Category Archives: Industry Inspiration

“Inspirational” Goal: become a thought leader PH’s perceptions of NGO partner specific

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Do All the Good You Can” —John Wesley

 

“Do all the good you can
By all the means you can
In all the ways you can
In all the places you can
At all the times you can
To all the people you can
As long as ever you can.”
—John Wesley

 

 

 

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John Wesley (1703-1791) was the founder of the Methodist movement, along with his brother Charles. Wesley went to Christ Church College, Oxford, and taught at Oxford’s Lincoln College.  He preached in Georgia, and throughout England, giving over 40,000 sermons in his lifetime.  One of Wesley’s best-known doctrines is that of “salvation by faith.”  He also emphasized striving for “Christian Perfection,” where the believer lived by the love of God.  He was engaged with social issues such as prison reform and the abolitionist movement.  Methodism is now considered a separate denomination of Christianity, although in Wesley’s lifetime it was within the Anglican church.  At the time of Wesley’s death, there were 135,000 Methodists; today, they number some 70 million.

GET OFF THIS

 

It seems harmless. Check a photo. Post a photo. See what others are up to. What could be wrong with that?

 

 

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Yet according to Tech Crunch, a new study tested a regular social media group and one limited to 1o minutes per day.

 

 

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The limited 10-minute group shows less depression, anxiety.1

It shows more stable mental health and social support. What’s going on?

 

 

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People actually need to spend time together.

They do! We do! We all do.

 

 

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The American Psychological Association stated that nearly 40% of Americans up their time with people and social events to combat stress.2 Further, time with family can alleviate stress. In a nearly 10-year study at Yale and Berkeley, people who didn’t have a social fabric died three times more during those years, than someone who had family and close friends.3 And even those who don’t have the greatest or healthiest lifestyle — even they last longer when they have friends, family, 

social integration in meaningful ways.4

 

 

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According to Psychology Today, positive mental health increases with these ties. Depression, anxiety, go down.5    

Positive uplift, positive affect, take place. You are a better you, even if you aren’t taking care of you!    

 

 

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So connect today. Get off the metal and get in front of people. Start living a more positive life!

Connecting in person,

Pamela


 

Citations:
1 Coldewey, Devin, “Limiting social media use reduced loneliness and depression in new experiment”, Tech Crunch, November 9, 2018,https://techcrunch.com/2018/11/09/limiting-social-media-use-reduced-loneliness-and-depression-in-new-experiment/
2 Guest Contributor, “Most Effective Stress Relievers”, Forbes, November 3, 2009, https://www.forbes.com/2009/11/02/stress-relief-tips-lifestyle-health-stress.html#7095b16e357a
3 Berkman, Lisa F. and Syme, S. Leonard, “Social Networks, Host Resistance and Mortality: A Nine-Year Follow-Up Study of Alameda County Residents”, American Journal of Epidemiology, Vol. 109, No. 2, pages 186-204
4 Brody, Jane E., “Social Interaction is Critical for Mental and Physical Health, The New York Times, June 12, 2017, https://www.nytimes.com/2017/06/12/well/live/having-friends-is-good-for-you.html
5 Bergland, Christopher, “Face-to-Face Social Contact Reduces Risk of Depression”, Psychology Today, October 5, 2015, https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/the-athletes-way/201510/face-face-social-contact-reduces-risk-depression
Fig. 1: Photo by Georgia de Lotz on Unsplash
Fig. 2: Photo by Jenz Johnsson on Unsplash
Fig. 3: Photo by Felix Rostig on Unsplash
Fig. 4: Photo by Phil Coffman on Unsplash
Fig. 5: Photo by Anthony Tran on Unsplash

 

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Do the best you can, and don’t take life too serious.” —Will Rogers

 

“Do the best you can, and don’t take life too serious.”

-Will Rogers

 

 

 

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This is great advice — and a tough one. Strive for excellence — then let go.  Excel, but relax. Be a go-getter, but laugh. One can think it is confusing!

Yet even the greatest Olympic ice skater, the president of the U.N., and your awesome mom need “a break from excellence.” Just a little time to breathe, reflect, enjoy life, live.

 

 

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Why? Because then they can go back to excellence. They’ve rejuvenated, recharged, and “re-become” themselves. Did you know that 53% of people in the U.S. are considered “burnout”?  And 48% percent in San Francisco and 52% percent in New York. What is burnout? It is a state of physical, emotional, and/or emotional exhaustion experienced at work.

 

 

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So let the superstar in your life go for it and let go. They deserve it. And so do you!

 

 

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William Penn Adair Rogers was born on November 4, 1879, in present-day Oologah, Oklahoma. Rogers grew up in a ranching family. In 1905, Rogers began performing a lasso act on the vaudeville circuit. His charm and humor, along with his technical ability, made Rogers a star. Audiences responded with enthusiasm to his off-the-cuff remarks delivered while performing elaborate roping tricks. Rogers parlayed his vaudeville success into a Broadway career. He debuted in New York in 1916, performing in The Wall Street Girl. This led to many more theatrical roles, including headlining appearances in the Ziegfeld Follies. In addition to acting, Rogers became nationally known as a writer. He penned a column for the Saturday Evening Post in newspapers. His columns dealt with contemporary issues from a perspective of small town morality, emphasizing the integrity of working people.

Rogers’s fame had eclipsed his country bumpkin persona by 1930. No longer believable as an uneducated outsider, he was able to voice his characteristic wit and wisdom while playing a professional. Legendary director John Ford worked with Rogers on three of these later films—Doctor Bull, Judge Priest and The Steamboat Round the Bend. On August 15, 1935, the plane carrying Will Rogers crashed in Point Barrow, Alaska. He died on impact. Millions across the country mourned the sudden silencing of a quintessentially American voice.

The Classic Pamela Positive: What Motivates?

 

I had an hour and a half long conversation with a Dukie the other day, who pushed me to answer new questions! I love those conversations as they are so real and help us become better people, teachers, and learners.

Sinclair’s question was,

 

“You have a certain energy that inspires and drives people to action. How do you cultivate it, and how do you maintain it?”

 

 

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I don’t think there’s any surefire answer here. But here’s what I said:

“Dear Sinclair,

What a lovely question to ask, and one that is important for all of us. First, I will say that I find you equally motivating. It’s just that we have different personalities. For example, I might be more enthusiastically inspired, but you are more quietly and grounded inspired. Thus we are drawn together, as I might bring a higher energy and you bring a special stillness. Does that make sense?”

Sinclair, there are many different types of leadership. Just because someone seems more extroverted and external with it, doesn’t mean that’s the only type of leadership. Leadership can be about quietness, about listening, and even about knowing when to pause. To be a great leader, you need to master all communication skills, which include when to speak, how to speak, what the tone is, and when not to speak. It also includes body language, and most importantly, it includes your inner values and soul.

“So how then do you stay authentic with who you are?”

The words authenticity and transparency comes up a lot these days, and I appreciate it. As we become more oriented around machines, computers, iPads, phones, and the social media explosion of Vine, no Vine, Instagram, Snapchat—it disappears, Pinterest—Facebook—Twitter—former Friendster; it becomes very confusing. Our identities need to be aligned. So here’s what I do, and it’s a constant quest every day. Leadership isn’t something you attain and let go. Leadership is something you believe in, live, and maintain. That’s what makes life so exciting!

Remember these tips are only from me. You might find that other people have a different view. In order to stay authentic, I keep my priorities very clear. I know that my life calling is to be the best Pamela Hawley I can be, not just to deliver the best UniversalGiving. Therefore, I have to take a higher view than just my profession, my job, or even a calling. Even with a calling, you still have to put your identity and your values first. So how do I do that? First, you need to know that UniversalGiving comes third in my life. Yes, that’s right. As much as I love it, as much as it is my calling and not a job, it comes third in my life. So I’m going to be pretty naked here, and let you know how my life works.

 

 

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Priorities:

#1. God, Love, and/or Nature

I believe in a governing force of good for our universe. That means our universe is run based on certain principles that are loving, kind, and filled with integrity. Some people call that God, some people call it Love (it’s not just human love), and some people may relate to it as nature. The point is that there is a law of options going on in the universe that allows for the greatest good to occur. It’s our job to hook into it, work with it, and accelerate as much good as we can in our lifetimes. That will then pass onto others and reflect the true goodness that exists in this universe.

 

 

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Our foundation of the world and ourselves is based on goodness, and we need to pay more attention to that, rather than all of the nuisances, annoyances, negative suggestions, negative thoughts, and challenging interactions we have with personalities. You can make that a huge part of reality or you can go back to your view of a loving universe, and make that your focus. So you have to train your mind and heart, in God or Love, every day, every moment.

 

#2. Family (…and Friends)

Family is absolutely essential. It’s where we attain a sense of peace, grounding, and comfort. I know for myself, I grew up with a mom who baked me chocolate chip cookies, sat with me after school in second grade, and listened to me. We did workbooks together, we talked about life, and I felt she was always there for me. To this day, if I call her, ninety percent of the time she picks up the phone; she’s present. She’s family, and she’s my grounding, as are many other members of my family.

 

 

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Family extends into many areas. For example, with my nephews and nieces, I was fortunate enough to take care of them many Saturday nights when they were growing up. I got them at the “meltdown” phase at around 3 o’clock and spent the night. I learned a lot! I bonded with them in ways I cannot even imagine. Today? I just called Connor, my 17-year-old nephew, to congratulate him on his soccer game. Maybe not so many teenagers would pick up their aunt’s call, but he does, and we have a conversation even if he’s in the middle of building a creative project for school. We just have that connection.

I really don’t see the point in life of being this major “success” if you don’t have that family to share it with. A family to inspire you, a family that you inspire. And with that, there’s a sense of peace. You know where you come from, you know what your values are, and when the world gets too heavy, you can go home to that values, whether that’s in a physical structure, or in your heart. It’s irreplaceable.

 

 

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Equally important are friends. Those friends are absolutely a part of your family network. I have friends with whom I have standing weekly or monthly meetings. For example, my “second moms” are women who were a very important part of my life growing up. I have monthly or quarterly lunches set up with them. I don’t want to take them for granted and just see them at the holiday party. I want to know how they are, hear how they are, and support them as they have supported me. It’s a true, ongoing relationship rather than a once-a-year fond remembrance.

 

 

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#3. UniversalGiving

I don’t have a job—I have a calling! Every day I get up, I love what I do. I love being a social entrepreneur, and I love serving the world. I love volunteering, and I love helping scale the fact that thousands of other people can volunteer. So for me, it’s just a constant flow of doing good for the world, and helping my team do that, as well as reach their best. In summary, UniversalGiving helps people donate and volunteer in hundreds of countries across the world.

 

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Within that, I also rope in my volunteer events. I’m a consistent volunteer at City Impact, helping in the Tenderloin with everything from passing out food, doing apartment visits, to preparing Thanksgiving meals. I’m also a C.A.S.A., a Court-Appointed Special Advocate, which is a legal advocate for foster care youth who are often on the street. You work with them on a weekly, and sometimes daily basis to make sure they have food, housing, a listening ear, eyeglasses, job training, and whatever they might need. Many of them have had little or no training or modeling their entire life, so a lot of what you do also works on just helping them with social skills, and teaching them how to survive in the world.

 

#4. Improv

How I love improv! And you might think, “Well, how does this tie into the rest?” Improv is an incredible joy. It allows you to connect with your fellow actors on stage, and to be a true partner.

 

 

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It requires great creativity and quick thinking. It equally requires great listening and taking the back seat. It’s about sharing.

It’s about building. It’s about creating a scene from nothing. And in order to do that, you have to have absolute trust with your partner.

And isn’t that what life is? Sometimes you have to respond immediately, you always have to listen, and you need to be a great friend or partner in life—whether that’s in business, a marriage, or a friendship. So it actually synergizes. But even if it doesn’t, it’s so much fun! You should have things like that in your life, that seem opposite to everything else you do. As my oma, one of the greatest flutists in our generation, and the first woman at Juilliard for flute said, “You need to get out there and kick up your heels once in awhile!” She was an extremely hard-worker and helped support her family during the depression. Her point was, get out there and dance. Get out there and have fun. Work hard and yet, live a little.

 

 

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So, Sinclair, I’m not sure this fully answered your question, but this is how I try to maintain my true self and identity in life. Thank you for asking such an important question, and I hope this helps you in your journey!

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Water and Wisdom Come Through — Not From — Your Brain” —Dan Millman

 

“Like water, higher wisdom doesn’t come as much from your brain as through it.  All you have to do is to listen and trust.”

Dan Millman, The Laws of Spirit

 

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I love this sincere quote from inspirational author Dan Millman.  It’s about trusting what already is available to us all: a Divine Inspiration that guides every moment.

You don’t have to be intellectual, smart or have high education to receive it. No, true wisdom is from the heart, from principles of goodness. It’s about being led to do the right thing.

True wisdom comes naturally.  We don’t have to think through it, manufacture it.

Let’s embrace Wisdom today.   We can live purity of right motive and action, every moment.

 

 

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Dan Millman began his career in the athletic arena.  He competed in gymnastics and trampoline in high school and college, winning international acclaim.  He became gymnastics director at Stanford University in 1968, and in 1972 moved to Oberlin College. He began writing in the 1980s, on diverse topics including fitness and philosophy.  His writing and motivational speaking tends to focus on achieving one’s potential. In 2006, his book Way of the Peaceful Warrior was adapted into a film, Peaceful Warrior.  He is married to Joy Millman, and they have three daughters and two grandchildren.

The Classic Pamela Positive: The “Big H”: The Unfailing Recipe for Happiness

 

We search. We search for the “Big H,” happiness, all the time. 

 

 

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We try to find our right calling.  Our right partner in life. The right home, city, school.  And yet…

Happiness is about sharing. 

 

 

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It’s about experiences, time, thoughts and caring for others — which are all spiritual. And I can’t imagine many people expressing their happiest times not in the presence of someone else. It’s being with others, and being with them in a meaningful way. We also know that it is not necessarily even doing something; it could just be sharing one another’s presence, with each other…

So I love, then, Archbishop Desmond Tutu’s wisdom on the recipe for happiness:

“Serve others.
The unfailing recipe for happiness and success is to want the good of others. Happiness and success is when I see others happy.
Happiness is a shared thing.”

 


 

 

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Archbishop Desmond Tutu is a Christian cleric known for his work for human rights.  Active in South Africa, he was an important opponent of apartheid. Other causes he has worked on include fighting AIDs, homophobia, tuberculosis, racism and poverty.  Nelson Mandela described him as “the voice of the voiceless.”  Tutu received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1984, the Albert Schweitzer Prize for Humanitarianism in 1986, the Gandhi Peace Prize in 2005, and the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2009.

The Classic Pamela Positive: “There is a place for every star, and they all blend together.” —Alexandra Hawley

“There is a place for every star, and they all blend together.”

—Alexandra Hawley

 

 

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This is a lovely quote from my mom, which was simply a part of an email to me.  I love the analogy of stars, for they all shine, and all uniquely so;  each one has its enduring place.  The light of each star is their unique, special contribution to this world. 

Here is where the star power comes in. With each star’s combined light, we create a greater luminescence which brightens everyone’s experience, and therefore the world.

 

 

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Thank you, Mom, for seeing the star in everyone!