Category Archives: The Pamela Positive

The Classic Pamela Positive: Undertake Something So Great You Cannot Accomplish It Unaided

Phillips Brooks, an educator and spiritual leader, advised us to push ourselves into the unknown for a special reason: To become spiritual.

Well, you might ask, “Why is being spiritual so important? I simply want to create a great company, write a book, or scale Mount Kilimanjaro.”

The qualities it takes to do any of the above, and anything miraculous, are unseeable.  They are:

Perseverance: Don’t ever think of giving up…
Thoughtfulness and care in building a team…
Inspirational, being able to paint your vision in a way that excites others, impels them to take action…

You must have these qualities to build successful relationships and enduring companies.  Yet all of these are qualities which are not required in school, home or job.  And yet they are the invisible glue which will allow you “…to undertake something so great you cannot accomplish it unaided.”

They are not material or physical. They are spiritual.

“We never become truly spiritual by sitting and wishing to become so. You must undertake something so great that you cannot accomplish it unaided.”  – Phillips Brooks

Phillips Brooks was an American clergyman in the Episcopal church during the 19th century.  He published several books of lectures and sermons, as well as authoring the popular Christmas carol, “O Little Town of Bethlehem.”  He was highly regarded as a preacher and a patriot.

“You also have to remember that these kids are being raised in areas where they are not interacting with people of other races.” -Patrick Mims, Alumnus, San Quentin Prison University Project

“You can’t take someone who has grown up, who hasn’t seen any of this for their entire life except maybe seen it on television, and – I went to Princeton, and came back with my degree, and now I want to work with kids!

You also have to remember that these kids are being raised in areas where they are not interacting with people of other races. They’ve been taught that White people run the world. And then you put a White therapist in front of them?”

-Patrick Mims, Alumnus, San Quentin Prison University Project

We all want to help.

But what a lesson to us all from Patrick Mims, a former inmate at San Quentin who now is pursuing a Master’s degree in Social Work. If you are giving advice, make sure it’s wanted — and warranted.

We need to come from a space of understanding.  If you are helping someone work through an issue, have the humility to understand when you are a helper – or a listener. An advisor, or an encourager.  A seer or a follower.

Advise on what you know.   Encourage at all times

—✶—

Patrick Mims works as a supervisor at Bay Area Women Against Rape (BAWAR) for the Sexually Exploited Minors Program. In addition, he is a facilitator and presenter for Insight-Out, which is an organization that works with schools and youth programs to change the course of young people’s lives. He is a subject matter expert on the kinds of populations they serve.

Source: Prison University Project Newsletter

The Pamela Positive: How To Attain The Big H” (Happiness) Once Again

Our culture is getting better. We are increasingly aware that money, homes, cars, jewelry, multiple choices of cereal and designer goods do not bring us happiness.  Or, it might be fleeting but not lasting happiness.

So how do we create and maintain “The Big H”?  Elizabeth Barrett Browning’s wise counsel was in one word: friendship.  It is our friendships, our sincere connections to people, which bring meaning, joy, and yes, “The Big H,” into our lives.

Said Mrs. Browning, the poet, to Charles Kingsley, the writer;
“What is the secret of your happiness? Tell me, that I may enjoy the same.”
Thinking a moment, the kindly old man replied, “I have a friend.”

Elizabeth Barrett Browning was a popular poet of the Victorian era.  Her best-known poem opens “How Do I Love Thee, Let Me Count the Ways,” written to her husband, the poet Robert Browning.  Charles Kingsley was a clergyman, professor and writer, author of the children’s classic, The Water-Babies.

The Pamela Positive: “Manifest Plainness, Embrace Simplicity. Reduce Selfishness, Have Few Desires.” – Lao Tzu

Manifest plainness, embrace simplicity. Reduce selfishness, have few desires.” – Lao Tzu

Lao Tzu’s counsel helps us to keep life pure.  If we are running from one activity to the next, we are missing serenity in our daily lives. If we are accumulating things, our lives are crowded by materialism.  It can prevent us from being clear and free to receive new ideas.

Simplicity allows us to not be distracted.  We focus on living a life well-lived. We focus on spiritual qualities such as kindness and consideration, which allow our lives to serve others, and ourselves, with the highest good in mind.

The specific birthdate of Lao Tzu is unknown. Legends vary, but scholars place his birth between 600 and 300 B.C.E. Lao Tzu is attributed with the writing of the “Tao-Te Ching,” (tao—meaning the way of all life, te—meaning the fit use of life by men, and ching—meaning text or classic). Lao Tzu was not his real name, but an honorific given the sage, meaning “Old Master.”  Lao Tzu wanted his philosophy to remain a natural way to live life with goodness, serenity and respect. Lao Tzu laid down no rigid code of behavior. He believed a person’s conduct should be governed by instinct and conscience.

The Pamela Positive: “It Is the Open-Mindedness to Little Things That Brings Human Success.”

What a wonderful story which shows how we can all be resourceful. We can figure out a different way to achieve even our smallest needs, and maintain a positive outlook. Look up, look around, and use what you see!

It’s there for us all…It’s already been provided.

Pamela

I said to a relative of mine, who was a professor at Harvard:
“I was cold all the time I was there, and I shivered so that my teeth shook”.
Said he: “Why did you shiver?”
“Because it was cold.”

“No, that is not the reason you shivered.”
Then I said: “I shivered because I had not bed-clothes enough.”
“No, that is not the reason.”

“Well,” said I, “Professor, you are a scientific man. I am not.
I would like to have an expert, scientific opinion now,
why I shivered.”

He arose in his own way and said:
“Young man, you shivered because you did not know any better!
Didn’t you have in your pocket a newspaper?”
“Oh, yes, I had a “Herald” and a “Journal”.”

“That is it. You had them in your pocket, and if you had spread one
newspaper over your sheet when you went to bed, you would have
been as warm as you lay there, as the richest man in America under
all his silk coverlids.

But you shivered because you didn’t know enough
to put a two-cent newspaper on your bed, and you had it in your pocket.”

It is the open-mindedness to little things that brings human success.

Russell Conwell (February 15, 1843 – December 6, 1925) was an American Baptist minister, orator, philanthropist, lawyer, and writer. He is best remembered as the founder and first president of Temple University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and for his inspirational lecture Acres of Diamonds. The son of Massachusetts farmers, Conwell attended Yale University and after graduating enlisted in the Union Army during the American Civil War. He was ordained as a Baptist minister in 1880, and delivered his famous speech “Acres of Diamonds” over 6,000 times around the world. The central idea of the work is that one need not look elsewhere for opportunity, achievement, or fortune – the resources to achieve all good things are present in one’s own community. Conwell’s capacity to establish Temple University and his other civic projects largely derived from the income that he earned from the speech. The published version has been regarded as a classic of New Thought literature since the 1870s.