Tag Archives: art

The Classic Pamela Positive: Start by Listening

“My goal is to extract a design that emerges from the essence of the music rather than to decorate its story…   This process usually takes two to three months of immersing myself in the opera by listening to it 200 to 300 times.”

 

– Jun Kaneko

 

the magic flute.jpg

 

Master designer Jun Kaneko provides the design for the San Francisco Opera’s production of The Magic Flute…and what a powerful way he envisages how to create this vision for us all.  It’s synergistic, based on pulling all elements together and starting with one of the most important qualities…listening.

 

No matter your profession, you can be a good listener today. You might listen to the preschool kids you manage.  You might listen to your elderly dog that would like a nice tummy rub. You might listen to your neighbor who asked you to trim the tree so it doesn’t hang over his property.   Or you might create an amazing work of art such as Jun Kaneko through The Magic Flute.  While his work seems supra-important, every person’s effort to listen is just as important.  

 

If we listened, and did this for hours like Jan, everyone would be happy. Relationships with people would be lovely.

 

The world can be lovely, if we will just listen,

 

Pamela

 

*****

 

Jun Kaneko is a Japanese-American visual artist, with sculptures and other artwork in more than 50 museums. He has previously worked on opera productions for Madama Butterfly and Fidelio. His works in clay explore the effects of repeated abstract surface motifs. He was the Production Designer for the San Francisco Opera’s production of The Magic Flute, which opened in June 2012.

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: “I shut my eyes in order to see.” – Paul Gauguin

“I shut my eyes in order to see.” 

– Paul Gauguin

 

 

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Paul Gauguin (1848-1903) was an artist who was renowned for his Post Impressionism painting in the 19th century. He was an innovator in the use of bold colors. At the same time, he also brought out the meaning of each subject. He balanced authenticity with innovation.

 

What we can learn from Paul Gauguin: Let’s ‘see’ differently. Don’t use your eyes.  Instead, use “meaning” to see.

 

 

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What’s meaningful to you? Be bold in recognizing it. You’ll see an amazing painting of goodness, kindness and abundance all around you, if you will just see.

 

 

*****

 

Eugène Henri Paul Gauguin (7 June 1848 – 8 May 1903) was a leading French Post-Impressionist artist who was not well appreciated until after his death. Gauguin was later recognized for his experimental use of colors and synthetist style that were distinguishably different from Impressionism. His work was influential to the French avant-garde and many modern artists, such as Pablo Picasso, and Henri Matisse. Gauguin’s art became popular after his death and many of his paintings were in the possession of Russian collector Sergei Shchukin. He was an important figure in the Symbolist movement as a painter, sculptor, printmaker, ceramist, and writer. His bold experimentation with coloring led directly to the Synthetist style of modern art, while his expression of the inherent meaning of the subjects in his paintings, under the influence of the cloisonnist style, paved the way to Primitivism and the return to the pastoral. He was also an influential proponent of wood engraving and woodcuts as art forms.

Bio Source: Wikipedia

The Classic Pamela Positive: Start by Listening

“My goal is to extract a design that emerges from the essence of the music rather than to decorate its story…   This process usually takes two to three months of immersing myself in the opera by listening to it 200 to 300 times.”

 

– Jun Kaneko

 

the magic flute.jpg

 

Master designer Jun Kaneko provides the design for the San Francisco Opera’s production of The Magic Flute…and what a powerful way he envisages how to create this vision for us all.  It’s synergistic, based on pulling all elements together and starting with one of the most important qualities…listening.

 

No matter your profession, you can be a good listener today. You might listen to the preschool kids you manage.  You might listen to your elderly dog that would like a nice tummy rub. You might listen to your neighbor who asked you to trim the tree so it doesn’t hang over his property.   Or you might create an amazing work of art such as Jun Kaneko through The Magic Flute.  While his work seems supra-important, every person’s effort to listen is just as important.  

 

If we listened, and did this for hours like Jan, everyone would be happy. Relationships with people would be lovely.

 

The world can be lovely, if we will just listen,

 

Pamela

 

*****

 

Jun Kaneko is a Japanese-American visual artist, with sculptures and other artwork in more than 50 museums. He has previously worked on opera productions for Madama Butterfly and Fidelio. His works in clay explore the effects of repeated abstract surface motifs. He was the Production Designer for the San Francisco Opera’s production of The Magic Flute, which opened in June 2012.

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: Divide and Rule…Unite and Lead

He was brilliant, insightful and troubled at times, too… but this is a great quote from Johann Wolfgang von Goethe:

 

“Divide and rule, a sound motto; unite and lead, a better one.”

 

It’s sad sometimes how, per Goethe’s quote above, we at times need to separate into distinct groups in order to have harmony…but in a close future, the habit will be one of uniting…and so a better you, me, all of us.

 

*****

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749-1832) was a German poet, playwright, novelist, and natural philosopher, best known for his two-part poetic drama Faust, which he started around the age of twenty-three and didn’t finish till shortly before his death sixty years later. He is considered one of the greatest contributors of the German Romantic period. At the age of sixteen, in 1765, Goethe went to Leipzig University to study law as his father wished, though he also gained much recognition from the Rococo poems and lyric he wrote during this period. In 1766 he fell in love with Anne Catharina Schoenkopf (1746-1810) and wrote his joyfully exuberant collection of poems Annette.

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe now rests in the Fürstengruft or “Royal Tomb” in the “Historic Cemetery” in Wiemar where his dear friend Schiller is also laid to rest. In honour of these two famous German men of letters, a statue of Goethe and Schiller now stands at the German National Theatre in Munich. UNESCO’S “Memory of the World” list includes the handwritten works of Goethe preserved by the Goethe-Schiller-Archive.

Bio Source: The Literature Network

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Make Each Day Your Masterpiece.” – John Wooden

 

“Make each day your masterpiece.”

— John Wooden

 

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Unmatched. That’s what Coach John Wooden is asking us to be.

 

To live a life unmatched each day — which is a masterpiece — means living according to your values.

 

When I usually think about a gargantuan goal, I think of something more along the lines of an Olympian. Yet it doesn’t always mean running (or winning) a marathon.

 

It is being your own masterpiece. That means today, you live with kindness in all the minute interactions you might have. It’s not just about doing your best, yet also treating others your best.  You, your being and presence, are the kind masterpiece that positively affects the world.

 

From living your masterpiece as an individual, and on this basis of values — only then can you paint another masterpiece. Pick a passion… be it gardening, being an excellent bookkeeper, being elected to office, writing a short story, exploring the best hikes and appreciating nature… And step by step, create excellence. Get inducted into your own hall of fame.

 

But remember, the greatest hall of fame is… treating others your best.

 

*****

John Robert Wooden (October 14, 1910 – June 4, 2010) was an American basketball coach. He was a member of the Basketball Hall of Fame as both a player (inducted in 1961) and as a coach (inducted in 1973). He was the first person ever enshrined in both categories. His ten NCAA national championships in a 12-year period while at UCLA are unmatched by any other college basketball coach.  He was married to Nellie Riley for 53 years, and they had two children.  After Nellie’s death, John had a monthly ritual until his own death 25 years later, of visiting her grave and writing her a love letter.

The Classic Pamela Positive: Start by Listening

the magic flute.jpg

“My goal is to extract a design that emerges from the essence of the music rather than to decorate its story…   This process usually takes two to three months of immersing myself in the opera by listening to it 200 to 300 times.” – Jun Kaneko

Master designer Jun Kaneko provides the design for the San Francisco Opera’s production of The Magic Flute…and what a powerful way he envisages how to create this vision for us all.  It’s synergistic, based on pulling all elements together and starting with one of the most important qualities…listening.

Jun Kaneko is a Japanese-American visual artist, with sculptures and other artwork in more than 50 museums.  He has previously worked on opera productions for Madama Butterfly and Fidelio.  He was the Production Designer for the San Francisco Opera’s production of The Magic Flute, in June 2012.

The Classic Pamela Positive: Start by Listening

the magic flute.jpg

“My goal is to extract a design that emerges from the essence of the music rather than to decorate its story…   This process usually takes two to three months of immersing myself in the opera by listening to it 200 to 300 times.” – Jun Kaneko

Master designer Jun Kaneko provides the design for the San Francisco Opera’s production of The Magic Flute…and what a powerful way he envisages how to create this vision for us all.  It’s synergistic, based on pulling all elements together and starting with one of the most important qualities…listening.

Jun Kaneko is a Japanese-American visual artist, with sculptures and other artwork in more than 50 museums.  He has previously worked on opera productions for Madama Butterfly and Fidelio.  He was the Production Designer for the San Francisco Opera’s production of The Magic Flute, in June 2012.