Monthly Archives: November 2019

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Love Is Not Love Until Love’s Vulnerable” – Wisdom Inside a Chocolate Wrapper

 

“Love is not love until love’s vulnerable.” 

The Dream by Theodore Roethke,

as found on the inside of a Trader Joe’s chocolate bar wrapper

 

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Yes, wisdom can come in chocolate! Well, being vulnerable is important.  We show we care, show we want to learn, and grow in love. We love the other person more and we love ourselves more.

Be Vulnerable, Grow, Love!

Pamela


Theodore Roethke (1908-1963) was an American poet who won the Pulitzer Prize for poetry, for his book The Waking. His other best-known books include The Lost Son, The Far Field, and Words for the Wind. His poetry is noted for its rhythm, imagery and focus on nature.  He grew up in Saginaw, Michigan and his father was a German immigrant.  He received his B.A. and M.A. from the University of Michigan for English.  He went on to graduate school at Harvard College before he would leave to teach English at a number of universities. In 1953, Roethke married a former student, Beatrice O’Connell. Roethke is widely considered to be one of the most accomplished and influential poets of his time.  He taught poetry at the University of Washington for many years and was highly regarded by his colleagues and students.

Bio Source: Wikipedia  Fig¹. Photo by amirali mirhashemian on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: What Love Is

 

What Love Is.

 

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It’s the warmth of your eyes.

It’s the feeling in your heart.

It’s the slowing down to care.

 

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It’s connecting.

It’s giving.

And you can do it right now. Go reach out to someone and give them your love.

Love Today,

Pamela


Fig¹. Photo by Roman Kraf  Fig². Photo by Ryan Holloway on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: Celebrate True Wealth

 

Wealth is a state of mind and life. We tend to associate poverty with money. But poverty can be mental, emotional or Spiritual Poverty. I am often struck by this in my travel and volunteering in developing nations. Often, the divorce rates are low. Families not only stay together, but also spend time together. They gather food from the fields together, cook together and share meals together.

 

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Contrast us: 15 minute family dinners if we are lucky. Fast-food and food distanced from its natural base. We eat alone; we eat in our cars. Divorces are easier to get, and in our mind it can be easier to allow those thoughts in as a possibility, rather than work through critical issues. So we lose the connection to family. We lose the connection to the local farm. We can lose the connection to long-term commitment.

 

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We lose our greatest asset in natural wealth: relationships. Relationships with ourselves, our families, the earth. This wealth creates happy, balanced, productive, lower stress lifestyles, because we are connected in the way we are meant to be.

Further, we often pass by our heritage and where we come from. In many emerging nations, and especially in the continent of Africa, we see tribes value their connection to their heritage as primary importance even above their nationality. There is a deep-rooted connection to rituals and history which keeps people grounded in who they are, and the deeper, long-term meaning of being a part of a larger community in their lives.

 

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Poverty is about money, at times. It has to be addressed as people should have the opportunity to live productive lives and make choices about what they would like to devote their lives to. Poverty is also about our well-being. Often when we get beyond “money poverty,” we forget “well-being poverty,” and get trapped in a go-go-go consumer culture.

 

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I hope we can celebrate the healthy wealth that is accessible to us all in positive, committed relationships with ourselves, one another, our families, our earth, our communities and our heritage. How wonderful this is available to us all.


Fig. 1: Photo by Lee Myungseon on Unsplash  Fig. 2: Photo by Sai De Silva on Usnplash
Fig. 3: Photo by Ramdan Authentic on Unsplash  Fig. 4: Photo by Tyler Nix on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: Be Prepared to Be Kind

 

Be Prepared. That’s the motto of the Girl Scouts and Boy Scouts.

When you think about it, being prepared is not just for wilderness trips. And while being prepared often means having savings, storing water for an earthquake or natural disaster, and keeping a flashlight in your car, it also means being prepared qualitatively. It’s about being prepared to react with positive qualities, in your day to day life.

 

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It’s all about what you hold, store and prepare within yourself.

So be prepared to be kind.

Some days you may not receive pleasant news. Will you react in anger, distrust, sadness, gloom? Or will you respond with patience, a willingness to see all sides and the realization that all things are truly working towards a greater good?

 

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Set yourself to react kindly. That means both to yourself and others. Don’t come down hard on yourself; don’t come down hard on others. Be understanding.

Be prepared to be kind. It’s the ultimate preparation.

 


Girl Scouts: Girl Scouts of the USA is the world’s preeminent organization dedicated solely to girls—all girls—where, in an accepting and nurturing environment, girls build character and skills for success in the real world. In partnership with committed adult volunteers, girls develop qualities that will serve them all their lives, like leadership, strong values, social conscience, and conviction about their own potential and self-worth.

Boy Scouts: The Boy Scouts of America is one of the nation’s largest and most prominent values-based youth development organizations. The BSA provides a program for young people that builds character, trains them in the responsibilities of participating citizenship, and develops personal fitness.

Bio Source: Girl Scouts, Boy Scouts of America  Fig¹. Kevia Tan on Unsplash  Fig². Hian Oliveira on Unsplash  

The Classic Pamela Positive: “We’re All Just Walking Each Other Home” – Ram Dass

 

“We’re all just walking each other home.”

- Ram Dass

 

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What a lovely, gentle way of helping, companioning, loving each other on the journey on the way home…. or to anywhere. Where can you be a kind companion? Where can you help someone?   Walk them home, walk them to work, walk them with love… anywhere.

We don’t walk alone in this world. Walk someone home today, with love.

I Am Walking with You,

Pamela


Ram Dass (born Richard Alpert; April 6, 1931) is an American contemporary spiritual teacher and the author of the seminal 1971 book Be Here Now. He is known for his personal and professional associations with Timothy Leary at Harvard University in the early 1960s, for his travels to India and his relationship with the Hindu guru Neem Karoli Baba, and for founding the charitable organizations Seva Foundation and Hanuman Foundation.

During his psychedelic research, Ram Dass traveled to India in 1967 and met his guru, Neem Karoli Baba, affectionately known as Maharajji, who gave Ram Dass his name, which means “servant of God.”  Since 1968, Ram Dass has pursued a panoramic array of spiritual methods and practices from potent ancient wisdom traditions. He has also practiced karma yoga or spiritual service, which opened up many other souls to their deep yet individuated spiritual practice and path. His unique skill in getting people to cut through and feel divine love without dogma is still a positive influence on many people from all over the planet. He now resides on Maui, where he shares his teachings through the internet and through retreats on Maui. His work continues to be a path of inspiration to his old students and friends as well as young people and newcomers.

Bio Sources: Wikipedia, RamDass.org  Fig¹. Brett Jordan on Unsplash