Category Archives: Uncategorized

The Importance of A Conversation

It’s just a conversation.

You’re just chatting.

You’re at a sports event and you’re catching up, in line at the grocery store, after church, or at your child’s gymnastic event. It’s talk. It’s casual, it’s no big deal.

Or is it?

Each conversation can be a treasure–or a dumpster. What you say can uplift someone, or it can drag them down.

Your tone can affect them. If you’re down they might feel it. They might go home to dinner, and focus on a low mood rather than the great presentation they had that day.

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If you’re positive, you’ll lead them to a more peaceful state of mind. If your topics are about joy, they’ll likely be more joyous. It’s that simple.

How you affect them affects how they treat the next person they encounter. Every conversation is part of a chain for good, stress, joy, or negativity.

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Are you stressed? It wont draw more people on to you. Are you positive? Then you can be grateful for the wonderful partnership you have, and expand it.

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It’s not just chatter. Every conversation leads to something. Make it for good! 

Sincerely,

Pamela

 

 

A Landless Country…

There are 60 million refugees and displaced people in the world. That would be the population of the 11th largest country.

But it is stateless, landless, lawless, unsupported.  “This country” doesn’t exist.desert-736096_960_720.jpg

We must have courage to help people one by one until this country of people has a true home.

Aikido Has No End

Aikido’s founder, Morihei Ueshiba, was born in 1883 in the fishing and farming village of Tanabe, Japan. He was the only surviving son of a prosperous father and cultured mother who considered him their gift from heaven. His premature birth hindered his physical development; even when he was fully grown, he was little more than 5 feet tall.
His father, Yoroku Ueshiba, became concerned about the boy’s small and weak physique and encouraged him to engage in sumo wrestling, swimming and running. As the youth progressed in the sports, he began to realize his physical potential.
Other than mathematics and physics, classroom studies held little interest for the young Morihei Ueshiba. Morihei Ueshiba was a restless spirit in his younger days, charging from one occupation to the next, performing his duties easily but finding no interest in them. At the age of 18, he was drawn to the martial arts, and until his death, the arts continued to delight and nourish him.  Morihei Ueshiba quit his first and second jobs because they were too confining. When he became politically involved in helping local fishermen fight an oppressive new law, his councilman father lost patience. He gave his son some money and told him to find a career that suited him.
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In 1936 Morihei Ueshiba renamed his art aiki budo, and in 1942 he emerged with a mature, modified art—now officially called aikido. The new name is a combination of separate ideas: ai means harmony, ki means spirit or energy, and do means discipline.
In his classes, Morihei Ueshiba discouraged his students from mimicking his movements and forms. Instead, he wanted them to practice a form so many times that it became part of their being. “Learn and forget,” he would say. “Make the technique a part of your body before you move on.”
Through aikido, Morihei Ueshiba developed extraordinary self-defense skills. He could take down and pin opponents of much greater size. He could throw a dozen men simultaneously. He ordered his students to ambush him from eight directions and easily manipulated them to his advantage while his feet stayed within a circle barely encompassing them.
 “Aikido has no end,” he said before he died. “There’s just the beginning and further growth.” The founder of aikido may have passed on, but his art continues to thrive around the world.

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Morihei Ueshiba was born December 14, 1883. Ueshiba was a martial artist and founder of the Japanese martial art of aikido; he is often referred to as “the founder” or “Great Teacher”. Aikido is a synthesis of Ueshiba’s martial studies, philosophy, and religious beliefs. Ueshiba’s goal was to create an art that practitioners could use to defend themselves while also protecting their attacker from injury.

Ueshiba developed aikido primarily during the late 1920s through the 1930s through the synthesis of the older martial arts that he had studied. From the end of the war until the 1960s, he worked to promote aikido throughout Japan and abroad. In his classes, Morihei Ueshiba discouraged his students from mimicking his movements and forms. Instead, he wanted them to practice a form so many times that it became part of their being. “Learn and forget,” he would say. “Make the technique a part of your body before you move on.” Ueshiba regularly practiced other spiritual and religious rites as well, and viewed his studies of aikido as part of this spiritual training. He died of cancer of the liver in 1969, he was 86. “Aikido has no end,” he said before he died. “There’s just the beginning and further growth.” The founder of aikido may have passed on, but his art continues to thrive around the world.

What Children in Syria Think About

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Here is a heartfelt letter from children in Syria. This is what they think about.
We are children from Syria; some of us came to Lebanon two years ago, and others came three or four years ago.
We suffer from many problems; one of them is being beaten by others. For example, in the school, we are beaten by Lebanese students. In the streets, we are beaten as well and some people make fun of us. A friend and his brother are sometimes beaten by the owner of the house where they live.
We also suffer from big economic problems. For instance, there is someone in the group whose brothers sell tissues in the street to bring money to help their parents. But sometimes Lebanese children steal the tissues from them or the money they gained from the selling. Some children cannot register at the school due to economic conditions and others because they lack legal papers. 
Despite all this, we still have dreams. Our dreams are like the dreams of all other children. We hope that no one will beat us on the road, in the neighborhood, at school, or at home. We hope that no one will speak to us in a bad way, and we would like to be treated by the Lebanese and the Syrians in a good way.
In Syria, we used to live in a house, and we live now in a tent. We wish to go back to our homes and our country, and that the war is over and that our parents can find a job to work just like any other parents. 
We also dream that the truth will come to light in order to go back to Syria and all the problems will be over. Coming back to Syria is like the re-entry to paradise. 
All of us have dreams for the future:
– I dream to become a football player and help people through sports (Ahmad)
– I dream to be a doctor in the future (Haitham)
– I dream to be a professor (Muhannad)
– I also dream to become a teacher (Fatima)
– I would love to become a police officer to help people (Wael)
– I would love to become president in order to help everyone (Madiha)
Finally, we want to thank you for all your efforts and your concern about us. Thanks you for coming here and helping us, and we wish if you can make all our dreams come true. We would like that this message could reach all decision-makers in the world in order to help us in achieving our dreams. 
-Noah, Mouhanned, Thanaa, Doha, Wael, Hiba, Fatima, Madiha, Ahmad, Saleh, Haitham, Ahmad
 
 

Einstein said, “No problem can be solved from the same consciousness that created it.” Part One

Facing a tough time at work?  A challenge in your marriage?
What got you there
          is not going to get you out of there. 
 
                 This isn’t just about changing your mind.
                          This is about a change of consciousness. 
If you do a  Google search for mind you’ll find:
“the element of a person that enables them to be aware of the world.”
Be aware. I love that. It’s not just accept this random thought that comes to me.
My mind is precious, and I can gear it to be “aware of the world.”  That means being attuned to what is happening in my relationships.  It’s not just going through the motions to be a great coworker, wife or neighbor. It’s about being aware of the world of relationships around you.
Equally, mind can mean to:
  1. be distressed, annoyed, or worried by.
Wow. All of a sudden our mind becomes our enemy.  We let it get us worried.  It’s not anything that made it be so, it’s just that our mind can become distressed/annoyed/worried, just because.
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CONSCIOUSNESS IS DIFFERENT
Yet consciousness is different.  It’s “the state of being awake and aware of one’s surroundings.” And that it’s “especially something within ourself.”  
Now that’s different! That’s not just being aware, but also being awake. Be alert to what your mind is telling you. Be awake to the still small voice.
Our mind can be positive or negative. Consciousness is the state of being awake to ourselves, to our world, and the people we affect.
As Einstein says, “No problem can be solved from the same consciousness that created it.”
That means in whatever situation we are facing, we need to rise up to a new consciousness.    Now you can address your husband or your coworker in a meaningful way. Take a new approach!
14 Mar 1951, Princeton, New Jersey, USA --- Albert Einstein sticks out his tongue when asked by photographers to smile on the occasion of his 72nd birthday on March 14, 1951. --- Image by © Bettmann/CORBIS

14 Mar 1951, Princeton, New Jersey, USA — Albert Einstein sticks out his tongue when asked by photographers to smile on the occasion of his 72nd birthday on March 14, 1951. — Image by © Bettmann/CORBIS

Einstein said it: “No problem can be solved from the same consciousness that created it.”

14 Mar 1951, Princeton, New Jersey, USA --- Albert Einstein sticks out his tongue when asked by photographers to smile on the occasion of his 72nd birthday on March 14, 1951. --- Image by © Bettmann/CORBIS

14 Mar 1951, Princeton, New Jersey, USA — Albert Einstein sticks out his tongue when asked by photographers to smile on the occasion of his 72nd birthday on March 14, 1951. — Image by © Bettmann/CORBIS

Einstein said, “No problem can be solved from the same consciousness that created it.”
Facing a tough time at work?  A challenge in your marriage?
What got you there
          is not going to get you out of there. 
 
                 This isn’t just about changing your mind.
                          This is about a change of consciousness. 
If you do a  Google search for mind you’ll find:
“the element of a person that enables them to be aware of the world.”
Be aware. I love that. It’s not just accept this random thought that comes to me. My mind is precious, and I can gear it to be “aware of the world.”  That means being attuned to what is happening in my relationships, the interchanges, the dynamics.  It’s not just going through the motions to be a great coworker, wife or neighbor. It’s about being aware of the world around you, and giving accordingly.
Equally, mind can mean to:
  1. be distressed, annoyed, or worried by.
Wow. All of a sudden our mind becomes our enemy.  We let it get us worried. We react or come from fear.  And it’s not anything that made it be so, it’s just that our mind can become distressed/annoyed/worried, just because.
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Yet consciousness is different.  It’s the state of being awake and aware of one’s surroundings.”  And then it goes on to say that it’s “especially something within ourself.”
Now that’s different! That’s not just being aware, but also being awake. It means be alert to what your mind is telling you. And be awake to what is happening within yourself, or in other words, the still small voice.
So our mind can be positive or negative. Consciousness is the state of being awake to ourselves, to our world, and the people we affect.
So as Einstein says, “No problem can be solved from the same consciousness that created it.”
That means in whatever situation we are facing, we need to rise up to a new consciousness. A new way of thinking. A new approach!
And sometimes, that problem you think you have — isn’t even a problem!
Did you know Einstein loved to sail?  Most sailors know how to swim. Not Einstein. Apparently he didn’t swim, and didn’t think it was a problem!
So sometimes we need to take on a different consciousness. Don’t let your mind worry you. Einstein wasn’t letting his mind be worried about not being able to swim. His consciousness was “I am awake to the world! I want to be on the sea and experience the freedom, joy, mystique of nature!
His consciousness ruled, not his mind.  So can yours today.
Now imagine a world…. where our your mind is positive, and for the good. The dictionary of the public mind says it’s a “group  embodying mental qualities,” and consciousness is also “knowledge that is shared by a group of people.
In essence your thoughts don’t just affect you. They affect the world. Each thought contributes to a positive group mentality!  Adopt a positive consciousness today, and your life, and those are around you, will reflect that positivity.

Born on March 14, 1879 in Germany, Albert Einstein grew up in a secular Jewish family. His father, Hermann Einstein, was a salesman and engineer. Einstein attended elementary school in Munich. He felt alienated there and struggled with the rigid teaching style. Einstein had speech challenges, which forced him to find a passion in music. Einstein had a love for classical music and playing the violin, this love stayed with him throughout his entire life.  While attending school in Zurich, Einstein developed lasting friendships and alliances, also meeting his future wife, Mileva Maric, a Serbian physics student.
After graduating from Polytechnic, Einstein faced major challenges in terms of finding academic positions, it took him nine years to eventually find a job at a patent office. While working at the patent office, Einstein had the time to further ideas that had taken hold during his studies at Polytechnic and thus cemented his theorems on what would be known as the principle of relativity/ In 1905—seen by many as a “miracle year” for the theorist—Einstein had four papers published in the Annalen der Physik, one of the best known physics journals of the era. After many years of hard work and incredible scientific discoveries, Einstein suffered an abdominal aortic aneurysm. He was taken to the University Medical Center at Princeton for treatment but refused surgery, believing that he had lived his life and was content to accept his fate. “I want to go when I want,” he stated at the time. “It is tasteless to prolong life artificially. I have done my share, it is time to go. I will do it elegantly.” Einstein died at the university medical center early the next morning—April 18, 1955—at the age of 76.

FLASHBACK — To the Early VolunteerMatch Days

What it was like to start up a “high-tech nonprofit website”

This piece made my heart smile. It was in 2000 and someone asked me to speak about my role at “a high-tech nonprofit website.”  :)
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I’m so an excited about my role in a high-tech nonprofit web site. I have helped start VolunteerMatch nearly 4 years ago. Our mission is to match volunteers with nonprofits nationwide via our web site. To date we have matched more than 100,000 volunteers across the country. We have secured Internet partnership driving traffic to our site with top portals such as Infoseek, Snap! and AOL. Most recently we were announced on the Today Show and Oprah Winfrey Show as an excellent resource regarding volunteer opportunities.