Monthly Archives: March 2017

The Classic Pamela Positive: Do Good, Feel Good

meadow-680607_640Do Good, Feel Good. What Kind of Ethics is That?

It’s straight from our esteemed President Lincoln, who is referring to that still small voice that tells us right and wrong. Everyone has it within…and we hear that gentle voice urging us one way or not.  So President Lincoln is not calling for a marvelous free for all where anyone follows their whim.  He’s calling us to listen to an internal guide of Truth.

It’s about truly doing good, authentic, down home, core, natural goodness.   This is something which is in all of us.  And it’s available to us all.   Do Good, feel that confirmation in your heart that it is the right thing. Then you feel good, and you know it is right. And then I’d add, keep on doing whatever is good!

“When I do good, I feel good; when I do bad, I feel bad, and that is my religion.”

– Abraham Lincoln

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Abraham Lincoln served as the 16th President of the United States, during the Civil War.  He was instrumental in ending slavery and is admired for his commitment to national unity, equal rights, liberty, and democracy in America.  He is also known for his humble background, self-education, and skill with writing and rhetoric.  He was not a member of any one organized religion, but he frequently used Biblical imagery and references in his writing and speaking, and referenced a Providence who had a higher purpose.  The Civil War and the deaths of two of his children led him towards the end of his life to more frequently speak of dependence on God.

“You have to get people talking the same language before you get them around the table” – Pakzan Dastoor

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“You have to get people talking the same language before you get them around the table” – Pakzan Dastoor

What a wonderful insight from the Dasra Foundation!

Dasra is an innovative foundation working on extreme social change in India.  I just heard them speak at an amazing conference at Stanford focusing on Indian philanthropy. Local Indians and Silicon Valley Indian entrepreneurs gathered together to discuss how to give intelligently.

Dasra’s strategic approach to social problems has dramatically increased the impact and scale of social change in India.  They helped take nearly 1000 nonprofits and socially conscious businesses to the next level. They have more than 28 research reports ranging from adolescent girls’ empowerment to child malnutrition and sports for development.

And Pakzan is right.   The Advisory Leader of Dasra knows that we need to collaborate, listen, and support one another in order to achieve true success.

So the “right language” is not really about a dialect.  It’s about our motivations.

Before we come to the table, we need to be on the same page.   That means our motives and aspirations are aligned.   Then we are really listening!  And the conversation builds to higher levels to serve the world, our communities and our partnerships.

Are you facing a challenge in philanthropy today? Or how about your own life?

We can take Pakzan’s advice.   Let’s slow down. We can make sure we are listening.   Are we speaking the same language? You might both be speaking Hindi.  But if you don’t have the same values, your words will blow right one another.

To truly scale we must have the same values.      

We can be great social innovators, communicators and doers by speaking the same language: Listen, love and support your partner.


As India’s leading strategic philanthropy foundation, Dasra actively shapes the process of social change by forming powerful partnerships with funders and social enterprises. In the past 15 years, Dasra has been working towards building a ‘thriving ecosystem’ that enables knowledge creation, capacity building, strategic funding, and collaboration in order to touch and transform the lives of 800 million Indians. 

I am here to grow

“A great spouse loves you exactly as you are.  An extraordinary spouse helps you grow; inspires you to be, do and give your very best.” – Fawn Weaver

If you want to become a great person… grow.

Please tell me what flower doesn’t want to open.A_Rose_In_The_Reflection_(237043752)-small

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We aren’t born perfectly and we don’t end perfectly.

Do you make mistakes?

I do.

But I am here to grow. To move on from the past and reach a greater version of myself.

And the best way we can do that is to grow in love. That’s our soil. Whatever relationship you are in, make sure the relationships in which you are planted, are loving you to new heights.

  • Fawn Weaver is the president of ValRentco Corporation, a subsidiary of ValleyRentals.com and a former hotel general manager. As noted in her profile on Happy Wives Club, she is “not a stay-at-home wife” but “a Happy Wife” who proved through her Happy Wives Club that women like herself view marriage and spending time with their husbands are two of the greatest blessings in their lives. She and her husband Keith have been married since 2003.

Bio source: Happy Wives Club – Meet Fawn

Photo sources: Wikimedia: Rosebud And Raindrops and Everystockphoto.com: Yellow Rose

“The Future Will Belong To the Nature-Smart…The More High-Tech We Become, the More Nature We Need.” – Richard Louv

road-21205_640“The future will belong to the nature-smart…The more high-tech we become, the more nature we need.”

– Richard Louv

We email, text, tweet, and then buy on Amazon.  The Tribune Media Group recently reported we’re on the Web at over 5 hours each day.  In addition to that, we’re involved in technology almost every day.

Do we see Nature every day?

AbiesLasiocarpa_-WildFlowers-CoonCreekSummit-MountainCityRanger-DistrictOfHumboldt-ToiyabeNationalForest_July12-2013-smallEven if the nature immediately around you isn’t as beautiful as above, there is still so much glory. The sun, green grass, fresh air, a cool breeze, rain that refreshes all and cleans the earth.

A_view_of_clouds_and_sky5-smallLook up to the sky.

I remember as child, one of my favorite things was playing outdoors in my backyard. I’d be in the sandbox, gazing at the glorious California blue of the sky, and the tall, green trees for which “Palo Alto” was named.  The very tip tops seemed to frame in their own haphazard way, a fringe around the sky.  And seeing that medium dark green up next to a beautiful heaven blue, was  a bit of perfection.  It was peacefulness in my childhood.

So technology does seem to reign at times.   It’s what life has evolved to, and we shouldn’t stop it.  It allows us to stay in touch with people we love, and to get certain things done quicker.  Yet, we can take steps to ensure balance in our lives. Balance for engaging with the natural world just as much as we do with gadgets.

Join me in appreciating whatever nature is in front of you today.

Pamela

Richard Louv is a journalist and author of books about the connections amongst family, nature, and community.  He is the founding chairman of the Children & Nature Network, an organization that helps to connect today’s children and future generations to the natural world.  Louv is also Honorary Co-chairman of Canada’s national Children and Nature Alliance; a part of the board of directors of ecoAmerica and the editorial board of Ecopsychology. Previously, he was a columnist for The San Diego Union-Tribune and a columnist and member of the editorial advisory board for Parents magazine.  Louv’s accomplishments include the 2007 Cox Award for “sustained achievement in public service,” the highest honor of Clemson University.   In 2009, he earned the International Making Cities Livable Jane Jacobs Award.

Louv is married to Kathy Frederick Louv and the father of two sons, Jason and Matthew.  Although an author and journalist, Richard Louv has said about himself that “he would rather fish than write.”

Bio source: About Richard Louv

Statistic source: Tribune Media Group

The Pamela Positive: “Intuitions of What Work, Love, Human Relationship, and Health Can Be”

“…intuitions of what work, love, human relationship, and health can be.”

Charles Eisenstein points to a world that is divine.

It’s a sincere manifestation of positivity and living at its best. It strips away self-focus so that we can conjoin with a greater nature. Actually, the self, and technological connections, don’t define us. Rather, principles of love, kindness and truth amongst ourselves, and in coordination with nature, are what create this new life.

Let’s embrace what Mr. Eisenstein is putting forth in his treatise The Ascent of Humanity.  We can encourage ourselves to ascend together: to a place of goodness where each part benefits the other.  It’s a new reality, and he encourages us to not accept anything less.  This new world is coming.

The Ascent of Humanity

Need the most sublime achievements of art, music, literature, science, and technology be built upon the wreckage of the natural world and the misery of its inhabitants?

We intuit also that something similar is possible collectively…Another way of being is possible, and it is right in front of us, closer than close; that much is transparently certain. Yet it slips away so easily that we hardly believe it could be the foundation of life; so we relegate it to an afterlife and call it Heaven, or we relegate it to the future and call it Utopia.

Underlying the vast swath of ruin our civilization has carved is not human nature, but the opposite: human nature denied. This denial of human nature rests in turn upon an illusion, a misconception of self and world…the reconception of the self… is underway.

Saints and mystics have tried for thousands of years to teach us how we are trapped in a delusion about who we are. This delusion inevitably brings about suffering, and eventually a crisis that can only be resolved through a collapse, a surrender, and an opening to a state of being beyond previous self-limitation. These spiritual teachings have helped me realize, at least partway, my intuitions of what work, love, human relationship, and health can be.  

The examples of what life is surround me and define what is normal. Do I see anyone around me whose work is their joy, whose time is their own, whose love is their passion? It can’t happen. Be thankful, say the voices, that my job is reasonably stimulating, that I feel “in love” at least once in a while, that the pain is manageable and life’s uncertainties under control. Let good enough be good enough.

… trying harder can never work.  Soon, though, this mode of being will come to an end, to be replaced by a profoundly different understanding of the self, and a profoundly different relationship between human and nature.

The root and the epitome of separation is the discrete, isolated self of modern perception: the “I am” of Descartes, the “economic man” of Adam Smith…Technology distances us from nature and insulates us from her rhythms. For example, most Americans’ lives are little affected by the seasons of the year. We eat the same food year-round, shipped in from California; air conditioning keeps us cool in the summer; heating warm in the winter. Natural physical limitations of muscle and bone no longer limit how far we can travel, how high we can build, or the distance at which we can communicate. Each advance in technology distances us from nature, yes, but also frees us from natural limitations. Hence, the “ascent”. But how can all these improvements add up to the world we find ourselves in today?

Even in the darkest days, everyone senses a higher possibility, a world that was meant to be, life as we were meant to live it. Glimpses of this “world of wholeness and beauty” have inspired idealists for thousands of years, and echo in our collective psyche as notions of Heaven, an Age of Aquarius, or Eden…

Source: Introduction, The Ascent of Humanity by Charles Eisenstein

Charles Eisenstein graduated from Yale and spent ten years as a Chinese-English translator.  He is currently teaching at Goddard College.  He is also the author of Sacred Economics and The Yoga of EatingVisit his website to read more about The Ascent of Humanity.

“…Bright Eyes And Genuine Smiles…Paves The Way For All Kinds Of Things To Happen.” – Peggy Dulaney

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“That meeting of bright eyes and genuine smiles is so heart-opening that it paves the way for all kinds of things to happen.” – Peggy Dulaney, Granddaughter of John. D. Rockefeller

Bright eyes, genuine smiles. Can you live this every day?  What if we greet everyone with those two simple gifts.

Your honest, clear, observant, caring eyes.

Your sincere, warm, welcoming smile.

With those two assets, you’ll change the world.

Let’s do it today.

 

Bright and Smiling,

Pamela

 

“Margaret Dulany “Peggy” Rockefeller (born 1947) is a philanthropist and the fourth child of David Rockefeller and Margaret McGrath. She is a fourth-generation member (“the cousins”) of the Rockefeller family. She is extremely committed to family and a proud grandparent…

Her most influential impact on the world is as founder and chair of the Synergos Institute, which she established in New York in 1986. The mission of the organization is to work together with its partners to “mobilize resources and bridge social and economic divides to reduce poverty and increase equity around the world”. Its most prominent public event, the “University for a Night“, brings together senior leaders from government, business and civil society in a positive dialogue on inter-sector collaboration and problem solving. She is relentlessly devoted to serving the world, traveling on service projects and site visits in the Middle East, U.K., Cuba, New York and California. She lives her mission and values everyday.” (Source: Wikipedia)

 

The Grass Is Greenest Where You Water It

rice-field-387715_640“The grass is greenest where you water it. Successful couples have learned to resist the grass is greener myth – i.e. someone else will make me happy. They have learned to put their energy into making themselves and their marriage better.”

-Mitch Temple

Get inspired by the latest AUDIO version of this blog!

Let’s be focused on how green we can make our grass!

Truly wouldn’t that be lovely?  If we all focused on what we have — the wonderful family or our friends who are like family; the job, or the opportunity to explore something new; the husband or the opportunity to date and find the right person – what a joy-filled world we would have!  And a joyful world starts with each one of our own little worlds.

So this isn’t restricted to simply appreciating your marriage. This is about any relationship or circumstance in life. If you want to be happy, appreciate the parts that are good — and invest in them.

If you want to see something to grow, water it!   Let’s look at some practical ways to do so.

512px-Watering-can-green

Love him.  If it’s your husband, love him. Don’t focus on his faults. Well, his clothes might not match. But, he empties the dishwasher.  Let’s water that. 32px-Smiley.svg  Remember, there are millions of women… simply wanting to be married. You have a lifelong committed partner, and that is a very green blessing.

Appreciate your business partner’s strengths. If it’s your business partner, appreciate their vision even if they  miss the details. Or, appreciate their attention to detail, if they are missing part of the vision. Work with who they are, and find some quality of value. Let’s be grateful for the partners we have in life.

Love your roommate. If they don’t take out the garbage, value that they are nice companions to speak with when you get home at night, pay their rent on time, or like to water plants.

Appreciate your teenager. Maybe they aren’t so talkative right now. But they get B+ and As, are good people, and don’t get in trouble. We definitely want to put the sprinkler on that. 32px-Smiley.svg

Value your co-chair.  Maybe they’re brusque.  But they deliver value and care a lot.  Fertilize and nurture the value they are giving.  Don’t criticize what they don’t have; be grateful for the strengths they bring. Supplement them. If they are stunning roses with thorns, then plant your gentle daisies.  That’s why you are there!

Be Grateful for the Weather as it Keeps the World Going Round. It’s cold.  I know it’s Minnesota, or Hanover.  It can be brutal!  But it’s also beautiful.  Nature and greenery are gorgeous…droughts are not.  In colder climates, strong, tightknit communities are the norm.  Families bond together.  It’s green in the land, and in your heart.

So dear Leaders… Water It… Wherever You Are!

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Mitch Temple serves as the director over marriage programs at Focus on the Family in Colorado Springs, Colorado. He represents Focus at national events, seminars, media interviews and radio programs.  He has served for 23 years as a pulpit and counseling pastor, specializing in crisis, business and marriage- and family-related issues. He is a published author in various professional journals, and co-author of four marriage books such as The Marriage Turnaround.  His website Mitch Temple Online offers individuals, companies, and churches information on services, articles by Temple, and contributions by many members.  Mitch has been married to Rhonda for 30 years, have 3 grown children and one grand baby.

Bio sources: Focus on the Family and Mitch Temple Online

Quote source: Ten Secrets to a Successful Marriage