Monthly Archives: May 2019

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Belief Is A Wise Wager.”- Blaise Pascal

“Granted that faith cannot be proved, what harm will come to you if you gamble on its truth and it proves false? If you gain, you gain all; if you lose, you lose nothing. Wager, then, without hesitation that He exists.”   

        – Blaise Pascal

 

Believing, about anything that is good, is the positive way forward in life.

 

 

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Believe in love.

 

Believe in nature and its calm healing power!

 

Believe in goodness.

 

Throw your weight into believing in anything good!

 

 

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Investing in Believing,

Pamela

 

 


 

 

Mathematician Blaise Pascal was born on June 19, 1623, in Clermont-Ferrand, France. He was the third of four children and only son to Etienne and Antoinette Pascal. Etienne had decided to educate Blaise—a child prodigy—at home so he could design an unorthodox curriculum and make sure that Blaise was able to express his own innate curiosity. In the 1640s he invented the Pascaline, an early calculator, and further validated Evangelista Torricelli’s theory concerning the cause of barometrical variations. In the 1650s, Pascal laid the foundation of probability theory with Pierre de Fermat and published the theological work “Les Provinciales”, a groundbreaking series of letters that defended his Jansenist faith.

 

Pascal is also widely known for his body of notes posthumously released as the Pensées. He died in Paris on August 19, 1662. He was 39 years old. Pascal’s inventions and discoveries have been instrumental to developments in the fields of geometry, physics and computer science, influencing 17th-century visionaries like Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz and Isaac Newton.

 

Citations:
Fig. 1: Photo by Ben White on Unsplash
Fig. 2: Photo by Rachel Pfuetzner on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Coming Together Is A Beginning; Keep Together Is Progress; Working Together Is Success.” – Henry Ford

                         

“Coming together is a beginning; keep together is progress; working together is success.”

– Henry Ford

 

When I read that, my heart sighs in relief. That’s just a description of healthy management or a positive marriage. And what a joy it is when we have it!

 

 

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A team that works together with ease, with joy.  This certainly isn’t just about manufacturing or cars!

We all know that synergy…. it’s that feeling that people are communicating seamlessly. You might know what each other is going to say. Perhaps you instinctively know best how to split activities and responsibilities, respecting the unique talents of each.

Most importantly, you share. You share thoughts, ideas, insights, work and wisdom.

 

 

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May we come together in peace. Keep together by excellence in communication, building a sure foundation. And work together towards success, where both parties feels supported, triumphant, and….loved. Marriage, Management, Meeting, No Matter What — that’s the feeling we strive for: Successful Communication and Execution Through Love.

 

 


 

 

Henry Ford was an American industrialist, the founder of the Ford Motor Company, and sponsor of the development of the assembly line technique of mass production. Ford married Clara Ala Bryant in 1888 and supported himself by farming and running a sawmill. He did not invent the automobile, but he developed and manufactured the Model T. This was the first automobile that many middle class Americans could afford to buy and it revolutionized transportation and American industry. As owner of the Ford Motor Company, he became one of the richest and well-known people in the world. He is credited with the concept of “Fordism”, a mass production of inexpensive goods coupled with high wages for workers. Ford had a global vision and his intense commitment to systematically lowering costs resulted in many technical and business innovations.

 

Citations:
Fig. 1: Photo by rawpixel on Unsplash
Fig. 2: Photo by freestocks.org on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Spending Time with People You Love and Who Love You”

“It is only a slight exaggeration to say that happiness is the experience of spending time with people you love and who love you.”

 –Daniel Kahneman, Nobel Laureate

 

Gifts and giving.  We associate so much of that with happiness.  Yet our one true Happiness is Loving Others. 

 

 

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Oh, that sweet presence to just be around those we cherish and feel at home with!

 

 


 

 

Daniel Kahneman is an Israeli-American psychologist and Nobel laureate.  He is known for his work in the psychology of decision-making.  He was born in Tel Aviv, spent his childhood in France, and moved to Israel in the late 1940s.  He studied psychology at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, and began his career as a lecturer there.  Kahneman has published extensively in psychology, and received the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics in 2002 for his work on prospect theory.  He is currently on the faculty at Princeton.

Seven Nonprofit Strategies For Gaining Bigger Brand Name Donors

 

I am so pleased to share UniversalGiving™ was featured in a Forbes Expert Panel article. This article focused on how to receive donations from big-name brands and you can see answers from the rest of the community here. Scroll down to see our response on the importance of consistence communication.

 

 

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6. Appeal To The Company’s Interests

“To best capture, a corporate foundation’s support, take two tacks. First, follow their guidelines, otherwise, you’ll get knocked out. Second, add something that relates to the personal philanthropic interests of the head of the foundation. They will see you meet the criteria and also care about and are in line with their interests. However, it must be authentic to the grant.”

 Pamela Hawley, UniversalGiving

 

 

 

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: Winston Churchill: We’re Not Made of Sugar Candy

       “We have not journeyed all this way across the centuries, across the oceans, across the mountains, across the prairies, because we are made of sugar candy.”

-Sir Winston Churchill

 

Going through a tough time?  Does the mountain you are climbing seem too steep?

 

 

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But it’s not just a mountain, and it’s not your mountain only.

You are striving not only for yourself, but also for others.  Whatever you are trying to achieve today, whatever you hope to have in the future, can be used as inspiration for others…

You’re learning from it. Growing from it, and becoming a better person. Don’t give up, you don’t want to do that; don’t be discouraged, it won’t aid your cause.  You’re not a piece of cotton candy, disintegrating; no, you are firm, resolute, patient.

 

 

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Your mountain lesson isn’t just for you. It will be an example, a story with which you can encourage others.

Thank you for persevering — the world thanks you!

 

 


 

 

Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill was a British politician and Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1940 to 1945 and again from 1951 to 1955. Widely regarded as one of the greatest wartime leaders of the 20th century, Churchill was also an officer in the British army, a historian, a writer, and an artist. He is the only British Prime Minister to have received the Noble Prize in Literature, and was the first person to be made an honorary citizen of the United States. He was born into the aristocratic family of the Dukes of Marlborough, a branch of the Spencer family. Churchill married Clementine Hozier in 1908 and had five children: Diana, Randolph, Sarah, Marigold Frances, and Mary.

 

 

 

Citations:
Fig.1: Photo by Tiraya Adam on Unsplash
Fig. 2: Photo by Mikael Cho on Unsplash 

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: Celebrate True Wealth

 

Wealth is a state of mind and life. We tend to associate poverty with money. But poverty can be mental, emotional or Spiritual Poverty.™ I am often struck by this in my travel and volunteering in developing nations. Often, the divorce rates are low. Families not only stay together, but also spend time together. They gather food from the fields together, cook together and share meals together.

 

 

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Contrast us: 15 minute family dinners if we are lucky. Fast-food and food distanced from its natural base. We eat alone; we eat in our cars. Divorces are easier to get, and in our mind it can be easier to allow those thoughts in as a possibility, rather than work through critical issues. So we lose the connection to family. We lose the connection to the local farm. We can lose the connection to long-term commitment.

 

 

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We lose our greatest asset in natural wealth: relationships. Relationships with ourselves, our families, the earth. This wealth creates happy, balanced, productive, lower stress lifestyles, because we are connected in the way we are meant to be.

Further, we often pass by our heritage and where we come from. In many emerging nations, and especially in the continent of Africa, we see tribes value their connection to their heritage as primary importance even above their nationality. There is a deep-rooted connection to rituals and history which keeps people grounded in who they are, and the deeper, long-term meaning of being a part of a larger community in their lives.

 

 

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Poverty is about money, at times. It has to be addressed as people should have the opportunity to live productive lives and make choices about what they would like to devote their lives to. Poverty is also about our well-being. Often when we get beyond “money poverty,” we forget “well-being poverty,” and get trapped in a go-go-go consumer culture.

 

 

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I hope we can celebrate the healthy wealth that is accessible to us all in positive, committed relationships with ourselves, one another, our families, our earth, our communities and our heritage. How wonderful this is available to us all.

 

 


Citations:
Fig. 1: Photo by Lee Myungseon on Unsplash
Fig. 2: Photo by Sai De Silva on Usnplash
Fig. 3: Photo by Ramdan Authentic on Unsplash
Fig. 4: Photo by Tyler Nix on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: Why You Should Sit By An Older Man

 

Now that might sound funny, but the other day I felt called to sit by an older man.

We were at a community gathering, celebrating an organist for all her church music. 

She had performed beautifully over many years and she was a lovely person. We had contributed goodies and a potluck, and a celebratory cake. People were laughing, chatting and sharing memories. It was a wonderful sense of togetherness, that we often miss in our social media society.

 

 

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But on the couch was an older man. He didn’t look down, he didn’t look up, he was just sitting there. I asked a friend who he was.

 

“He’s the father of one of our members here, and he’s blind.”

 

I thought what that must feel like.

He’s in a sea of people and conversation….and no one’s talking to him…..

yet he hears everything.

It must be a big loud jumble… but nothing specifically directed towards him…… My heart went out to him.

 

 

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I went right away over to the couch and sat down with him. I held his hand and said,

 

“I’m Pamela! Who are you? Are you having a nice day?”

 

His eyes perked up and he continued to look ahead. His face crinkled with a smile. He proceeded to tell me, with very joyous terms, about who he was, his life, and fascinating stories of history. He remembered the time when the Korean War was mentioned in school as well as when World War II was being announced. What prolific, historical events to be a youngster and to hear this global and national news. So monumental, so devastating.

 

 

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He had many fascinating stories to tell about his childhood, about the importance of his aunt, his mom’s sister, and how devoted she was to church and community.

I listened, listened, listened.

We had such a joyous time.

Having our quiet time of sharing, amidst a joyous gathering.

In our lives, that’s all that really needs to be done is to listen, listen, listen, listen with love, listen with your heart.

Everyone has a story. Everyone has a story to tell. And so we listen.

 

 

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What yours? If you want your story to be heard, if you want to be known… then take some time to listen. Take time to listen to someone else’s story. You will learn; they will love you for it. You both will be enriched and, in this case, a blind man’s eyes opened my blind eyes.

I want to hear your story,

Pamela

 

 


Citations:
Fig. 1: Photo by Huy Phan on Unsplash
Fig. 2: Photo by Rhand Mccoy on Unsplash
Fig. 3: Photo by Toa Heftiba on Unsplash
Fig. 4: Photo by Alex Holyoake on Unsplash
Fig. 5: Photo by Mimi Thian on Unsplash