Monthly Archives: July 2019

Leadership Series: Mario Andretti’s Fast Lane To America, Part Four of Four

 

 

This is Part Four of Four in the Series on “Mario Andretti’s Fast Lane to America”.  Please click these links to read parts One, Two, and Three.

 

 

Thank you for joining me on this Leadership Series: How To Become a Leader; Practical Steps to Following Your Passion.

 

We’ve seen world-renowned car racer Mario Andretti follow his passion since he was a teenager, and become an award-winning driver! He’s stayed grounded, family-oriented and still involved with his passion of cars.

 

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What do you do next?

 

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You can give back.

Successful people find a way to help others, because they know they have been helped.

No one does it alone.

And that’s what he does!

On philanthropy, Mario states:

 

“You try to channel it in areas where you know it’s going to make a difference,” he said. “You try to do those things as the opportunity comes along. These are all the things that at the end of the day, it makes you feel good that I made a little bit of a difference, and that’s meaningful.”6

 

Mario gives back through Meals on Wheels, to help the elderly and housebound attain food security. In honor of Mario, we are also giving back — we’ve chosen Nepal Orphans Home Inc. project for fresh food and Rural Communities Empowerment Center’s project to bring technology and resources to communities in great need. In that way we honor his passion and his philanthropy.

 

Thank you joining us on our Leadership Series: How To Become a Leader; Practical Steps to Following Your Passion.

 

We are so glad you joined us in learning about Mario Andretti’s successful life. If it a world class race driver can make it by starting out in a refugee camp, you can too. Follow your passion, gain experience and then give back.

 

I thank you for being the great leader you are, and look forward to you sharing your journey! We will all look forward to hearing!

 

You’re Leading,

Pamela

 

 


 

Mario Andretti is an extremely successful race car driver and the only race car driver to have ever won the Indianapolis 500, the Daytona 500, and the Formula One World Championship. Mario, and his fraternal twin brother Aldo, were born in the former territory known as Istria. At the end of World War II, the territory was annexed by Yugoslovia and the Andretti family left in 1948 during what’s known as the Istrian exodus. They ended up in a refugee camp in Lucca, Italy, where his father would work hard labor jobs before they received the visa to join his uncle in Pennsylvania. Mario and his brother Aldo rebuilt a 1948 Hudson Commodore and began racing it. Aldo won the coin toss to do the first race and he won. Aldo went on to fracture his skull in a serious crash, but he would return later on. In 1969, Aldo suffered severe damage after crashing into a fence during an IMCA race and he quit racing.

 

In 1961, he married Dee Ann Andretti and they had three children together. Their two sons, Jeff and Michael, would also become race car drivers. Following Mario’s retirement, he has spent his time in a multitude of ways—including volunteering with Meals on Wheels deliveries in Pennsylvania. With his late wife Dee Ann, he was also involved with a number of local children’s charities.

 


Citations:
⁶ Ryan, Natem “Mario Andretti saluted for his charity work: ‘I love positive’”, NBC Sports, April 14, 2015, https://motorsports.nbcsports.com/2015/04/14/mario-andretti-saluted-for-his-charity-work-i-love-positives/
Fig. ¹⁰: Photo by Jim Culp retrieved from Flickr, https://www.flickr.com/photos/jimculp/29455644593
Fig. ¹¹: Photo by William on Unsplash

Leadership Series: Mario Andretti’s Fast Lane To America, Part Three of Four

 

 

This is Part Three of Four in the Series on “Mario Andretti’s Fast Lane to America”.  Please click these links to read parts One and Two.

 

 

Thank you for joining our Leadership Series: How To Become a Leader     

 

We feature real-life stories on how people became successful leaders, so you can too. We show you Practical Steps and Stories to Following Your Passion, leading you to your own success. Our feature today is on Mario Andretti, a world-class racer who started out in a refugee camp. Join us as we continue to explore his life story!

 

Within 20 years, Mario was a world-renowned racer. He was living his dream, and in America. He was married with children and awards and all. What to do next?

 

Beautifully and interestingly enough, Mario stayed true to his roots. He still lives in Nazareth, Pennsylvania and still spends time in his garages. He stays humble. He stays grounded. He still loves his cars. His life is very consistent.

 

 

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“I love spending time in the garages on either side of our house. I have 9 cars in all, including a Lamborghini and a Corvette.”5

 

So that’s a good lesson. Even when he can retire, he still pays attention to his cars.  He takes care of them and loves them and drives them.

 

 

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He drives to his passion and his passion drives his life.   It’s a great life partnership, one can have with one’s passion for one’s entire life!

 

You can do this too. You call follow your passion, and live your full life.

 

 

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What a beautiful story. Let’s find our passion, and stay true to humble dreams. They will happen!

 

Dreams are happening for you,

Pamela

 

 

Stay tuned for Part Four of the Four Part Series “Mario Andretti’s Fast Lane to America” tomorrow!

 


Citations:
⁵ Mybers, Marc, Ibid.
Fig. ⁷: Photo by Raul Varzar on Unsplash
Fig. ⁸: Racingone/ ISC Archives via Getty Images, retrieved from https://www.mcall.com/sports/motorracing/mc-mario-andretti-indy500-1981-unser-20160512-story.html
Fig. ⁹: Photo by chuttersnap on Unsplash

 

 

Leadership Series: Mario Andretti’s Fast Lane To America, Part Two of Four

 

 

This is Part Two of Four in the Series on “Mario Andretti’s Fast Lane to America”. Please click here to start from the beginning!

 

Thank you for joining our Leadership Series: How To Become a Leader     

 

We feature real-life stories on how people became successful leaders, so you can too. We show you Practical Steps and Stories to Following Your Passion, leading you to your own success. Our feature today is on Mario Andretti, a world-class racer who started out in a refugee camp. Join us as we continue to explore his life story!

 

The Mario Andretti family was on its way from war-torn Italy to America.  They had been working in car shops, learning, gaining experience. Heads-down, hands-in-car-parts operations. Learning, learning, learning. With perseverance, they followed their dreams.

 

 

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With patience, visas came three years later. Their family migrated to Pennsylvania where family resided. Always an observer, after dinner one night in Pennsylvania, Mario and his brother saw something flashing in the distance as well as loud sounds. They soon found it was their love! It was the explosion of a car engine!

 

 

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They literally ran towards their passion, which was about a mile away and featured a racetrack. They had a high-end taste in cars due to being from Italy and their work on Formula 1 cars. While these cars were different, the boys kept showing up at the track. Experience built upon experience. It was time to build their own car for the first time: a 1948 Hudson Commodore.

 

To get in at the race track, they stated they were 19 and 21 years old, racers from Italy. Soon, Aldo and his brother, Mario, each won two of the first four stock-car races. 4 They won nearly $150 and used that to build their next car.5 Their passion was on their way! Instead of working on cars, they were now building them — and racing them!  

 

 

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Now Mario is considered one of the top race car drivers in the world. He’s won the 1978 Formula One World Championship races and most specifically, the top IndyCar race, 4 times. He’s known for being the only driver to win the NASCAR Cup Series, Formula One and an Indianapolis 500.

 

 

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So you can follow your passion, too, and realize success. Mario is a good man, and he did it. You can be a good person, and you can do it.

 

Follow Passion = Realize Success,

Pamela

 

 

Stay tuned for Part Three of the Four Part Series “Mario Andretti’s Fast Lane to America” tomorrow!

 

 


Citations:
³ Myers, Marc “Mario Andretti: From Italian Refugee Camp to the Winner’s Circle at Indy”, The Wall Street Journal, July 31, 2018, https://www.wsj.com/articles/how-mario-andretti-one-of-the-fastest-americans-ever-discovered-his-speed-1533047673
Fig. ³: Photo by Vance Osterhout on Unsplash
Fig. ⁴: Photo by Oscar Sutton on Unsplash
Fig. ⁵: Photo by MiRo Am on Unsplash
Fig. ⁶: Amy Hollowbush, contributed photo retrieved from https://www.mcall.com/sports/motorracing/mc-mario-andretti-daytona-500-5020170221-story.html

Leadership Series: Mario Andretti’s Fast Lane to America, Part One of Four

 

 

This is Part One of Four in the Series on “Mario Andretti’s Fast Lane to America”.

 

Thank you for joining our Leadership Series: How To Become a Leader     

 

We feature real-life stories on how people became successful leaders, so you can too. We show you Practical Steps and Stories to Following Your Passion, leading you to your own success. Our feature today is on Mario Andretti, a world-class racer who started out in a refugee camp. Join us as we explore his life story!

 

Before Mario Andretti first came to America, his life wasn’t glamorous. His family of six was housed in a couple of rooms in a college dormitory in a refugee camp in Italy, right at the end of World War II. 

 

 

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His uncle was able to find a job for his father at a cement factory and so they came over to America.Mario was grateful to be in America and felt life could only go up.

 

 

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While his father was applying for the visa to come to America, he and his brother, Aldo, happened to be playing in a cul-de-sac. One day they saw some cars speeding by. They were able to locate them at a local car shop in a parking garage across from where they lived.

 

The Andretti brothers had the courage to go and meet the owners. And really, that was the start of their dreams. They went to help, observe and eventually work on cars there after school.For a start, they were allowed to park them in garage. Even this gave him a feel and love of cars. He and his brother Aldo continued to work at the shop and obtained a strong love for Italian cars. Unbeknownst to the brothers they would in the future attend races such as the 1954 Italian Grand Prix, and win races such as Daytona.

 

What an amazing pursuit of one’s dreams.

 

They saw cars.

 

They explored.

 

They followed their interests.

 

They met the owners.

 

They offered to help.

 

They were on their way to becoming world class racers by doing the above. Above doesn’t sound overly exciting or world class, but it’s following your passion, offering help, getting experience. That’s how you achieve your dreams! It’s that simple! And, that much daily, hard work.

 

So let’s watch this story closely.  Humble backgrounds and they followed a lead about which they were excited. You can do this, too!  This could be you start to being a successful engineer, the first woman flutist in South Congo, a first-time CEO or a new entrepreneur. You can do it, too.

 

You can do it, too.

Pamela

 

 

Stay tuned for Part Two of the Four Part Series “Mario Andretti’s Fast Lane to America” tomorrow!

 


Citations:
1 Myers, Marc “Mario Andretti: From Italian Refugee Camp to the Winner’s Circle at Indy”, The Wall Street Journal, July 31, 2018, https://www.wsj.com/articles/how-mario-andretti-one-of-the-fastest-americans-ever-discovered-his-speed-1533047673
² Ibid.
Fig.1: Photo by Bailey Scully on Unsplash
Fig.2: Photo by Matt Antonioli on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “If There Is No Struggle, There Is No Progress.” – Frederick Douglass

 

 

“If there is no struggle, there is no progress.”

– Frederick Douglass

 

 

Frederick Douglass for Living and Giving

 

 

Thank goodness he struggled, persevered and progressed. It helped him, me and our entire world be fairer, more compassionate, and true in our relations with one another.

 

We all struggle. And we all face lovely times of hope and joy.  That joy is indeed waiting for you, which aids all mankind.

 

 


Frederick Douglass (1818-1895) was an American social reformer, orator, writer and statesman. After escaping slavery, Douglass helped lead the abolitionist movement, acquiring a distinguished repertoire of his oratory and writing against slavery. He proved the slaveholders’ argument wrong in their claim that slaves did not possess the intellectual capacity to be independent American citizens. Douglass participated as an impressive player in changing history: rather than quietly living the rest of his life as a free man after escaping slavery, he risked that attainment to speak out for freedom and better treatment for all African Americans.

Douglass and Anna had five children: Rosetta Douglass, Lewis Henry Douglass, Frederick Douglass Jr., Charles Remond Douglass, and Annie Douglass. Charles and Rosetta helped produce his newspapers. Anna Douglass remained a loyal supporter of her husband’s public work.

BioSource: Wikipedia

Citations:
Fig¹: The U.S. National Archives on flickr

 

The Pamela Positive: “Can’t” – Edgar Guest

 

 

Dear Living and Giving Readers,

 

“Can’t” is a favorite word of some people. They don’t believe they can do something, or you can do something.

 

 

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Yet you are not a CAN’T!    You are an I CAN.

 

 

woman jumping on brown sand during daytime

 

 

I CAN improve on my job.

 

I CAN move to a new city and make it!

 

I CAN find a new way of living. I am leaving my old, unethical ways.

 

I CAN appreciate my mom with my tone in every word I share. Don’t accept a misstep here, especially with the ones you love!

 

I CAN have a positive attitude even when it’s raining.

 

I CAN have a positive attitude even when it’s 101 degrees!

 

 

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I CAN, I CAN, I CAN. Life is so important. Have an I CAN attitude everywhere, and in everything you do!

 

 

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Here is the case against it I CAN’T.  It’s a fount of discouragement and avoid, avoid it all costs.  Read on to read its damages, and then to defend against it.

 

 

“Can’t is the worst word that’s written or spoken.

 Doing more harm here than slander and lies;

 On it is many a strong spirit broken,

  And with it many a good purpose dies.

 It springs from the lips of the thoughtless each morning

  And robs us of courage we need through the day:

 It rings in our ears like a timely sent warning

  And laughs when we falter and fall by the way.

 

Can’t  is the father of feeble endeavor,

  The parent of terror and halfhearted work;

 It weakens the efforts of artisans clever,

  And makes of the toiler an indolent shirk.

 It poisons the soul of the man with a vision,

  It stifles in infancy many a plan;

  It greets honest toiling with open derision

  And mocks at the hopes and the dreams of a man.

 

  Can’t  is a word none should speak without blushing;

  To utter it should be a symbol of shame;

 Ambition and courage it daily is crushing;

  It blights a man’s purpose and shortens his aim.

 Despise it with all of your hatred of error;

  Refuse it the lodgment it seeks in your brain;

 Arm against it as a creature of terror,

  And all that you dream of you someday shall gain.

 

Can’t  is the word that is foe to ambition,

An enemy ambushed to shatter your will;

Its prey is forever the man with a mission

And bows but to courage and patience and skill.

Hate it, with hatred that’s deep and undying,

For once it is welcomed ’twill break any man;

Whatever the goal you are seeking, keep trying

 And answer this demon by saying: ” I  can .”

                                                                     -Edgar Guest

 

 

Have an I CAN attitude and UPLIFT your life.  You will live with fullness, love and joy.

 

I CAN Today,

 

Pamela

 

 


 

Edgar Guest was born in Birmingham, on August 20, 1881, England, to Edwin and Julia Wayne Guest. The family settled in Detroit, Michigan, in 1891. When Edwin lost his job in 1893, eleven-year-old Edgar between working odd jobs after school. In 1895 he was hired as a copy boy for the Detroit Free Press, where he would work for almost sixty-five years. His father died when the poet was seventeen, and Guest was forced to drop out of high school and work full time at the newspaper. He worked his way up from a copy boy to a job in the news department. His first poem appeared on December 11, 1898. His weekly column, “Chaff,” first appeared in 1904; his topical verses eventually became the daily “Breakfast Table Chat,” which was syndicated to over three-hundred newspapers throughout the United States.

Guest married Nellie Crossman in 1906. The couple had three children. His brother Harry printed his first two books, Home Rhymes and Just Glad Things, in small editions. His verse quickly found an audience and the Chicago firm of Reilly and Britton began to publish his books at a rate of nearly one per year. His collections include Just Folks (1917), Over Here (1918), When Day Is Done (1921), The Passing Throng (1923), Harbor Lights of Home (1928), and Today and Tomorrow (1942).

Biosource: Poets.org

 


Citations:
Fig. ¹: Photo by Christian Erfurt on Unsplash
Fig. ²: Photo by Mohammed Hijas on Unsplash
Fig. ³: Photo by bruce mars on Unsplash 
Fig.⁴: Photo by Blake Cheek on Unsplash

The Pamela Positive: Nothing Can Outweigh A Love Filled Heart – Heinrich Heine

 

 

“Nothing Can Outweigh a Love Filled Heart.”

 

“Of Pearls and Stars 

The pearly treasures of the sea,

The lights that spatter heaven above,

More precious than these wonders are 

My heart-of-hearts filled with your love. 

The ocean’s power, the heavenly sights 

Cannot outweigh a love filled heart. “

 -Heinrich Heine

 

 

person forming heart with their hands

 

 

What a lovely lesson from Heinrich Heine, an essayist from the 19th century.   He writes how love affects him personally, and how no matter how stunningly beautiful the sky, stars, and oceans, nothing overcomes love.

 

 

woman on bike reaching for man's hand behind her also on bike

 

 

While we can be grateful for the beautiful nature, we can be more grateful for all the beautiful love we have in our lives.  There is someone who loves and you love. Hug them today. Don’t take them for granted!

Believe it Today!

Pamela

 

 


Heinrich Heine  (13 December 1797 – 17 February 1856) German poet and journalist, born at Düsseldorf, of Jewish parents, on the 13th of December 1797. His father, after various vicissitudes in business, had finally settled in Düsseldorf, and his mother, who possessed much energy of character, was the daughter of a physician of the same place. Heinrich was the eldest of four children, and received his education, first in private schools, then in the Lyceum of his native town; he acquired a knowledge of French and English, as well as some tincture of the classics and Hebrew. In October 1834 Heine made the acquaintance of a young Frenchwoman, Eugénie Mirat, a saleswoman in a boot-shop in Paris, and before long had fallen passionately in love with her. Although ill-educated, vain and extravagant, she inspired the poet with a deep and lasting affection.

As a prose writer, Heine’s merits were very great. His work was, in the main, journalism, but it was journalism of a high order, and, after all, the best literature of the “Young German” school to which he belonged was of this character. Heine’s light fancy, his agile intellect, his straightforward, clear style stood him here in excellent stead. The prose writings of his French period mark, together with Börne’s Briefe aus Paris, the beginning of a new era in German journalism and a healthy revolt against the unwieldly prose of the Romantic period.   

BioSource: NNDB

Citation:
Fig. ¹: Photo by Tyler Nix on Unsplash
Fig. ²: Photo by Everton Vila on Unsplash