Monthly Archives: September 2019

The Classic Pamela Positive: “It Is the Open-Mindedness to Little Things That Brings Human Success.” -Russell Conwell

 

“It is the open-mindedness to little things that brings human success.”

—Russell Conwell

 

What a wonderful story which shows how we can all be resourceful. We can figure out a different way to achieve even our smallest needs, and maintain a positive outlook. Look up, look around, and use what you see!

It’s there for us all… It’s already been provided.

 

man in gray hoodie with black backpack looking at the city from mountain peek

 

I said to a relative of mine, who was a professor at Harvard:
“I was cold all the time I was there, and I shivered so that my teeth shook”.
Said he: “Why did you shiver?”
“Because it was cold.”

“No, that is not the reason you shivered.”
Then I said: “I shivered because I had not bed-clothes enough.”
“No, that is not the reason.”

“Well,” said I, “Professor, you are a scientific man. I am not. I would like to have an expert, scientific opinion now, why I shivered.”

He arose in his own way and said:
“Young man, you shivered because you did not know any better! Didn’t you have in your pocket a newspaper?”
“Oh, yes, I had a “Herald” and a “Journal”.

“That is it. You had them in your pocket, and if you had spread one newspaper over your sheet when you went to bed, you would have been as warm as you lay there, as the richest man in America under all his silk coverlids.

But you shivered because you didn’t know enough to put a two-cent newspaper on your bed, and you had it in your pocket.”

 

opened book beside crystal ball

 

It is the open-mindedness to little things that brings human success.

 


Russell Conwell (February 15, 1843 December 6, 1925) was an American Baptist minister, orator, philanthropist, lawyer, and writer. He is best remembered as the founder and first president of Temple University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and for his inspirational lecture Acres of Diamonds. The son of Massachusetts farmers, Conwell attended Yale University and after graduating enlisted in the Union Army during the American Civil War. He was ordained as a Baptist minister in 1880, and delivered his famous speech Acres of Diamondsover 6,000 times around the world. The central idea of the work is that one need not look elsewhere for opportunity, achievement, or fortune the resources to achieve all good things are present in ones own community. Conwells capacity to establish Temple University and his other civic projects largely derived from the income that he earned from the speech. The published version has been regarded as a classic of New Thought literature since the 1870s.

Bio Source: Wikipedia


Fig¹.  Photo by Eréndira Tovar on Unsplash

Fig².  Photo by Dollar Gill on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: Keep Your Balance

 

I think one key point in life is to maintain balance — balance between time for work, time for loved ones, time for oneself, time for interests outside of one’s business. It’s so important to keep that balance, or we’ll simply burn-out.

 

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I remember once when I was young in my career, and meeting with a fairly older, single woman. She was a successful venture capitalist. But I don’t know that I would consider her life successful. She traveled the world incessantly and was on every important board. But she seemed tired and joy was scarce. She told me to “Pack it all in.”

I didn’t. I kept my balance. I started a nonprofit and I did creative improv. I took care of my very young nephews and nieces. I loved life and I loved the people in my life.

 

woman kissing baby wearing gray onesie

 

We need to be renewed. We need to feel honored as whole, functioning people with families, outside interests, balanced lives, as well as our commitment to achieving the goals and vision of the organizations we run. The beauty of this balance is that I come back energized to UniversalGiving®. My mind has had “time off” and is thrilled to re-engage with our efforts to serve. I look at challenges in a new light. My energy is renewed. I bring new skills to the table; my thoughts are stronger and more helpful. It’s better for me-and for my organization.

Keeping Balanced for Me, for You and Our Way of Giving Back to the World,

Pamela

 


Fig¹.  Photo by Aziz Acharki on Unsplash

Fig².  Photo by Vincent Delegge on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “You Have To Get People Talking The Same Language Before You Get Them Around The Table.” – Pakzan Dastoor

 

“You have to get people talking the same language before you get them around the table. ”

– Pakzan Dastoor

 

What a wonderful insight from the Dasra Foundation!

Dasra is an innovative foundation working on extreme social change in India.  I just heard them speak at an amazing conference at Stanford focusing on Indian philanthropy. Local Indians and Silicon Valley Indian entrepreneurs gathered together to discuss how to give intelligently.

 

2 Person Holding Hands

 

Dasra’s strategic approach to social problems has dramatically increased the impact and scale of social change in India. They helped take nearly 1000 nonprofits and socially conscious businesses to the next level. They have more than 28 research reports ranging from adolescent girls’ empowerment to child malnutrition and sports for development.

And Pakzan is right. The Advisory Leader of Dasra knows that we need to collaborate, listen, and support one another in order to achieve true success.

So the “right language” is not really about a dialect.  It’s about our motivations.

Before we come to the table, we need to be on the same page.   That means our motives and aspirations are aligned.   Then we are really listening!  And the conversation builds to higher levels to serve the world, our communities and our partnerships.

Are you facing a challenge in philanthropy today? Or how about your own life?

We can take Pakzan’s advice. Let’s slow down. We can make sure we are listening.   Are we speaking the same language? You might both be speaking Hindi. But if you don’t have the same values, your words will blow right one another.

To truly scale we must have the same values. 

We can be great social innovators, communicators and doers by speaking the same language: Listen, love and support your partner.

 


As India’s leading strategic philanthropy foundation, Dasra actively shapes the process of social change by forming powerful partnerships with funders and social enterprises. In the past 15 years, Dasra has been working towards building a ‘thriving ecosystem’ that enables knowledge creation, capacity building, strategic funding, and collaboration in order to touch and transform the lives of 800 million Indians.

Bio Source: Dasra Official Website, https://www.dasra.org/


Fig¹.  Photo by Pixabay on Pexels

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Your Daily Life Is Your Temple And Your Religion. When You Enter Into It Take With You Your All.” – Khalil Gibran

 

Every day we have a chance to give our all. It’s not always the big presentation or the graduation day, however. It’s not always the first day on the job, the day we get married, have a promotion or have a child!

Khalil Gibran is saying,

 

“Today is filled with opportunity to do good, and to be your best self.”

 

So how can we do that?

 

white mosque on daytime

 

It can be in how you treat your co-workers. It can be how you enter a room. It can be a simple smile as you pass someone in the hallway. It can even be in how you say “Good morning”!

Gibran encourages us that the legacy we are leaving as individuals starts today. It’s not something that shows up 60 or 70 years later down the road. Legacy and your temple of living begins now.

So start building your temple. It’s in how you greet each person, help each person, in every activity, every day. That’s a calling!

Love To You Today As You Build Your Special Temple,

Pamela


Khalil Gibran was born on January 6, 1883, in Bsharri, Lebanon. He immigrated with his mother and siblings to Boston in 1895 – his father remained in Lebanon to address financial matters. Gibran would return to Lebanon three years later to continue his education but returned to America after illness took the life of one of his sisters. He met Mary Haskell who encouraged his artistic development. During his life, Gibran was a prolific artist who created hundreds of paintings and drawings. In 1920, he was a co-founder, along with other poets of Arab and Lebanese backgrounds, of The Pen-bond Society, a literary society, also known as Al Rabitat al Qualamiya. Gibran’s works, written in both Arabic and English, are full of lyrical outpourings and express his deeply religious and mystical nature. The Prophet (1923), a book of poetic essays, achieved cult status among American youth for several generations. In 1928, he published Jesus, the Son of Man. Gibran died in New York City on April 10, 1931.

Bio Source: Wikipedia


Fig¹.  Photo by Rohan Iyer on Unsplash

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: “The Best Way Out Is Always Through” – Robert Frost

 

“The best way out is always through.”

― Robert Frost

 

Image result for Robert Frost

 

Our dear Poet has practical advice for us…. we must take a step forward. You might be facing a challenge but you must find the way through.

We don’t have to be overwhelmed… we can simply take one step. One step towards progress. One step towards harmony. One step towards resolution!

Thank you Robert Frost for simply encouraging us. You must take a step! And, you will make it through.

 

I’m Taking My Step,

Pamela

 


Robert Frost (1874-1963) was a highly-regarded poet known for his depiction of rural life. He published his first poem in high school. He attended Harvard but did not graduate due to illness; he received an honorary degree from Harvard posthumously, as well as more than 40 other honorary degrees. Though Frost grew up in the city, he lived on farms later in his life. He was a professor at Amherst College, and at Middlebury College for 42 years. Some of his best-known poems include “The Road Not Taken,” “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening,” and “Nothing Gold Can Stay.”

This particular quote is from the poem “A Servant to Servants” (1914). Many of Frost’s poems explore the splendor of the outdoors. However, “A Servant to Servants” is a contrast to the typical Frostian nature poem. Its speaker is the wife of a hard-working farmer who feels trapped in her life that seems meaningless. She explains her monotonous daily routine. The poem is written in iambic pentameter, although it varies in meter with no apparent rhyme scheme. A constant symbol in this poem is nature representing freedom, but it is a freedom that the speaker cannot attain.

Bio Source: Wikipedia


Fig¹.  Photo from Wikimedia