on leadership, family and living with principle. He was a professor at the Jon M. Huntsman School of Business at Utah State University. When he was younger he played sports but an injury in his youth switched his focus from athletics to academics. He attended the University of Utah for his undergraduate degree and attended Harvard for his MBA. Although he earned his doctorate from Brigham Young University, he has also been awarded ten more honorary doctorates. He was also a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. In his spare time, he enjoyed cycling and giving keynote addresses. He and his wife, Sandra, have nine children and fifty-two grandchildren. 

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Courage Is Not the Absence of Fear, But Rather the Judgment That Something Else Is More Important Than Fear.” – Ambrose Redmoon

 

“Courage is not the absence of fear, but rather the judgment that something else is more important than fear.”

– Ambrose Redmoon

 

What’s more important than fear?

 

 

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Giving.

And that is what my grandmother Oma taught me, about the gift of Giving of Yourself, while on stage.  Let’s not be fearful about what the audience thinks; instead, we should focus on giving to our audience.

Oma was an amazing flute performer and teacher, one of the first women flutists at Julliard School.  She always told me,

 

“It’s ok to have the butterflies. Just make them fly in formation.”  

 

(More about Oma in my past entry “Go on now and get out there immediately.”)

Courage is beautiful: It overcomes our focus on us. Instead, we are thinking about giving of ourselves, rather than what people think of ourselves. Let’s ensure courage takes over and rules in our thoughts today.

Make Your Butterflies Fly Together!

 

 

Butterflies

 

 


 

Ambrose Redmoon (born James Neil Hollingworth, 1933–1996) was a beatnik, hippie, writer, and former manager of the psychedelic folk rock bands Quicksilver Messenger Service and Ace of Cups.  Not much is known about Redmoon but what is known is he was among the authors for the 1991 issue of the now-defunct magazine Gnosis: A Journal of the Western Inner Traditions.  Redmoon contributed his article “No Peaceful Warriors!” (featuring his famous quote on courage) to that magazine and corresponded to the magazine publishers Jay Kinney and his wife Dixie Tracy-Kinney only by mail.  Redmoon also wrote poetry, plays, and was occult editor of the original staff of Rolling Stone magazine.  He has a daughter, Alexandra Carnacchi.

Bio sources: Wikipedia: Ambrose Redmoon and The mysterious Ambrose Redmoon’s healing words

Quote source: Quotes on Fear and Other Profound Sayings

The Classic Pamela Positive: “And the Day Came When the Risk to Remain Tight In a Bud Was More Painful Than the Risk It Took to Blossom.” – Anais Nin

 

“And the Day came when the risk to remain tight in a bud was more painful than the risk it took to blossom.”

-Anais Nin

 

There is certainly a time to “stay in your bud,” to hibernate. There are times when it is important to be quiet, reflective. In this space, one can hear the truth, and we can ask questions which gear us towards wise actions:

 

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What shall I do for the next step to help further my business today?

What shall I do to help enhance my relationship with my husband?

What shall I do to help bring peace into a colleague’s day?

Perhaps…. it is slowing down.  It is identifying the top two companies we should speak with who would be good partners — rather than the top 10. Or sending positive stats on your husband’s favorite sports teams. Or buying a chocolate chip cookie for your colleague and leaving it on her desk with a kind note and a smile.  Anything we are impelled to do with love as our direction, is the right thing to do.

So if we listen…

and follow the footsteps of Truth in serving others…

That wisdom leads us to larger views….

and larger questions.

Perhaps there is a bigger step in our future… and it is a time to really blossom. Our bud must come forth.

 

 

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So we keep listening… at some point, wisdom will make it so clear that we must take action in a revolutionary way. Perhaps it is something we had thought of, or perhaps a surprise. It could be a career change. It could be setting up an annual get-away with your husband or changing where you and your husband live.  It could be that we manage more coworkers, or move into another business unit.

But we will be listening.  We will be poised. We will be ready to blossom!

 


 

Anaïs Nin (born Angela Anaïs Juana Antolina Rosa Edelmira Nin y Culmell, February 21, 1903 – January 14, 1977) was an American author born to Spanish-Cuban parents in France, where she was also raised. She spent some time in Spain and Cuba but lived most of her life in the United States where she became an established author. She published journals (which span more than 60 years, beginning when she was 11 years old and ending shortly before her death), novels, critical studies, essays, and short stories. A great deal of her work, including Delta of Venus and Little Birds, was published posthumously. Nin was first married to Hugh Parker Guiler, and later to actor Rupert Pole.

Bio source: Wikipedia: Anais Nin

Quote source: Quotes on Fear and Other Profound Sayings

The Classic Pamela Positive: Inhale Courage, Exhale Fear

 

Inhale courage, exhale fear

Inhale courage, exhale fear

Inhale courage, exhale fear…

 

 

erik-brolin-711851-unsplash (1).jpg

 

 

Every day you can make a step towards your goals. Every day you can be a kinder person. Every day, you can give and receive more love. Inhale the courage to do so, exhale any fear that is preventing you.

 

 

Text placeholder (1).jpg

 

 

Inhaling Love For You And The World,

Pamela

 

 

Citations:
Fig. 1: Photo by Erik Brolin on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Be Loyal To Those Who Are Not Present” — Steven Covey

            “One of the most important ways to manifest integrity is to be                           loyal to those who are not present. In doing so, we build the trust of those who are present.  When you defend those who are absent, you retain the trust of those present.”

Stephen Covey, Author of 7 Habits of Highly Effective People

 

How easy it is to make that small comment on the side: to slight the person, who slighted you. Maybe you were kinder, but you still wanted to do that little jab back.  You’re probably embarrassed and can hardly admit it to yourself…

 

Screen Shot 2018-05-31 at 12.32.34 PM

 

No matter what someone has done to you, you have a job. That’s right, it’s a job, it’s a position, it’s a role, it’s a calling in life, it’s the gift of your life. You can take a stand for goodness.

 

Screen Shot 2018-05-31 at 12.32.45 PM

 

You can take a stand for truth. You can break—the—chain.

As Steven Covey, one of our greatest leadership writers admonishes us, if you want to demonstrate true integrity, “be loyal to those not present.” That means you uphold the positive virtues and see the goodness in their lives. We start with that. It also means that if you do need to be open and honest, you can do so in a kind and loving way.  You do this in their presence (not others’ presence).

What does that mean if you speak negatively when they’re not present?

You’re doing it for your own ego, your own self-satisfaction, and building up your own sense of “justice.” Do you really think speaking  pejoratively about others is going to lift yourself up? In fact, it’s going to tear you down. If you try to pull others down, you pull down your own integrity: You pull yourself down with them.

 

Screen Shot 2018-05-31 at 12.32.53 PM

 

Being loyal to those not present builds trust. In essence, what Steven Covey is saying is, be gracious. Uphold others’ character — and your own character — by speaking well of others and expecting their best.

That brings about the best for everyone! And about the best in your life, too!

Speak well,

Pamela

 

******

 

Stephen Covey was a professor and author, writer of The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People.  His work focused primarily on leadership, family and living with principle.  He was a professor at the Jon M. Huntsman School of Business at Utah State University.  When he was younger he played sports but an injury in his youth switched his focus from athletics to academics. He attended the University of Utah for his undergraduate degree and attended Harvard for his MBA. Although he earned his doctorate from Brigham Young University, he has also been awarded ten more honorary doctorates. He was also a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. In his spare time, he enjoyed cycling and giving keynote addresses. He and his wife, Sandra, have nine children and fifty-two grandchildren.