Tag Archives: community

The Classic Pamela Positive: Should Our Work Make Us Happy?

teamwork-383939_1280I find that so much of what is true ‘happiness’ in one’s job is how we conduct ourselves and our thinking.

For example, even if your job isn’t your exact ideal, there are elements that can bring full happiness. Being of service is not relegated to any one sector. Being professional, kind, courteous, and with a high “client service” attitude to external parties as well as to the internal team, can bring high “happiness” value.  Continue reading

The Classic Pamela Positive: The Positives of Serving Others

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As I’ve found in my own experience, volunteering can be such a positive and valued experience for both the people helping, and the people who need the help. I’d love to share just some of the Positives I’ve observed for volunteers.

1- Be A Part of Something Greater. Often new volunteers find that the “product” — serving homeless people, helping microentrepreneurs, tutoring young mothers on their GEDs, is so meaningful that it’s hard to return to the corporate world. They feel a part of something greater, because it is so definitively clear how they are helping. We all want to feel we are caring for and helping others, and are part of a movement larger than ourselves.

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The Classic Pamela Positive: Thoughts from Peter Drucker

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The Classic Pamela Positive: A Great Gift: “Call Me Brother”

A story I heard and found inspiring:

A famine was on in the land and a beggar on a street corner reached out to Tolstoy, who was passing by. Russia’s great man stopped, searched for a coin but found none. With genuine sorrow, he said: “Don’t be angry with me, my brother. I have nothing with me.”

The beggar’s face lit up as he replied, “But you called me brother–that is a great gift.”

The Pamela Positive: “Make a Gift of One’s Life”

“One makes a gift of one’s life and endeavors by sanctifying it with love, and devotion and selfless service. When seeking to uplift others, we are uplifted in the process. Every kind thought or smile therefore benefits oneself as well as all the world.”
– Dr. David Hawkins

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Dr. David Hawkins is an internationally renowned psychiatrist, physician, researcher, and pioneer in the fields of consciousness research and spirituality. He writes and teaches from the unique perspective of an experienced clinician, scientist, and mystic and is devoted to the spiritual evolution of mankind. (Bio source: Veritas Publishing)

The Classic Pamela Positive: Celebrate True Wealth

Wealth is a state of mind, and how we view it with gratitude.    Yet we tend to associate wealth with money.   But true wealth is in our relationships, the love we have and give, and the joy of each day.  Everyone can be a wealthy person, starting now, this moment.

I am often struck by this positive definition of wealth in my travel and volunteering in developing nations.  Families spend time together.  They gather food from the fields together, cook together and share meals.  It’s all about togetherness.  Further, marriages are usually for a lifetime and divorce rates are low.

If we don’t focus on family time, we lose our greatest asset in natural wealth: relationships. Relationships with ourselves, our families, and precious friends who have become like family.

This “living wealth” creates happy, balanced, productive, lower stress lifestyles, because we are connected in the way we are meant to be.

Be Wealthy Today.

With Love, Pamela

In a similar vein, poverty can be mental, emotional or spiritual.

The Pamela Positive: Divide and Rule…Unite and Lead

This is a great quote from Johann Wolfgang von Goethe: “Divide and rule, a sound motto; unite and lead, a better one.”

At times need to separate into distinct groups in order to have harmony…but that’s short term.  We are all most connected and most spiritually productive when we serve one another.

So if you need to divide and rule right now, you are taking a good step. One that provides clarity.   But in a close future, the habit will be one of uniting.     Differences, disagreements will disappear, whether it is a misunderstanding with a neighbor, or the devastation in the Congo.

Let’s hold to this unity: It’s a better you, me, all of us.

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Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749-1832) was a German poet, playwright, novelist, and natural philosopher, best known for his two-part poetic drama Faust, which he started around the age of twenty-three and didn’t finish till shortly before his death sixty years later. He is considered one of the greatest contributors of the German Romantic period. At the age of sixteen, in 1765, Goethe went to Leipzig University to study law as his father wished, though he also gained much recognition from the Rococo poems and lyric he wrote during this period. In 1766 he fell in love with Anne Catharina Schoenkopf (1746-1810) and wrote his joyfully exuberant collection of poems Annette.

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe now rests in the Fürstengruft or “Royal Tomb” in the “Historic Cemetery” in Wiemar where his dear friend Schiller is also laid to rest. In honour of these two famous German men of letters, a statue of Goethe and Schiller now stands at the German National Theatre in Munich. UNESCO’S “Memory of the World” list includes the handwritten works of Goethe preserved by the Goethe-Schiller-Archive.

Bio Source: The Literature Network