Monthly Archives: July 2013

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Do Great Deeds with Little Means” – Russell Conwell

“Greatness consists in doing great deeds with little means in the accomplishment of vast purposes.

It consists in the private ranks of life, in helping one’s fellows, in benefiting one’s neighborhood, in blessing one’s own city and state.”

– Russell Conwell

It’s that simple.

Give something today,
Pamela

Russell Conwell (February 15, 1843 – December 6, 1925) was an American Baptist minister, orator, philanthropist, lawyer, and writer. He is best remembered as the founder and first president of Temple University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and for his inspirational lecture Acres of Diamonds. The son of Massachusetts farmers, Conwell attended Yale University and after graduating enlisted in the Union Army during the American Civil War. He was ordained as a Baptist minister in 1880, and delivered his famous speech “Acres of Diamonds” over 6,000 times around the world. The central idea of the work is that one need not look elsewhere for opportunity, achievement, or fortune – the resources to achieve all good things are present in one’s own community. Conwell’s capacity to establish Temple University and his other civic projects largely derived from the income that he earned from the speech. The published version has been regarded as a classic of New Thought literature since the 1870s.

The Classic Pamela Positive: “It Is the Open-Mindedness to Little Things That Brings Human Success.”

What a wonderful story which shows how we can all be resourceful. We can figure out a different way to achieve even our smallest needs, and maintain a positive outlook. Look up, look around, and use what you see!

It’s there for us all…It’s already been provided.

Pamela

I said to a relative of mine, who was a professor at Harvard:
“I was cold all the time I was there, and I shivered so that my teeth shook”.
Said he: “Why did you shiver?”
“Because it was cold.”

“No, that is not the reason you shivered.”
Then I said: “I shivered because I had not bed-clothes enough.”
“No, that is not the reason.”

“Well,” said I, “Professor, you are a scientific man. I am not.
I would like to have an expert, scientific opinion now,
why I shivered.”

He arose in his own way and said:
“Young man, you shivered because you did not know any better!
Didn’t you have in your pocket a newspaper?”
“Oh, yes, I had a “Herald” and a “Journal”.”

“That is it. You had them in your pocket, and if you had spread one
newspaper over your sheet when you went to bed, you would have
been as warm as you lay there, as the richest man in America under
all his silk coverlids.

But you shivered because you didn’t know enough
to put a two-cent newspaper on your bed, and you had it in your pocket.”

It is the open-mindedness to little things that brings human success.

Russell Conwell (February 15, 1843 – December 6, 1925) was an American Baptist minister, orator, philanthropist, lawyer, and writer. He is best remembered as the founder and first president of Temple University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and for his inspirational lecture Acres of Diamonds. The son of Massachusetts farmers, Conwell attended Yale University and after graduating enlisted in the Union Army during the American Civil War. He was ordained as a Baptist minister in 1880, and delivered his famous speech “Acres of Diamonds” over 6,000 times around the world. The central idea of the work is that one need not look elsewhere for opportunity, achievement, or fortune – the resources to achieve all good things are present in one’s own community. Conwell’s capacity to establish Temple University and his other civic projects largely derived from the income that he earned from the speech. The published version has been regarded as a classic of New Thought literature since the 1870s.

Should We Favor the Young With Organ Donations?

When we think about life, sometimes we think it’s better to lean towards the young. This especially seems to be a favorite when it comes to organ donating. Youth have full days ahead, and so much to contribute. Give them a full chance. Those who are older have already had a good term.  The younger are brimming with energy and opportunity. They can make our world better, so we say.

A case in point is about organ rationing, as pointed out in a recent article on the Economist which covered that younger potential recipients are favored.  But they then point out:

“A broader question is whether organ donations should favor the young. The share of total organ recipients aged 50 and older has jumped from 28% in 1988 to 60% last year. The rise has been even more dramatic for those 65 and older—the share jumped from 2% to 17%. These figures may rise further as the baby-boomers age.”

The Unenviable Task of Rationing Organs

This article made me pause.  It’s pointing to the fact that the average age and lifespan of each individual, is much, much longer. In fact the most recent record of age is a Japanese man who died last month, at age 116, from natural causes.

Even that is not enough to sway us.  Think about a precious parent, a beloved aunt, a treasured grandmother….have they really lived long enough?

Doth youth usurp their wisdom?

Does new energy trump experience?

Can a babe replace a cherished mentor?

Favoring organs to the young isn’t reasoning that necessarily works.  Every person is valued. Everyone has an equal abundance of love to give. Before we make a judgment call of in general which group should be served most, let’s first think of an individual in our lives. I think we will agree that age withstanding, young or old, we all cherish life.  Each individual is beautiful and deserving.

The Classic Pamela Positive: Audrey Hepburn’s Tips for Beauty…It’s All Inside

I love these beauty tips by Audrey Hepburn because they are accessible to us all.  How could Beauty be constrained?  We don’t have to wait for it, prepare for it or create it.  So much of beauty is how we are, each moment.   I look forward to hearing about your beautiful moments today!

For attractive lips, speak words of kindness.

For lovely eyes, seek out the good in people.

For a slim figure, share your food with the hungry.

For beautiful hair, let a child run their fingers through it once a day.

For poise, walk with the knowledge that you never walk alone.

People, more than things, have to be restored, renewed, revived, reclaimed, and redeemed.

Remember, if you ever need a helping hand, you will find one at the end of each of your arms. As you grow older, you will discover that you have two hands, one for helping yourself and the other for helping others.

We’re Going in Different Directions: No, We’re Not

One morning as I was leaving for work, my mom and I had a very special interchange.

We live in Menlo Park, and I was headed north to San Francisco.  My parents were headed south to Carmel for a bit of rest.  “Have a great day, Mom!  Thank you for having me… and now we’re going in different directions!”

“No, we’re not,” she said immediately.

I knew exactly what she meant.  Our minds and hearts are going in the same direction.   She’s taught me to be loving and kind.   To follow my heart, and to do what I love to do.  And to live rightly.   And that is what she does with her life.  She is so consistently, joyously serving others.  I’ve never seen a better model of this.

And so, as we parted that morning, we went in the same direction.