Category Archives: Positivity, Goodness and Thoughts

The Classic Pamela Positive: Start By Listening

 

“My goal is to extract a design that emerges from the essence of the music rather than to decorate its story…   This process usually takes two to three months of immersing myself in the opera by listening to it 200 to 300 times.”

– Jun Kaneko

 

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Master designer Jun Kaneko provides the design for the San Francisco Opera’s production of The Magic Flute…and what a powerful way he envisages how to create this vision for us all. It’s synergistic, based on pulling all elements together and starting with one of the most important qualities… listening.

 

couple drinking coffee inside coffee shop

 

No matter your profession, you can be a good listener today. You might listen to the preschool kids you manage. You might listen to your elderly dog that would like a nice tummy rub. You might listen to your neighbor who asked you to trim the tree so it doesn’t hang over his property. Or you might create an amazing work of art such as Jun Kaneko through The Magic Flute. While his work seems supra-important, every person’s effort to listen is just as important.  

 

two man chatting white sitting on brown wooden chair

 

If we listened and did this for hours like Jun, everyone would be happy. Relationships with people would be lovely.

The World Can Be Lovely If We Will Just Listen,

Pamela

 


Jun Kaneko is a Japanese-American visual artist, with sculptures and other artwork in more than 50 museums. He has previously worked on opera productions for Madama Butterfly and Fidelio. His works in clay explore the effects of repeated abstract surface motifs. He was the Production Designer for the San Francisco Opera’s production of The Magic Flute, which opened in June 2012.

Kaneko is married to sculptor Ree Kaneko who is also an American artist, arts administrator, and art consultant from Omaha, Nebraska. The couple first met when Ree attended a workshop on Ceramic Sculpture with Tony Hepburn, held June 8–14, 1981, at the Omaha Brickworks. They have two daughters, Susan Schonlau and Troia Schonlau, from a prior marriage. Both daughters work at the Kankeo Studio

Bio Source: Wikipedia  Fig¹. Photo by Scott Drickey on ipa  Fig². Photo by Christin Hume on Unsplash  Fig³. Photo by  Juri Gianfrancesco on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: What To Do When You Don’t Know What To Do Next

 

What to do when you don’t know what to do next?

Have faith, then take another step.

 

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That’s how life works and soon you’ll reach your destination. So start walking, believing, and doing today!

Love,

Pamela

 


Fig¹.Photo by Quang Nguyen Vinh on Pexels

The Pamela Positive: “Go Instantly And Do The Thing” – Phillip Brooks

 

“If you could only know and see and feel, all of a sudden, that ‘the time is short,’ how it would break the spell. How you would go instantly and do the thing, which you might never have another chance to do!”

―Phillip Brooks

 

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There is no time to hesitate. Do you see a way that you can go good? Then we must do it now.

Slow down to help someone across the street.

I know it’s hard, but let someone in front of you on the highway.

Smile to someone who is waiting at the bus stop.

Save part of your dinner and bring it over to your neighbor, unexpectedly.

Be warm, be kind, even when you feel stressed.

 

Soldier Giving Red Fruit on 2 Children during Daytime

 

Time to do good now. You will find a way. Look and the opportunities abound to give back, give forward, give all around.  

Give Where We Can Today,

Pamela

 


Phillips Brooks (December 13, 1835 – January 23, 1893) was an American Episcopal clergyman and author, long the Rector of Boston’s Trinity Church and briefly Bishop of Massachusetts, and particularly remembered as the lyricist of the Christmas hymn, O Little Town of Bethlehem.

Born in Boston, Brooks was descended through his father, William Gray Brooks, from the Rev. John Cotton; through his mother, Mary Ann Phillips, he was a great-grandson of Samuel Phillips, Jr., founder of Phillips Academy (Andover, Massachusetts). Three of Brooks’ five brothers – Frederic, Arthur and John Cotton – were eventually ordained in the Episcopal Church. Phillips Brooks prepared for college at the Boston Latin School and graduated from Harvard University in 1855 at the age of 20, where he was elected to the A.D. Club. He worked briefly as a school teacher at Boston Latin.

During the American Civil War, he upheld the cause of the North and opposed slavery, and his sermon on the death of Abraham Lincoln was an eloquent expression of the character of both men. His sermon at Harvard’s commemoration of the Civil War dead in 1865 likewise attracted attention nationwide. Brooks’s understanding of individuals and of other religious traditions gained a following across a broad segment of society, as well as increased support for the Episcopal Church. Within his lifetime, he received honorary degrees from Harvard (1877) and Columbia (1887), and the Doctor of Divinity degree by the University of Oxford, England (1885).

Bio Source: Wikipedia  Fig¹. Photo by Juliano Ferreira on Pexels  Fig². Photo by Pixabay on Pexels

The Classic Pamela Positive: A Solution To Any Relationship Problem

 

“You can have no conflict without being yourselves the aggressors… Though passion may have strained it must not break our bonds of affection.”

― Abraham Lincoln

 

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No matter how we feel we have been wronged, let’s follow Lincoln’s wise advice.

At a minimum, we can pause before we take action.

We slow down to determine the right pathway.

 

woman walking along pathway during daytime

 

Even if we take a stance for what is right, we must come not from a space of ourselves being right.

Taking action simply because we are right does not serve the end. Taking action because we feel wronged most certainly doesn’t.

It wins no battles. Your opponent, who is indeed your friend, will not feel heard, respected, even loved.

 

Man And Woman Wearing Brown Leather Jackets

 

We must step back and come from a space of calm and centeredness, expecting the best for both parties. Then, listening as to what that next step should be, we will be led. Your response, then, is not a reaction; it is thoughtful. It is not ever in retaliation, for no law endorses it. It is of pure motive, as Abraham Lincoln speaks to “the better angels of our nature.”

 

Two Women Sitting on Ground Near Bonfire

 

It does not matter if you are in politics, business, a personal relationship, in a family. It all applies. It’s a law of nature that allows us to keep that “Union” that Abraham Lincoln fought so dearly for, for our country. Thus by his example and success, we too can take a stand to preserve the union of any relationship in our lives.

 


Abraham Lincoln served as the 16th President of the United States, during the Civil War.  He is regarded as one of America’s greatest heroes due to his role as savior of the Union and emancipator of slaves. His rise from humble beginnings to achieving the highest office in the land is a remarkable story. His eloquent support of democracy and insistence that the Union was worth saving embody the ideals of self-government that all nations strive to achieve. Lincoln’s distinctively humane personality and incredible impact on the nation have endowed him with an enduring legacy. He is also known for his humble background, self-education, and skill with writing and rhetoric.  He was not a member of any one organized religion, but he frequently used Biblical imagery and references in his writing and speaking, and referenced a Providence who had a higher purpose. Lincoln married Mary Todd on November 4, 1842, at her sister Elizabeth’s home in Springfield, Illinois. She was 23 years old and he was 33 years of age. They had four sons, all born in Springfield.

Bio Source: Wikipedia, BIOGRAPHY  Fig¹.  Photo by Library of Congress on Unsplash  Fig². Photo by Alexander Ramsey on Unsplash  Fig³. Photo by Vera Arsic on Pexels  Fig⁴. Photo by VisionPic .net on Pexels

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: Start By Listening

 

“My goal is to extract a design that emerges from the essence of the music rather than to decorate its story…   This process usually takes two to three months of immersing myself in the opera by listening to it 200 to 300 times.”

– Jun Kaneko

 

8-110273-16_IPA_20150508_sd_5863-Edit-Edit-Edit.jpg

 

Master designer Jun Kaneko provides the design for the San Francisco Opera’s production of The Magic Flute…and what a powerful way he envisages how to create this vision for us all. It’s synergistic, based on pulling all elements together and starting with one of the most important qualities… listening.

 

couple drinking coffee inside coffee shop

 

No matter your profession, you can be a good listener today. You might listen to the preschool kids you manage. You might listen to your elderly dog that would like a nice tummy rub. You might listen to your neighbor who asked you to trim the tree so it doesn’t hang over his property. Or you might create an amazing work of art such as Jun Kaneko through The Magic Flute. While his work seems supra-important, every person’s effort to listen is just as important.  

 

two man chatting white sitting on brown wooden chair

 

If we listened and did this for hours like Jun, everyone would be happy. Relationships with people would be lovely.

The World Can Be Lovely If We Will Just Listen,

Pamela


Jun Kaneko is a Japanese-American visual artist, with sculptures and other artwork in more than 50 museums. He has previously worked on opera productions for Madama Butterfly and Fidelio. His works in clay explore the effects of repeated abstract surface motifs. He was the Production Designer for the San Francisco Opera’s production of The Magic Flute, which opened in June 2012.

Kaneko is married to sculptor Ree Kaneko who is also an American artist, arts administrator, and art consultant from Omaha, Nebraska. The couple first met when Ree attended a workshop on Ceramic Sculpture with Tony Hepburn, held June 8–14, 1981, at the Omaha Brickworks. They have two daughters, Susan Schonlau and Troia Schonlau, from a prior marriage. Both daughters work at the Kankeo Studio

Bio Source: Wikipedia  Fig¹. Photo by Scott Drickey on ipa  Fig². Photo by Christin Hume on Unsplash  Fig³. Photo by  Juri Gianfrancesco on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “When You’re At The Table, You’re Open And Your Defenses Are Down”

 

“People want that gathering together. The table is magical. When you’re at the table, you’re open and your defenses are down.”

―Lidia Bastianich
American Chef and TV Host

 

Mealtimes seem to be a time of the past. We eat in our cars and desks or even holding a power bar walking out the door…

 

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Yet, Lidia points out how we can find deep caring and nourishment at the table. It’s not just sharing food, but also sharing of our hearts and feelings.

It’s a time to be a sounding board and to have sounding boards…from people who truly care about you. It’s a time to relax, and yet also profound as some of the most important issues in your life may come out in a casual way.

 

Two Women And One Man Eating

 

Don’t miss this time with your loved ones. “The table is magical.”  Or I might add  “The people at the table are magical.”

You’re Magical,

Pamela

 


Lidia Matticchio Bastianich (born on February 21, 1947, in Pula, Croatia–then a part of Italy), is an American chef, television host, author, and restaurateur. Specializing in Italian and Italian-American cuisine, Lidia has been a regular contributor to public television cooking show lineups since 1998. In 2011, she launched her fourth TV series Lidia’s Italy in America. She also owns several Italian restaurants in the U.S. in partnership with her daughter Tanya Bastianich Manuali and her son, Joe Bastianich, including Felidia (founded with her ex-husband, Felice), Del Posto, Esca, and Becco in Manhattan; Lidia’s Pittsburgh in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; and Lidia’s Kansas City in Kansas City, Missouri.

Bio Source: Wikipedia  Fig¹. Photo by The Creative Exchange on Unsplash  FIg². Photo by mentatdgt on Pexels

The Classic Pamela Positive: “I Am Here for a Purpose and That Purpose Is to Grow into a Mountain.” – Og Mandino

 

 

“I am here for a purpose and that purpose is to grow into a mountain, not to shrink to a grain of sand. Henceforth will I apply all my efforts to become the highest mountain of all and I will strain my potential until it cries for mercy.”

– Og Mandino

 

 

aerial view photography of mountains under cloudy sky

 

 


Og Mandino (1923-1996) is a well-known author.  His bestselling book, The Greatest Salesman in the World, sold more than 50 million copies.  His book was translated into 25 different languages. In addition, he served as the president of Success Unlimited Magazine, and was inducted into the National Speakers Association’s Hall Of Fame.

He was married to Bette Mandino for nearly forty years, and he described her as having “a lot more faith in me than I had in myself.”

Biosource: Wikipedia, ogmandino.com


Citation:

Fig¹. Simon Fitall on Unsplash