Tag Archives: Abraham Lincoln

The Classic Pamela Positive: Do Good, Feel Good

 

 

Do Good, Feel Good. What Kind of Ethics is That?

 

“When I do good, I feel good; when I do bad, I feel bad, and that is my religion.”

– Abraham Lincoln

 

 

meadow-680607_640

 

 

It’s straight from our esteemed President Lincoln, who is referring to that still small voice that tells us right and wrong. Everyone has it within…and we hear that gentle voice urging us one way or not.  So President Lincoln is not calling for a marvelous free for all where anyone follows their whim.  He’s calling us to listen to an internal guide of Truth.

It’s about truly doing good, authentic, down home, core, natural goodness.   This is something which is in all of us.  And it’s available to us all.   Do Good, feel that confirmation in your heart that it is the right thing. Then you feel good, and you know it is right. And then I’d add, keep on doing whatever is good!

 

 


 

 

Abraham Lincoln served as the 16th President of the United States, during the Civil War.  He was instrumental in ending slavery and is admired for his commitment to national unity, equal rights, liberty, and democracy in America.  He is also known for his humble background, self-education, and skill with writing and rhetoric.  He was not a member of any one organized religion, but he frequently used Biblical imagery and references in his writing and speaking, and referenced a Providence who had a higher purpose.  The Civil War and the deaths of two of his children led him towards the end of his life to more frequently speak of dependence on God.

The Classic Pamela Positive: May Your Work Bring Just and Lasting Peace

 

President Lincoln advised us…

 

“Whatever work you are devoted to….may it bring just and lasting peace.”

 

Our respected President Abraham Lincoln brought this to light in his 1865 Inaugural Address. What a calling for each of us to think, as we go about our work each day, how it can bring “just and lasting peace.”  And I think work here is not just our professional work, but any task to which we are devoting ourselves.  Any project, endeavor, activity — from raising a child to decorating a Valentine’s Day wreath — can have kindness, justice and peace as a necessary ingredient to our performing of it.

 

 

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President Lincoln says something instrumental here: As we strive for our goal, it should be peace brought between each one us, and then also with all countries. The point here is that gentle justice, no matter how small, and a caring, kind sense of peacefulness in all our interactions, bring that sense of worldwide peace. And it must start with ourselves, our conversations, our actions between each person we meet. That’s a great calling for us in living rightly every day!

 

 


 

 

Abraham Lincoln (February 12, 1809 – April 15, 1865) served as the 16th President of the United States. Lincoln led the United States through the American Civil War and in so doing, preserved the Union, ended slavery, strengthened the national government. He promoted rapid modernization of the economy through banks, canals, railroads and tariffs to encourage the building of factories. He is admired for his commitment to national unity, equal rights, liberty, and democracy in America. 

The second child of Thomas Lincoln and Nancy Lincoln,  Abraham was self-educated, and became a country lawyer, a Whig Party leader, Illinois state legislator during the 1830s, and a one-term member of the United States House of Representatives during the 1840s. Married to Mary Todd in 1842, he was an affectionate husband and father of four children.

Bio Source: Wikipedia: Abraham_Lincoln

The Classic Pamela Positive: A Solution to Any Relationship Problem: What Abraham Lincoln Did

 

“You can have no conflict without being yourselves the aggressors… Though passion may have strained it must not break our bonds of affection.”

 

— Abraham Lincoln

 

 

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No matter how we feel we have been wronged, let’s follow Lincoln’s wise advice.

 

At a minimum, we can pause before we take action.

 

We slow down to determine the right pathway.

 

 

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Even if we take a stance for what is right, we must come not from a space of ourselves  being right.

 

Taking action simply because we are right does not serve the end.  Taking action because we feel wronged most certainly doesn’t.

 

It wins no battles.  Your opponent, who is indeed your friend, will not feel heard, respected, even loved.

 

 

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We must step back and come from a space of calm and centeredness, expecting the best for both parties. Then, listening as to what that next step should be, we will be led.  Your response, then, is not a reaction; it is thoughtful.   It is not ever in retaliation, for no law endorses it. It is of pure motive, as Abraham Lincoln speaks to “the better angels of our nature.”

 

It does not matter if you are in politics, business, a personal relationship, in a family.  It all applies. It’s a law of nature that allows us to keep that “Union” that Abraham Lincoln fought so dearly for, for our country. Thus by his example and success, we too can take a stand to preserve the union of any relationship in our lives.

 

*****

 

Abraham Lincoln served as the 16th President of the United States, during the Civil War.  He was instrumental in ending slavery and is admired for his commitment to national unity, equal rights, liberty, and democracy in America. He is also known for his humble background, self-education, and skill with writing and rhetoric. He was not a member of any one organized religion, but he frequently used Biblical imagery and references in his writing and speaking, and referenced a Providence who had a higher purpose. The Civil War and the deaths of two of his children led him near the end of his life to more frequently speak of dependence on God.

Quote Source: Lincoln’s First Inaugural Address, quoted by Bob Buford in his newsletter article, “Prayers of Three Great Men in Unsettled Times.”

The Classic Pamela Positive: Do Good, Feel Good

 

Do Good, Feel Good. What Kind of Ethics is That?

 

“When I do good, I feel good; when I do bad, I feel bad, and that is my religion.”

– Abraham Lincoln

meadow-680607_640

It’s straight from our esteemed President Lincoln, who is referring to that still small voice that tells us right and wrong. Everyone has it within…and we hear that gentle voice urging us one way or not.  So President Lincoln is not calling for a marvelous free for all where anyone follows their whim.  He’s calling us to listen to an internal guide of Truth.

It’s about truly doing good, authentic, down home, core, natural goodness.   This is something which is in all of us.  And it’s available to us all.   Do Good, feel that confirmation in your heart that it is the right thing. Then you feel good, and you know it is right. And then I’d add, keep on doing whatever is good!

 

*****

 

Abraham Lincoln served as the 16th President of the United States, during the Civil War.  He was instrumental in ending slavery and is admired for his commitment to national unity, equal rights, liberty, and democracy in America.  He is also known for his humble background, self-education, and skill with writing and rhetoric.  He was not a member of any one organized religion, but he frequently used Biblical imagery and references in his writing and speaking, and referenced a Providence who had a higher purpose.  The Civil War and the deaths of two of his children led him towards the end of his life to more frequently speak of dependence on God.

The Pamela Positive: May Your Work Bring Just and Lasting Peace

President Lincoln advised us,

“Whatever work you are devoted to….may it bring just and lasting peace.”

 

lincoln.jpeg

 

Our respected President Abraham Lincoln brought this to light in his 1865  Inaugural Address. What a calling for each of us to think on, as we go about our work each day, how it can bring “just and lasting peace.”  I think work here is not just our professional work, but any task to which we are devoting ourselves. Any project, endeavor, activity — from raising a child to decorating a Valentine’s Day wreath — can have kindness, justice and peace as a necessary ingredient to our performing of it.

President Lincoln says something instrumental here: As we strive for our goal, it should be peace brought between each one of us, and then also with all countries.

The point here is that gentle justice, no matter how small, and a caring, kind sense of peacefulness in all our interactions, both bring that sense of worldwide peace. And it must start with ourselves, our conversations, our actions between each person we meet. That’s a great calling for us in today’s world!

***

Abraham Lincoln served as the 16th President of the United States during the Civil War. He was instrumental in ending slavery with his Emancipation Proclamation and is admired for his commitment to national unity, equal rights, liberty, and democracy in America. Lincoln was born in Hodgenville, Kentucky to a humble home; he was later elected to the Illinois state legislature (1834) before entering into the U.S. House of Representatives (1847) and then becoming President of the United States (1860). Lincoln’s bynames include those of “Honest Abe,” “the Rail-Splitter,” and “the Great Emancipator.”

The Classic Pamela Positive: Do Good, Feel Good

meadow-680607_640Do Good, Feel Good. What Kind of Ethics is That?

It’s straight from our esteemed President Lincoln, who is referring to that still small voice that tells us right and wrong. Everyone has it within…and we hear that gentle voice urging us one way or not.  So President Lincoln is not calling for a marvelous free for all where anyone follows their whim.  He’s calling us to listen to an internal guide of Truth.

It’s about truly doing good, authentic, down home, core, natural goodness.   This is something which is in all of us.  And it’s available to us all.   Do Good, feel that confirmation in your heart that it is the right thing. Then you feel good, and you know it is right. And then I’d add, keep on doing whatever is good!

“When I do good, I feel good; when I do bad, I feel bad, and that is my religion.”

– Abraham Lincoln

—✶—

Abraham Lincoln served as the 16th President of the United States, during the Civil War.  He was instrumental in ending slavery and is admired for his commitment to national unity, equal rights, liberty, and democracy in America.  He is also known for his humble background, self-education, and skill with writing and rhetoric.  He was not a member of any one organized religion, but he frequently used Biblical imagery and references in his writing and speaking, and referenced a Providence who had a higher purpose.  The Civil War and the deaths of two of his children led him towards the end of his life to more frequently speak of dependence on God.

The Classic Pamela Positive: Do Good, Feel Good

meadow-680607_640Do Good, Feel Good. What Kind of Ethics is That?

It’s straight from our esteemed President Lincoln, who is referring to that still small voice that tells us right and wrong. Everyone has it within…and we hear that gentle voice urging us one way or not.  So President Lincoln is not calling for a marvelous free for all where anyone follows their whim.  He’s calling us to listen to an internal guide of Truth.

It’s about truly doing good, authentic, down home, core, natural goodness.   This is something which is in all of us.  And it’s available to us all.   Do Good, feel that confirmation in your heart that it is the right thing. Then you feel good, and you know it is right. And then I’d add, keep on doing whatever is good!

“When I do good, I feel good; when I do bad, I feel bad, and that is my religion.”

– Abraham Lincoln

—✶—

Abraham Lincoln served as the 16th President of the United States, during the Civil War.  He was instrumental in ending slavery and is admired for his commitment to national unity, equal rights, liberty, and democracy in America.  He is also known for his humble background, self-education, and skill with writing and rhetoric.  He was not a member of any one organized religion, but he frequently used Biblical imagery and references in his writing and speaking, and referenced a Providence who had a higher purpose.  The Civil War and the deaths of two of his children led him towards the end of his life to more frequently speak of dependence on God.